Artemis Gallery LIVE

Artemis Gallery Live est spécialisée dans les antiquités, l'art antique et ethnographique et ils ne vendent que des exemples authentiques. Tous les objets proposés à la vente sont garantis anciens et authentiques, ont été acquis légalement et sont vendus légalement. Ils offrent une inscription facile et des descriptions d'enchères précises avec photos professionnelles pour leurs ventes aux enchères en ligne.

En vente chez "Artemis Gallery LIVE"

Chavin Stone Mace Head - Owl Form

Pre-Columbian, Peru, Chavin culture, ca. 200 BCE. A heavy, polished stone mace head, made from a dense, green-brown stone, carved to have a wide socket with rounded edges. Four raised, fin- or beak-like projections emerge from the sides at regular intervals, each rising above the socket. Between each are two studded spikes, the upper one larger than the lower. Taken together, this gives the mace head an owl-like appearance from every direction. The owl was a frequent Chavin motif, associated with death and shamanism. Size: 3.05" W x 3.75" H (7.7 cm x 9.5 cm); 6.05" H (15.4 cm) on included custom stand. Significantly, the Chavin culture does not seem to have been warlike, and their cultural expansion across the landscape was not accompanied - at least as far as archaeologists can find - until the very end of the period, when maces like this suddenly become evident. Was this an actual weapon used in war? Or was this a status symbol made to be put into a grave? Many mysteries about this early culture remain. Provenance: ex-private Hawaii, USA collection All items legal to buy/sell under U.S. Statute covering cultural patrimony Code 2600, CHAPTER 14, and are guaranteed to be as described or your money back. A Certificate of Authenticity will accompany all winning bids. We ship worldwide to most countries and handle all shipping in-house for your convenience. #142802En savoir plus

  • USAUSA
  • 3d 12h
Estimation basse
700 EUR

Lot of 2 20th C. Hopi Wood Kachina Dolls - Glenn Fred

Southwestern USA, Arizona and New Mexico, Hopi Peoples, ca. 20th century CE, signed by Glenn Fred (active late 20th century). A pair of beautifully carved cottonwood kachina dolls. One is Angwusnasomtaka, Crow Mother, depicted with her large feathered headdress, holding a bundle of sticks. The other is Pachavuin Mana, the female version of Hemis Kachin Mana, played by a woman if masked (as this one is). Size of largest: 5.95" W x 13.25" H (15.1 cm x 33.7 cm) Glenn Fred is a master Kachina doll carver, winner of the 1996 Santa Fe Indian Market Kachina Doll Division. His brother Jim Fred is also a Kachina artist. The Katsinam, supernatural beings who live in the high mountains of the San Francisco Peaks above traditional Hopi territory, speak to the Hopi through costumed dance and song. These dancers emerge from the round ceremonial kivas that are at the center of their communities, singly or in groups, and dance to the music of drums, rattles, and song. In imitation and representation of them are Katsina figures (katsina dolls, katsin-tihu), made of cottonwood root. Cottonwood is culturally symbolic because the cottonwood tree, once abundant in traditional Hopi lands, grows where water flows - thus, looking across a landscape, lines of cottonwood trees denote a water source in the desert. After carving, the figures are painted all over with whitewash, made from kaolin clay, and then painted in brilliant colors. Originally these were done using yucca brushes. Many of them are then decorated with other materials, like feathers, cloth, or fur. Katsina dolls are often given objects to hold which indicate their roles. See some other kachina carved by Glenn Fred for sale for $900 each: https://www.antiqueamericanindianart.com/store/p454/%285001-01%29_Hopi_Kachina%3A_Heoto_Mana_by_Glenn_Fred.html Provenance: private New York, New York, USA collection; ex-private lifetime collection of Dr. Saul Tuttman and Dr. Gregory Siskind, New York, New York, USA All items legal to buy/sell under U.S. Statute covering cultural patrimony Code 2600, CHAPTER 14, and are guaranteed to be as described or your money back. A Certificate of Authenticity will accompany all winning bids. We ship worldwide to most countries and handle all shipping in-house for your convenience. #141357En savoir plus

  • USAUSA
  • 3d 12h
Estimation basse
530 EUR

Fine Colima Pottery Standing Shaman

Pre-Columbian, West Mexico, Colima, ca. 100 BCE to 250 CE. A superb redware standing male figure with an animated pose - his body leaning slightly forward, his legs spread apart with large feet planted upon the ground to assume a wide stance. He also holds an avian reclinatorio behind his head, his left hand securing the one leg of the bird. Nude save a crested headband embellished with a black criss-cross pattern, a loin cloth, and a horn-shaped pendant around his neck. Given this decorated state, he likely represents a shaman, ritual performer, or ballplayer. His visage is quite expressive, presenting slit eyes, an arched browline, pronounced nose, defined cheekbones, and slightly parted lips. This piece, with the opening atop the head, was most likely used to pour ritualistic libations. A superb example displaying captivating gestures and facial expression, quite distinct from those of the neighboring Jalisco and Nayarit cultures. Size: 15.25" H (38.7 cm) Provenance: private New York, New York, USA collection; ex-private lifetime collection of Dr. Saul Tuttman and Dr. Gregory Siskind, New York, New York, USA All items legal to buy/sell under U.S. Statute covering cultural patrimony Code 2600, CHAPTER 14, and are guaranteed to be as described or your money back. A Certificate of Authenticity will accompany all winning bids. We ship worldwide to most countries and handle all shipping in-house for your convenience. #141340En savoir plus

  • USAUSA
  • 3d 12h
Estimation basse
3 500 EUR

Maya Pottery Whistle - Standing Warrior

Pre-Columbian, Maya Territories, Late Classic, ca. 600 to 1000 CE. A wonderfully detailed figural whistle in the form of a standing elite person wearing an incredible outfit - long robes and a huge zoomorphic headdress, possibly representing a jaguar. This high status outfit would have been immediately recognizable to the Maya people, who would then have known who this whistle is meant to represent. We know that Classic Maya rulers often took jaguar names, like Shield-Jaguar and Bird-Jaguar at Yaxchilan, that Maya gods and kings wore jaguar skin clothing, and that Spanish colonialists reported that there was a "Spokesman of the Jaguar" who wore a jaguar skin (a fun job if you could get it!). This figure, therefore, probably represents a king or a god. The figure is clearly made in two halves in a mold; the Late Classic period marked new developments in technology and more complex and lifelike human depictions for Mayan artwork. Figural whistles like these have been found archaeologically in household contexts, perhaps representing a souvenir from visiting a holy site. Size: 4.45" W x 7.2" H (11.3 cm x 18.3 cm) Provenance: private southern California, USA collection, acquired in the 1970s to mid-1980s All items legal to buy/sell under U.S. Statute covering cultural patrimony Code 2600, CHAPTER 14, and are guaranteed to be as described or your money back. A Certificate of Authenticity will accompany all winning bids. We ship worldwide to most countries and handle all shipping in-house for your convenience. #143015En savoir plus

  • USAUSA
  • 3d 12h
Estimation basse
700 EUR

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Roman Marble Sarcophagus Section - Erote & Grapes
Roman, Imperial Period, ca. 2nd century CE. Finely carved in extremely high relief - virtually in the round - a section of a marble sarcophagus depicting the god Eros (Roman Cupid) or one of the Erotes (Roman Cupids) holding a large bunch of harvested grapes in his left hand. Eros, depicted as a nude cherub, is posed standing in contrapposto, with his weight shifted to his left leg, one arm angled to carry the fruit of the vine, the other missing its forearm, perhaps once carrying more grapes (a common theme of Hellenistic and Roman art) or his bow. In addition to possessing an impressive understanding of anatomy and an ability to render flesh from stone, the sculptor of this piece was skilled in communicating naturalism in Cupid's facial features - those generously lidded, almond-shaped eyes, apple cheeks, pudgy nose, and full lips - framed by a wavy coiffure adorned by a leafy crown. Size: 10.75" W x 24.5" H (27.3 cm x 62.2 cm); 27.375" H (69.5 cm) on included custom stand. Eros was the mischievous yet endearing god of love, a minion, constant companion, and according to some classical writers, a son of the goddess Aphrodite. In the Roman period, Eros had become a child (to the earlier Greeks, he was a muscular youth), but here he retains his mischievous air, ready to help couples fall in love through not-entirely-innocent interventions. In time, ancient poets and artists multiplied Eros into a group of Erotes - winged gods of love or Roman Cupides. Hesiod describes a pair - Eros (Love) and Himeros (Desire) - both present at the birth of Aphrodite. However, later writers added a third Erote named Pothos (Passion). Some depicted twin Erotes - Eros (Love) and Anteros (Love Reciprocated) - who were usually shown gracing the scales of love. Eventually, poets multiplied them to envision an even greater number of winged putti. Indeed, the Erotes were the creations of poetic invention without any distinct mythology of their own - as opposed to Eros, the God of Love. See a marble sarcophagus fragment depicting Eros - although much smaller and less complete than this example - at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York (accession number: 49.101.16) - https://www.metmuseum.org/art/collection/search/254643 Provenance: private East Coast, USA collection All items legal to buy/sell under U.S. Statute covering cultural patrimony Code 2600, CHAPTER 14, and are guaranteed to be as described or your money back. A Certificate of Authenticity will accompany all winning bids. We ship worldwide and handle all shipping in-house for your convenience. #132442 Artemis Gallery LIVE
Large Early 20th C. Papua New Guinea Maprik Wood Figure
Oceania, Papua New Guinea, Maprik region, Abelam peoples, ca. early 20th century CE. An enormous hand-carved wooden ancestral figure standing upon a pair of lengthy legs with delineated male genitalia hanging in-between. The figure holds both arms to its slender waist, each with several painted or incised scarification marks, with a rounded ovoid chest above displaying a wide shell-form pectoral between sloping shoulders. A thick neck supports the figure's massive head, defined by a curving beard, full lips, and flush eyes and nose, all surmounted by a pair of arching horns. Areas of traditional blue, white, black, and yellow pigment adorn almost every body part, though age and environmental conditions have worn away most of the added coloration. Figures like this were carved in the likeness of a deceased family member, and were often spiritually consulted during times of crises or for advice before making an important decision. Custom museum-quality display stand included. Size: 12.75" W x 68.75" H (32.4 cm x 174.6 cm); 69.25" H (175.9 cm) on included custom stand. A similar example with intact upper body features hammered for $7,200 at Sotheby's, New York "African and Oceanic Art" Auction (November 16, 2001, lot 213): http://www.sothebys.com/en/auctions/ecatalogue/2001/african-and-oceanic-art-n07731/lot.213.html Provenance: private Newport Beach, California, USA collection All items legal to buy/sell under U.S. Statute covering cultural patrimony Code 2600, CHAPTER 14, and are guaranteed to be as described or your money back. A Certificate of Authenticity will accompany all winning bids. We ship worldwide and handle all shipping in-house for your convenience. #135698 Artemis Gallery LIVE
Early Medieval French Knight's Helmet
France, Ca. 7th-10th Century CE. A late Antique/early Medieval iron helmet of France. Helmet mimics the Roman Legionary helmet with large bowl with lip that hangs down the neck. 11"H x 10-1/4"L Provenance: Ex-M. Carini Collection, CA; Ex-Victoria Antiques, UK. Authenticity Guaranteed The starting price is the price at which the piece can sell. Artemis Gallery LIVE
19th C. Spanish Colonial Wood Santo - Virgin Mary
New World, Spanish Colonial, Mexico, ca. 19th century CE. A tall and expressive wooden santo figure of Mary. She stands robed in dark red, draped with a deep blue, gold-trimmed and cream-lined cloak. Her hands are extended upwards, her face tilted to the sky. She wears a large, ornate tin crown and stands atop a multi-tiered, dark pedestal. Worshippers have placed a set of rosary beads and a crucifix on a chain around her hand and neck. Size: 8" L x 7.75" W x 22.25" H (20.3 cm x 19.7 cm x 56.5 cm). Santos played an important role in bringing the Catholic Church to the New World with the Spanish colonists. These religious figures were hand-carved and often furnished with crowns, jewels, and other accessories, usually funded by religious devotees, and were used as icons to explain the major figures - Mary, Christ, and the saints - to new, indigenous converts. Likewise, they served as a connection to the Old World for Spanish colonists far from home. They became a folk art tradition in the Spanish New World, from modern day Guatemala to as far north as New Mexico and Colorado. Many of them were lovingly cared for over the years, with repairs and paint added as they aged, and played an active part for a long time in the religious life of their communities. Provenance: ex-Francis & Lilly Robicsek collection, Charlotte, North Carolina, USA All items legal to buy/sell under U.S. Statute covering cultural patrimony Code 2600, CHAPTER 14, and are guaranteed to be as described or your money back. A Certificate of Authenticity will accompany all winning bids. We ship worldwide and handle all shipping in-house for your convenience. #120470 Artemis Gallery LIVE
Lot of 2 Greek Hellenistic Pottery Vessels
Greece, Hellenistic Period, ca. 323 to 1st century BCE. A pair of small pottery vessels, one with a long neck and bulbous body capped by a slightly flared rim, and the other in an amphora shape with a long, slender body that moves down to a flat base. Both would have been made as alternatives to glass, which at the time was very expensive to produce, and would have been used to hold small quantities of precious liquids - perhaps olive oil? Size of largest: 2.2" W x 6" H (5.6 cm x 15.2 cm) Provenance: Ex-Private CT collection All items legal to buy/sell under U.S. Statute covering cultural patrimony Code 2600, CHAPTER 14, and are guaranteed to be as described or your money back. A Certificate of Authenticity will accompany all winning bids. We ship worldwide and handle all shipping in-house for your convenience. #118479 Artemis Gallery LIVE

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