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Native American Acoma Polychrome Olla #210

Native American Acoma Poly chrome Olla 210. Description: Acoma Poly chrome Olla, New Mexico: circa 1910, earthenware, well-turned with bulbous shape tapering to small base, exterior repeating geometric shapes in three bands, partial interior glaze. 9 x 8 in. Reportedly, examined in 2001 by Ed Wade of the Museum of Northern Arizona, of which, as of 2002, he was deputy director. Appropriate wear from age and use resulting in a pleasing surface appearance; small rim nicks/flakes; roughness at base. A History of Pueblo Pottery: “Pueblo pottery is made using a coiled technique that came into northern Arizona and New Mexico from the south, some 1500 years ago. In the four-corners region of the US, nineteen pueblos and villages have historically produced pottery. Although each of these pueblos use similar traditional methods of coiling, shaping, finishing and firing, the pottery from each is distinctive. Various clay's gathered from each pueblo’s local sources produce pottery colors that range from buff to earthy yellows, oranges, and reds, as well as black. Fired pots are sometimes left plain and other times decorated—most frequently with paint and occasionally with appliqué. Painted designs vary from pueblo to pueblo, yet share an ancient iconography based on abstract representations of clouds, rain, feathers, birds, plants, animals and other natural world features. Tempering materials and paints, also from natural sources, contribute further to the distinctiveness of each pueblo’s pottery. Some paints are derived from plants, others from minerals. Before firing, potters in some pueblos apply a light colored slip to their pottery, which creates a bright background for painted designs or simply a lighter color plain ware vessel. Designs are painted on before firing, traditionally with a brush fashioned from yucca fiber. Different combinations of paint color, clay color, and slips are characteristic of different pueblos. Among them are black on cream, black on buff, black on red, dark brown and dark red on white (as found in Zuni pottery), matte red on red, and polychrome—a number of natural colors on one vessel (most typically associated with Hopi). Pueblo potters also produce undecorated polished black ware, black on black ware, and carved red and carved black wares. Making pueblo pottery is a time-consuming effort that includes gathering and preparing the clay, building and shaping the coiled pot, gathering plants to make the colored dyes, constructing yucca brushes, and, often, making a clay slip. While some Pueblo artists fire in kilns, most still fire in the traditional way in an outside fire pit, covering their vessels with large potsherds and dried sheep dung. Pottery is left to bake for many hours, producing a high-fired result. Today, Pueblo potters continue to honor this centuries-old tradition of hand-coiled pottery production, yet value the need for contemporary artistic expression as well. They continue to improve their style, methods and designs, often combining traditional and contemporary techniques to create striking new works of art.” (Source: Museum of Northern Arizona) View the other items in my shop: http://www.etsy.com/shop/CulturalPatina?ref=shopsection_shophome_leftnav, Native American, Acoma Poly chrome Olla, 210. Description: Acoma Poly chrome Olla, New Mexico: circa 1910, earthenware, well-turned with bulbous shape tapering to small base, exterior repeating geometric shapes in three bands, partial interior glaze. 9 x 8 in. Reportedly, examined in 2001 by Ed Wade of the Museum of Northern Arizona, of which, as of 2002, he was deputy director. Appropriate wear from age and use resulting in a pleasing surface appearance; small rim nicks/flakes; roughness at base. A History of Pueblo Pottery: “Pueblo pottery is made using a coiled technique that came into northern Arizona and New Mexico from the south, some 1500 years ago. In the four-corners region of the US, nineteen pueblos and villages have historically produced pottery. Although each of these pueblos use similar traditional methods of coiling, shaping, finishing and firing, the pottery from each is distinctive. Various clay's gathered from each pueblo’s local sources produce pottery colors that range from buff to earthy yellows, oranges, and reds, as well as black. Fired pots are sometimes left plain and other times decorated—most frequently with paint and occasionally with appliqué. Painted designs vary from pueblo to pueblo, yet share an ancient iconography based on abstract representations of clouds, rain, feathers, birds, plants, animals and other natural world features. Tempering materials and paints, also from natural sources, contribute further to the distinctiveness of each pueblo’s pottery. Some paints are derived from plants, others from minerals. Before firing, potters in some pueblos apply a light colored slip to their pottery, which creates a bright background for painted designs or simply a lighter color plain ware vessel. Designs are painted on before firing, traditionally with a brush fashioned from yucca fiber. Different combinations of paint color, clay color, and slips are characteristic of different pueblos. Among them are black on cream, black on buff, black on red, dark brown and dark red on white (as found in Zuni pottery), matte red on red, and polychrome—a number of natural colors on one vessel (most typically associated with Hopi). Pueblo potters also produce undecorated polished black ware, black on black ware, and carved red and carved black wares. Making pueblo pottery is a time-consuming effort that includes gathering and preparing the clay, building and shaping the coiled pot, gathering plants to make the colored dyes, constructing yucca brushes, and, often, making a clay slip. While some Pueblo artists fire in kilns, most still fire in the traditional way in an outside fire pit, covering their vessels with large potsherds and dried sheep dung. Pottery is left to bake for many hours, producing a high-fired result. Today, Pueblo potters continue to honor this centuries-old tradition of hand-coiled pottery production, yet value the need for contemporary artistic expression as well. They continue to improve their style, methods and designs, often combining traditional and contemporary techniques to create striking new works of art.” (Source: Museum of Northern Arizona) View the other items in my shop: http://www.etsy.com/shop/CulturalPatina?ref=shopsection_shophome_leftnavEn savoir plus

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Vintage Pottery Bowl : Excellent Vintage Acoma Pottery Bowl by Rose

Vintage Pottery Bowl Description: Rose Chino Garcia Acoma pottery bowl, inside decorated with fish and deer, bottom signed Rose Chino Garcia, Acoma, New Mexico, 5" high x 12" diameter. Very good condition for its age. Rose Chino and her sisters, Carrie Chino Charlie, Vera Chino Ely and Grace Chino, are daughters of Marie Z. Chino and all of them are exceptional potters, as was their mother. Garcia's pottery is in the collections of the Peabody Museum at Harvard University, Heard Museum in Phoenix, Philbrook Museum of Art in Tulsa, and numerous private collections. She has won awards at Santa Fe Indian Market since 1975 one award was for most creative design. Garcia was an exceptional potter, achieving beautifully thin-walled vessels and well-balanced designs. She passed away on November 10, 2000 at the age of 72. Her daughter, Tena Garcia is carrying on the tradition of this magnificent pottery, which she learned from her month and grandmother, Marie Zieu Chino. 2000. Pueblo pottery is made using a coiled technique that came into northern Arizona and New Mexico from the south, some 1500 years ago. In the four-corners region of the US, nineteen pueblos and villages have historically produced pottery. Although each of these pueblos use similar traditional methods of coiling, shaping, finishing and firing, the pottery from each is distinctive. Various clay's gathered from each pueblo's local sources produce pottery colors that range from buff to earthy yellows, oranges, and reds, as well as black. Fired pots are sometimes left plain and other times decorated most frequently with paint and occasionally with applique. Painted designs vary from pueblo to pueblo, yet share an ancient iconography based on abstract representations of clouds, rain, feathers, birds, plants, animals and other natural world features. Tempering materials and paints, also from natural sources, contribute further to the distinctiveness of each pueblo‰۪s pottery. Some paints are derived from plants, others from minerals. Before firing, potters in some pueblos apply a light colored slip to their pottery, which creates a bright background for painted designs or simply a lighter color plain ware vessel. Designs are painted on before firing, traditionally with a brush fashioned from yucca fiber. Different combinations of paint color, clay color, and slips are characteristic of different pueblos. Among them are black on cream, black on buff, black on red, dark brown and dark red on white (as found in Zuni pottery), matte red on red, and polychrome a number of natural colors on one vessel (most typically associated with Hopi). Pueblo potters also produce undecorated polished black ware, black on black ware, and carved red and carved black wares. Making pueblo pottery is a time-consuming effort that includes gathering and preparing the clay, building and shaping the coiled pot, gathering plants to make the colored dyes, constructing yucca brushes, and, often, making a clay slip. While some Pueblo artists fire in kilns, most still fire in the traditional way in an outside fire pit, covering their vessels with large potsherds and dried sheep dung. Pottery is left to bake for many hours, producing a high-fired result. Today, Pueblo potters continue to honor this centuries-old tradition of hand-coiled pottery production, yet value the need for contemporary artistic expression as well. They continue to improve their style, methods and designs, often combining traditional and contemporary techniques to create striking new works of art. (Source: Museum of Northern Arizona), Vintage Pottery Bowl, Description: Rose Chino Garcia Acoma pottery bowl, inside decorated with fish and deer, bottom signed Rose Chino Garcia, Acoma, New Mexico, 5" high x 12" diameter. Very good condition for its age. Rose Chino and her sisters, Carrie Chino Charlie, Vera Chino Ely and Grace Chino, are daughters of Marie Z. Chino and all of them are exceptional potters, as was their mother. Garcia's pottery is in the collections of the Peabody Museum at Harvard University, Heard Museum in Phoenix, Philbrook Museum of Art in Tulsa, and numerous private collections. She has won awards at Santa Fe Indian Market since 1975 one award was for most creative design. Garcia was an exceptional potter, achieving beautifully thin-walled vessels and well-balanced designs. She passed away on November 10, 2000 at the age of 72. Her daughter, Tena Garcia is carrying on the tradition of this magnificent pottery, which she learned from her month and grandmother, Marie Zieu Chino. 2000. Pueblo pottery is made using a coiled technique that came into northern Arizona and New Mexico from the south, some 1500 years ago. In the four-corners region of the US, nineteen pueblos and villages have historically produced pottery. Although each of these pueblos use similar traditional methods of coiling, shaping, finishing and firing, the pottery from each is distinctive. Various clay's gathered from each pueblo's local sources produce pottery colors that range from buff to earthy yellows, oranges, and reds, as well as black. Fired pots are sometimes left plain and other times decorated most frequently with paint and occasionally with applique. Painted designs vary from pueblo to pueblo, yet share an ancient iconography based on abstract representations of clouds, rain, feathers, birds, plants, animals and other natural world features. Tempering materials and paints, also from natural sources, contribute further to the distinctiveness of each pueblo‰۪s pottery. Some paints are derived from plants, others from minerals. Before firing, potters in some pueblos apply a light colored slip to their pottery, which creates a bright background for painted designs or simply a lighter color plain ware vessel. Designs are painted on before firing, traditionally with a brush fashioned from yucca fiber. Different combinations of paint color, clay color, and slips are characteristic of different pueblos. Among them are black on cream, black on buff, black on red, dark brown and dark red on white (as found in Zuni pottery), matte red on red, and polychrome a number of natural colors on one vessel (most typically associated with Hopi). Pueblo potters also produce undecorated polished black ware, black on black ware, and carved red and carved black wares. Making pueblo pottery is a time-consuming effort that includes gathering and preparing the clay, building and shaping the coiled pot, gathering plants to make the colored dyes, constructing yucca brushes, and, often, making a clay slip. While some Pueblo artists fire in kilns, most still fire in the traditional way in an outside fire pit, covering their vessels with large potsherds and dried sheep dung. Pottery is left to bake for many hours, producing a high-fired result. Today, Pueblo potters continue to honor this centuries-old tradition of hand-coiled pottery production, yet value the need for contemporary artistic expression as well. They continue to improve their style, methods and designs, often combining traditional and contemporary techniques to create striking new works of art. (Source: Museum of Northern Arizona)En savoir plus

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Custom Made Necklace: Tuareg Lock From Niger in North Africa #1109

Extraordinary Custom Made Necklace: Tuareg Lock With Accompanying Key Etched With Traditional Motifs, From Niger in North Africa #1109 Description: # 1109 This was my personal necklace and the story of the unique and beautiful piece follows: Extraordinary Custom Made Necklace: Tuareg Lock With Accompanying Key Etched With Traditional Motifs,and gorgeous vintage pendant in this necklace is from the Tuareg people in Niger, North Africa. The lock was purchased from Ineke Hemminga, https://www.facebook.com/InekehemmingaTuaregBerberjewelry. The accompanying beads/components came from around the world to help complement the Lock. The necklace was put together by master cultural jewelry maker, Bioux Walla,https://www.etsy.com/shop/BijouxWalla?ref=l2-shopheader-name. A rare old find from the Sahara, this Tuareg lock with accompanying key has been etched with traditional motifs, from Niger in North Africa. This amazing piece is made of silver, copper and brass and has a layered geometric design. It is tarnished and its subtle patina show signs of age and use. It comes with a key, which was incorporated into the pendant as part of the design. The key to this pendant has been integrated into the pendant itself. And Masbaha-Tasbih prayer beads with sterling silver nails have been added to the side of the lock and two on the wire loops that hand from the lock to provide more continuity between the pendant and the necklace. The Tuareg pendant, including the attached lock is approx. 90mm (3.54 inches) long and approx. 82mm ( 3.2” ) wide and approx. 17mm deep. Hand forged thick copper rings connect the pendant to the necklace portion of the piece. At the top of the necklace are two strands of beads with vintage Tuareg tribal silver from the 1920's. Capping the silver Tuareg beads are Tuareg brass stamped cornerless cube beads that have been individually patterned by hand with a traditional motif. They are also from the 1920's. Thai Karen Hill Tribe silver beads have been placed in-between the Tuareg beads to provide interest. The shape and detailing of these beads compliment the Tuareg beads. These beads are 97-99% silver and handmade by Thai Karen Hill Tribe People using old traditional techniques passing from generation to generation. Two large large Islamic Prayer Beads made of black coral - Komboloi-Tasbih, with sterling silver nails, and red and blue inlays provide color and texture and transition the front of the necklace to the back. Antique gold finished handmade brass beads from Nepal, capped with Tuareg brass stamped cornerless cube beads continue throughout the necklace. They are interspersed with small vintage hand crafted coco kuka Masbaha Tasbih prayer beads with sterling silver nails. The Tuareg are nomads and are known for their history of trans-Saharan caravan and salt trade. Today the Tuareg's are a pastoral people who have mostly settled in West Africa. The Tuareg are sometimes called the “Blue People” because of the indigo pigment in the cloth of their traditional robes and turbans, stained their skin blue. The necklace is approx. 24.5 inches long (includes clasp). The clasp is handmade of brass and has a brass chain extension (approx. 3 inches) with a coco kuku Masbaha Tasbih prayer bead dangle. Extraordinary Custom Made Necklace:, Tuareg Lock With Accompanying Key Etched With Traditional Motifs, From Niger in North Africa #1109, Description: # 1109 This was my personal necklace and the story of the unique and beautiful piece follows: Extraordinary Custom Made Necklace: Tuareg Lock With Accompanying Key Etched With Traditional Motifs,and gorgeous vintage pendant in this necklace is from the Tuareg people in Niger, North Africa. The lock was purchased from Ineke Hemminga, https://www.facebook.com/InekehemmingaTuaregBerberjewelry. The accompanying beads/components came from around the world to help complement the Lock. The necklace was put together by master cultural jewelry maker, Bioux Walla,https://www.etsy.com/shop/BijouxWalla?ref=l2-shopheader-name. A rare old find from the Sahara, this Tuareg lock with accompanying key has been etched with traditional motifs, from Niger in North Africa. This amazing piece is made of silver, copper and brass and has a layered geometric design. It is tarnished and its subtle patina show signs of age and use. It comes with a key, which was incorporated into the pendant as part of the design. The key to this pendant has been integrated into the pendant itself. And Masbaha-Tasbih prayer beads with sterling silver nails have been added to the side of the lock and two on the wire loops that hand from the lock to provide more continuity between the pendant and the necklace. The Tuareg pendant, including the attached lock is approx. 90mm (3.54 inches) long and approx. 82mm ( 3.2” ) wide and approx. 17mm deep. Hand forged thick copper rings connect the pendant to the necklace portion of the piece. At the top of the necklace are two strands of beads with vintage Tuareg tribal silver from the 1920's. Capping the silver Tuareg beads are Tuareg brass stamped cornerless cube beads that have been individually patterned by hand with a traditional motif. They are also from the 1920's. Thai Karen Hill Tribe silver beads have been placed in-between the Tuareg beads to provide interest. The shape and detailing of these beads compliment the Tuareg beads. These beads are 97-99% silver and handmade by Thai Karen Hill Tribe People using old traditional techniques passing from generation to generation. Two large large Islamic Prayer Beads made of black coral - Komboloi-Tasbih, with sterling silver nails, and red and blue inlays provide color and texture and transition the front of the necklace to the back. Antique gold finished handmade brass beads from Nepal, capped with Tuareg brass stamped cornerless cube beads continue throughout the necklace. They are interspersed with small vintage hand crafted coco kuka Masbaha Tasbih prayer beads with sterling silver nails. The Tuareg are nomads and are known for their history of trans-Saharan caravan and salt trade. Today the Tuareg's are a pastoral people who have mostly settled in West Africa. The Tuareg are sometimes called the “Blue People” because of the indigo pigment in the cloth of their traditional robes and turbans, stained their skin blue. The necklace is approx. 24.5 inches long (includes clasp). The clasp is handmade of brass and has a brass chain extension (approx. 3 inches) with a coco kuku Masbaha Tasbih prayer bead dangleEn savoir plus

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Embroidered Blouse : Extremely Fine Akha Hand Embroidered Ladies Blouse

Embroidered Blouse 424. Made with hand woven and dyed cloth, hand embroidered in detail and adorned with Jobes tear beads. Collected from the Akha in hills around Chiang Mai, Thailand over 50 years ago. Good condition considering its age. Villages of these colorful people are to be found in the mountains of China, Laos Myanmar (Burma) and northern Thailand. There are approximately 20,000 Akha living in Thailand's Northern provinces of Chiang Rai and Chiang Mai at high altitudes. This tribe originated in Tibet. Every Akha village is distinguished by their carved wooden gates, presided over by guardian spirits. They life in raised houses on low stilts, with a large porch leading into a square living area with a stove at the back. The roof is steeply pitched. They live on marginal land and find it difficult to eke out a living through their slash and burn method of agriculture. In order to supplement their income, many Akha are now selling handicrafts, employing the traditional skills used in making their own clothing and cultural items. Akha women spin cotton into thread with a hand spindle, then leave it on a foot-treadle loom. The cloth is dyed with indigo, then sewed into clothing for the family. The women wear broad leggings, a short black skirt with a white beaded sporran, a loose fitting black jacket with heavily embroidered cuffs and lapels. The black caps are covered with silver coins. Akha men and women produce various decorative items of bamboo and seeds. The men make crossbows, musical instruments, a variety of baskets, and other items of wood, bamboo and rattan. The Akha are deeply superstitious, their religion prescribing exactly how each action should be performed. This tribe is the poorest of the hill tribes, but well known for their extraordinary costumes and exotic appearance. (Source: Thailand online), Embroidered Blouse, 424. Made with hand woven and dyed cloth, hand embroidered in detail and adorned with Jobes tear beads. Collected from the Akha in hills around Chiang Mai, Thailand over 50 years ago. Good condition considering its age. Villages of these colorful people are to be found in the mountains of China, Laos Myanmar (Burma) and northern Thailand. There are approximately 20,000 Akha living in Thailand's Northern provinces of Chiang Rai and Chiang Mai at high altitudes. This tribe originated in Tibet. Every Akha village is distinguished by their carved wooden gates, presided over by guardian spirits. They life in raised houses on low stilts, with a large porch leading into a square living area with a stove at the back. The roof is steeply pitched. They live on marginal land and find it difficult to eke out a living through their slash and burn method of agriculture. In order to supplement their income, many Akha are now selling handicrafts, employing the traditional skills used in making their own clothing and cultural items. Akha women spin cotton into thread with a hand spindle, then leave it on a foot-treadle loom. The cloth is dyed with indigo, then sewed into clothing for the family. The women wear broad leggings, a short black skirt with a white beaded sporran, a loose fitting black jacket with heavily embroidered cuffs and lapels. The black caps are covered with silver coins. Akha men and women produce various decorative items of bamboo and seeds. The men make crossbows, musical instruments, a variety of baskets, and other items of wood, bamboo and rattan. The Akha are deeply superstitious, their religion prescribing exactly how each action should be performed. This tribe is the poorest of the hill tribes, but well known for their extraordinary costumes and exotic appearance. (Source: Thailand online)En savoir plus

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Storage Jar : Small Pre-Columbian Chancay Pottery Storage Jar #344

Storage Jar 344. Description: Peru, Ca 1000 to 1200 CE Small storage jar nicely decorated. 6" x 6". Provenance: Ex Brining Collection, collected some 40 years ago. Condition: Ware as expected, but generally intact and excellent for its age. All items are unconditionally guaranteed to be Authentic as described. For added security we offer a full money-back guarantee if a recognized authority disputes the authenticity of any object sold. History: Not much is known about the Chancay civilization which developed in the later part of the Inca empire. This culture emerged after the fall of the Wari civilization. Parts of the southern Chancay area were conquered by the Chim̼ in the early fifteenth century and in about 1450 A.D. the Incas were occupying both areas. [1] It is believed that the Chancay had a centralized political structure, forming a small regional state.[3] Thus the Chancay culture declined in the fifteenth century to make way for the territorial expansion of the Inca Empire. Occupying the central coast coastal region of Peru, the Chancay were centered mostly in the Chancay and ChillÌ_n valleys, although they also occupied other areas such as the Rimac and Lurin valley areas. [2] The center of the Chancay culture was located 80 kilometers north of Lima. It is a desert region but has fertile valleys bathed by rivers and is rich in resources that allowed for, among other things, extensive agricultural development. The Chancay developed intense trade relations with other regions, allowing them to interract with other cultures and settlements in a wide area. Economy: The Chancay culture based its economy on agriculture, fishing and trade. Water reservoirs and irrigation canals were built by engineers in order to develop agriculture. As the culture was geographically located on the oceanfront, they were involved in traditional fishing both from the shore as well as further out to sea from their caballitos de totora, an ancient type of watercraft unique to Peru. The Chancay also traded with other regions either by land towards the Peruvian highlands and jungle or by sea to the north and south of their borders. The settlements in Lauri, Lumbra, Tambo Blanco, Handrail, Pisquillo Chico and Tronconal focused mainly on artisans producing large-scale ceramics and textiles. The Chancay culture is the first of the Peruvian cultures that had mass production of ceramics, textiles and metals such as gold and silver which were ritualistic and domestic goods. They were also noted for their wood carved items. [1] The curacas, political leaders, regulated the production of artisans, farmers and ranchers as well as oversaw festive activities. Textiles: The most well-known Chancay artefacts are the textiles which ranged from embroidered pieces, different types of fabrics decorated with paint. A variety of techniques, colours and themes were used in the making of textiles.[2] They used an array of colours including yellows, browns, scarlet, white, blues and greens.[1] types of fabric used included: llama wool, cotton, chiffon and feathers.[2] Their technique involved were decorated open weave, brocade, embroidery, and painting.[2] Brushes were used to paint anthropomorphic, zoomorphic, geometric and other creative designs directly on the canvases. The Chancay are known for the quality of their painted tapestries. The typically geometric designs also included drawings of plants, animals such as fish, cats, birds, monkeys and dogs (most notably the hairless Peruvian dog[4]) as well as human figures.[3] Birds and deities wearing crescent-like headdresses were one of the more common decorative features.[1] They produced a variety of goods such as clothing, bags, and funeral masks.[2] Many Chancay textiles survive to date. It is believed that their production was quite extensive, due to the quantities that have been preserved. The quality of the textile material appears to be good as they were carefully made. [1] Canvases or gauzes were used primarily for religious and magical purposes. They were made for covering the head of the dead in the form of a headdresses. According to the beliefs of the time, the threads on these fabrics had to be spun in the form of an "S" in an anticlockwise direction. This thread, which had a magical character, was called lloque and, according to legend, the garments were infused with supernatural powers and served as protection in the afterlife. Feathers were inserted into a main thread which was then sewn onto the fabric. The Chancay also manufactured dolls and other objects covered with pieces of woven fabric and various threads. Ceramics: Ceramics are also a very common feature of the Chancay culture. This pottery has been found mainly in the cemeteries of the Ancon and Chancay valleys. The Chancay civilization produced ceramics on a large scale using moulds. However, open vessels with more than 400 different types of drawings that have yet to be decrypted, uniquely created by artisans, have been found. The technique used in creating ceramics was with a rough matt surface that was later painted with a dark colour, usually black or brown, on top of a lighter cream or white background. This dark on light characteristic is known as black on white. Vessels are often large and quaintly shaped. Egg-shaped jars are some of the more common. Ceramic dolls or female figurines were also created. These were usually large, female-looking dolls made from clay. The faces and sometimes the upper sections of the body are covered with ornaments of different geometric shapes.[1] The eyes were accentuated with a line on each side and the arms were usually short.[3] These geometric ornamentations are very common on Chancay ceramics.[1] Other common ceramic vessels were oblong jars with narrow necks and wide mouths, with designs in the form of human faces and geometric shapes painted in the black on cream technique. Other common animal shapes are birds or llamas. [3] There were also miniature sized idols called cuchimilcos which were anthropomorphic shapes representative of human figures, having prominent jaws and eyes painted in black. These cuchimilcos figures usually had their arms extended as if they were ready to fly or inviting a hug. It is believed that they were used to turn away bad energies. This is perhaps why they have been mostly found in the tombs of the Chancay nobility. Woodwork: The wood carvings done by the Chancay are characterized by their simplicity, sobriety [2] and use of shapes from nature, quite opposed to the sophistication of their textile art. From wood they produced implements of daily use, statues and items for decoration, some of which they painted.[2] Using the wood from their coastal desert the Chancay carved large and small objects, finely engraved with motifs reflecting the marine environment, such as seabirds and boats. They also manufactured tools for use in the textile work, in farming and fishing operations, as well as a variety of objects for worship and to distinguish the social status of the populace. Human heads carved in wood were common. They were used to crown the mummies of important dignitaries, as a mark of their status as deity or mythical ancestor, which they acquired after death. The human images in wood could also be indicators of political power, especially when they were carved into sticks or batons of command. Architecture and social organization: With respect to architecture, this civilization is noted for creating large urban centres with pyramid-shaped mounds and complex buildings. It was organized by different types of settlements or ayllus and controlled by leaders or curacas. The urban centres had typical constructions for civic-religious purposes which also included residential palaces. These urban centers were quite large, perhaps due to the mass production of goods. [2] Their culture was marked by social stratification, which was also present in the small towns. The constructions were mostly made of adobe bricks, were organized in clusters and were also similarly designed according to a specific pattern. Sometimes the most prominent constructions were mixed or combined with stones. Its inhabitants were settled based on their trade so that they could massify the production of goods. Access to the pyramids was through ramps, i.e. from top to bottom. Their hydraulic engineering works such as reservoirs and irrigation canals were also of great notoriety. [2] (Source: Wikipedia) References 1 "The Chancay Culture". Retrieved 18 February 2013. 2. "Central Andes". Museo Chileno de Arte Precolombino. Retrieved 18 February 2013. 3. "Featured Artifacts: Chancay Culture, AD 1000-1400". SFU Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology. Retrieved 18 February 2013. 4. "Per̼ celebra 24 a̱os de reconocimiento mundial a perro sin pelo". El Universal. 14 June 2009. Retrieved 19 February 2013. 5. Wikipedia, Storage Jar, 344. Description: Peru, Ca 1000 to 1200 CE Small storage jar nicely decorated. 6" x 6". Provenance: Ex Brining Collection, collected some 40 years ago. Condition: Ware as expected, but generally intact and excellent for its age. All items are unconditionally guaranteed to be Authentic as described. For added security we offer a full money-back guarantee if a recognized authority disputes the authenticity of any object sold. History: Not much is known about the Chancay civilization which developed in the later part of the Inca empire. This culture emerged after the fall of the Wari civilization. Parts of the southern Chancay area were conquered by the Chim̼ in the early fifteenth century and in about 1450 A.D. the Incas were occupying both areas. [1] It is believed that the Chancay had a centralized political structure, forming a small regional state.[3] Thus the Chancay culture declined in the fifteenth century to make way for the territorial expansion of the Inca Empire. Occupying the central coast coastal region of Peru, the Chancay were centered mostly in the Chancay and ChillÌ_n valleys, although they also occupied other areas such as the Rimac and Lurin valley areas. [2] The center of the Chancay culture was located 80 kilometers north of Lima. It is a desert region but has fertile valleys bathed by rivers and is rich in resources that allowed for, among other things, extensive agricultural development. The Chancay developed intense trade relations with other regions, allowing them to interract with other cultures and settlements in a wide area. Economy: The Chancay culture based its economy on agriculture, fishing and trade. Water reservoirs and irrigation canals were built by engineers in order to develop agriculture. As the culture was geographically located on the oceanfront, they were involved in traditional fishing both from the shore as well as further out to sea from their caballitos de totora, an ancient type of watercraft unique to Peru. The Chancay also traded with other regions either by land towards the Peruvian highlands and jungle or by sea to the north and south of their borders. The settlements in Lauri, Lumbra, Tambo Blanco, Handrail, Pisquillo Chico and Tronconal focused mainly on artisans producing large-scale ceramics and textiles. The Chancay culture is the first of the Peruvian cultures that had mass production of ceramics, textiles and metals such as gold and silver which were ritualistic and domestic goods. They were also noted for their wood carved items. [1], The curacas, political leaders, regulated the production of artisans, farmers and ranchers as well as oversaw festive activities. Textiles: The most well-known Chancay artefacts are the textiles which ranged from embroidered pieces, different types of fabrics decorated with paint. A variety of techniques, colours and themes were used in the making of textiles.[2] They used an array of colours including yellows, browns, scarlet, white, blues and greens.[1], types of fabric used included: llama wool, cotton, chiffon and feathers.[2] Their technique involved were decorated open weave, brocade, embroidery, and painting.[2] Brushes were used to paint anthropomorphic, zoomorphic, geometric and other creative designs directly on the canvases. The Chancay are known for the quality of their painted tapestries. The typically geometric designs also included drawings of plants, animals such as fish, cats, birds, monkeys and dogs (most notably the hairless Peruvian dog[4]) as well as human figures.[3] Birds and deities wearing crescent-like headdresses were one of the more common decorative features.[1] They produced a variety of goods such as clothing, bags, and funeral masks.[2], Many Chancay textiles survive to date. It is believed that their production was quite extensive, due to the quantities that have been preserved. The quality of the textile material appears to be good as they were carefully made. [1], Canvases or gauzes were used primarily for religious and magical purposes. They were made for covering the head of the dead in the form of a headdresses. According to the beliefs of the time, the threads on these fabrics had to be spun in the form of an "S" in an anticlockwise direction. This thread, which had a magical character, was called lloque and, according to legend, the garments were infused with supernatural powers and served as protection in the afterlife. Feathers were inserted into a main thread which was then sewn onto the fabric. The Chancay also manufactured dolls and other objects covered with pieces of woven fabric and various threads. Ceramics: Ceramics are also a very common feature of the Chancay culture. This pottery has been found mainly in the cemeteries of the Ancon and Chancay valleys. The Chancay civilization produced ceramics on a large scale using moulds. However, open vessels with more than 400 different types of drawings that have yet to be decrypted, uniquely created by artisans, have been found. The technique used in creating ceramics was with a rough matt surface that was later painted with a dark colour, usually black or brown, on top of a lighter cream or white background. This dark on light characteristic is known as black on white. Vessels are often large and quaintly shaped. Egg-shaped jars are some of the more common. Ceramic dolls or female figurines were also created. These were usually large, female-looking dolls made from clay. The faces and sometimes the upper sections of the body are covered with ornaments of different geometric shapes.[1] The eyes were accentuated with a line on each side and the arms were usually short.[3] These geometric ornamentations are very common on Chancay ceramics.[1], Other common ceramic vessels were oblong jars with narrow necks and wide mouths, with designs in the form of human faces and geometric shapes painted in the black on cream technique. Other common animal shapes are birds or llamas. [3] There were also miniature sized idols called cuchimilcos which were anthropomorphic shapes representative of human figures, having prominent jaws and eyes painted in black. These cuchimilcos figures usually had their arms extended as if they were ready to fly or inviting a hug. It is believed that they were used to turn away bad energies. This is perhaps why they have been mostly found in the tombs of the Chancay nobility. Woodwork: The wood carvings done by the Chancay are characterized by their simplicity, sobriety [2] and use of shapes from nature, quite opposed to the sophistication of their textile art. From wood they produced implements of daily use, statues and items for decoration, some of which they painted.[2] Using the wood from their coastal desert the Chancay carved large and small objects, finely engraved with motifs reflecting the marine environment, such as seabirds and boats. They also manufactured tools for use in the textile work, in farming and fishing operations, as well as a variety of objects for worship and to distinguish the social status of the populace. Human heads carved in wood were common. They were used to crown the mummies of important dignitaries, as a mark of their status as deity or mythical ancestor, which they acquired after death. The human images in wood could also be indicators of political power, especially when they were carved into sticks or batons of command. Architecture and social organization: With respect to architecture, this civilization is noted for creating large urban centres with pyramid-shaped mounds and complex buildings. It was organized by different types of settlements or ayllus and controlled by leaders or curacas. The urban centres had typical constructions for civic-religious purposes which also included residential palaces. These urban centers were quite large, perhaps due to the mass production of goods. [2], Their culture was marked by social stratification, which was also present in the small towns. The constructions were mostly made of adobe bricks, were organized in clusters and were also similarly designed according to a specific pattern. Sometimes the most prominent constructions were mixed or combined with stones. Its inhabitants were settled based on their trade so that they could massify the production of goods. Access to the pyramids was through ramps, i.e. from top to bottom. Their hydraulic engineering works such as reservoirs and irrigation canals were also of great notoriety. [2] (Source: Wikipedia), References, 1 "The Chancay Culture". Retrieved 18 February 2013. 2. "Central Andes". Museo Chileno de Arte Precolombino. Retrieved 18 February 2013. 3. "Featured Artifacts: Chancay Culture, AD 1000-1400". SFU Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology. Retrieved 18 February 2013. 4. "Per̼ celebra 24 a̱os de reconocimiento mundial a perro sin pelo". El Universal. 14 June 2009. Retrieved 19 February 2013. 5. WikipediaEn savoir plus

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Konyak Whiteheart/Extremely Old Orange Pipe Bead Belt from Nagaland

Belt Authentic Museum Quality Konyak White heart belt 477. Authentic Museum Quality Konyak White heart/Extremely Old Orange Pipe Bead Belt from Nagaland, NE India, the oldest, original Indian-made prototypical tubular red glass beads, in this case, orange, mixed with burgundy white heart and mustard glass beads, with mithun bone separators. Please note that the designation Authentic means that the piece was made by the Naga's and used by them in their actual ceremonies and not made for tourists. The piece measures approximately 31" long by 5" wide and is in excellent museum quality condition. Beads were probably acquired in trade, from Europe and India, from Late 19th to mid 20th century, The Chank shell is from the Indian Ocean and cut in South India, from the 19th century. Nagaland has a rich diversity of ethnic groups, languages and religions. More than 80% of the population lives in small, isolated villages and practice their own rituals and traditions that have been existing since centuries. The Nagas are said to belong to the Indo-Mongoloid stock, a race whose presence was first noted ten centuries before Christ, at the time of the compilation of the Vedas. The Nagas are mostly Christians. Naga Features: The Nagas are usually medium sized. The nose is flat, eyes curved, complexion fair, and hair straight. Men are muscular and women are usually short. One unique feature of the Nagas is that they wear conical red headgear decorated with wild boar canine teeth and white black Hornbill feathers, the spear with the shaft decorated with red black hairs and the unique dao with broad blade and long handle. Both men and women wear traditional Naga jewellery. Naga shawls are very famous among the tribes. Tattooing is customary among the tribes. Nagaland Culture The tribes of Nagaland are unique in their culture and traditions. The tribes are excellent and skilled craftsmen. Naga tribes are known for being hard working and laborious. They are known for making exquisite bamboo and cane products, weaving and wood carving. The Nagas are expert in basketry, weaving, woodcarving, pottery and metal work. Agriculture is the main occupation of the people. Rice, millet and Taro potato are grown by the people. The tribes of Nagaland are very fond of dance and music. Music forms an essential parts of their lives. There are different traditional dances and music of the different tribes. The music of is characterized by folk songs and music accentuated by traditional instruments. People of Nagaland are also famous for celebrating numerous seasonal fairs and festivals. All the tribes celebrate their own distinct festivals with dance and music. The most important festivals celebrated by the tribes include Sekrenyi, Moatsu Mong, Suhkruhnye, Bushu, Yemshe, Metumniu among others. The food of the Naga tribe consist of rice, millet, vegetables, fish, meat, Naga chilly and chutney. Nagaland Village System: The tribes live mainly in villages. For the Nagas family is the most important institution. Women are treated equally with men. Nagas are traditionally and tribally organized with a strong warrior tradition. Head hunting is an important aspect of the people. Most of the houses of the Nagas have skull displaying their warrior qualities. Different Tribes of Nagaland: Nagaland is home to some 16 different kinds of tribes with distinct and fascinating cultures. Each of the Naga tribe is divided into as many as twenty clans. The Nagas speak 60 different dialects. The prominent tribes are Angami, Ao, Chakhesang, Chang, Khiamniungan, Konyak, Lotha, Pochury, Phom, Poumai, Rongmei Naga, Rengma, Sangtam, Sema, Mao and Zeliang among many others. The languages of the Nagas may vary from Angami-Pochury, Ao, Kukish, Sal, Tangkhul and Zeme branches of Tibeto Burman. Some important tribes are: Angami Naga: The Angami Nagas are one of the major tribes of Nagaland. The Angamis mainly celebrate the Sekrenyi festival. They are basically hill people and depend on agriculture for their mode of livelihood. 98 % of the Angamis are Christians. Ao Naga: Ao Nagas are another major tribes in Nagaland. They reside mainly in Tsula to Tsurang in Mokokchung district. The Ao Nagas are known for the celebration of different harvest festivals. The Aos are primarily Christians. Chang: Changs are one of the recognized Scheduled Tribes in India. The traditional territory of the Chang lies in the Central Tuensang district. About 99 % of the Changs are Christians. They speak the Chang language and the Chang people are very fond of music and dance. They celebrate Christmas, Naknyu Lem, Poang Lem, Jeinyu Leam and so many other festivals with fanfare and gaiety. Konyak: Konyak have the largest populations among the Nagas. They are found in the Mon district of Nagaland. They are famous for their tattoos all over their faces and hands. Lotha: Lotha is also a major Naga tribe and reside in the Wokha district. They are popular for traditional dance and folk songs. Sumi: Sumi Nagas are one of the major Naga tribes. They mainly inhabit in the Zunheboto district. 99 % of the Sumis are Christians. Tuluni and Ahuna are the most important festivals of the Sumis. Yimchunger: Yimchunger is a minor Naga group. Metmneo festival is celebrated by the Yimchunge people. Khiamniungan: Khiamniungan is comparatively a minor Naga group. They mainly reside in the Tuensang district in Nagaland. Miu festival and Tsokum festival are the most important festivals celebrated by this tribal group. (Source: India on line) Tangkhul: Tangkhul is a Naga tribe living in the Indo-Burma border area occupying the Ukhrul district in Manipur, India and the Somra Tangkhul hills (Somra tract) in Upper Burma. Despite this international border, many Tangkhul have continued to regard themselves as "one nation".[1], Belt, Authentic Museum Quality Konyak White heart belt, 477. Authentic Museum Quality Konyak White heart/Extremely Old Orange Pipe Bead Belt from Nagaland, NE India, the oldest, original Indian-made prototypical tubular red glass beads, in this case, orange, mixed with burgundy white heart and mustard glass beads, with mithun bone separators. Please note that the designation Authentic means that the piece was made by the Naga's and used by them in their actual ceremonies and not made for tourists. The piece measures approximately 31" long by 5" wide and is in excellent museum quality condition. Beads were probably acquired in trade, from Europe and India, from Late 19th to mid 20th century, The Chank shell is from the Indian Ocean and cut in South India, from the 19th century. Nagaland has a rich diversity of ethnic groups, languages and religions. More than 80% of the population lives in small, isolated villages and practice their own rituals and traditions that have been existing since centuries. The Nagas are said to belong to the Indo-Mongoloid stock, a race whose presence was first noted ten centuries before Christ, at the time of the compilation of the Vedas. The Nagas are mostly Christians. Naga Features: The Nagas are usually medium sized. The nose is flat, eyes curved, complexion fair, and hair straight. Men are muscular and women are usually short. One unique feature of the Nagas is that they wear conical red headgear decorated with wild boar canine teeth and white black Hornbill feathers, the spear with the shaft decorated with red black hairs and the unique dao with broad blade and long handle. Both men and women wear traditional Naga jewellery. Naga shawls are very famous among the tribes. Tattooing is customary among the tribes. Nagaland Culture, The tribes of Nagaland are unique in their culture and traditions. The tribes are excellent and skilled craftsmen. Naga tribes are known for being hard working and laborious. They are known for making exquisite bamboo and cane products, weaving and wood carving. The Nagas are expert in basketry, weaving, woodcarving, pottery and metal work. Agriculture is the main occupation of the people. Rice, millet and Taro potato are grown by the people. The tribes of Nagaland are very fond of dance and music. Music forms an essential parts of their lives. There are different traditional dances and music of the different tribes. The music of is characterized by folk songs and music accentuated by traditional instruments. People of Nagaland are also famous for celebrating numerous seasonal fairs and festivals. All the tribes celebrate their own distinct festivals with dance and music. The most important festivals celebrated by the tribes include Sekrenyi, Moatsu Mong, Suhkruhnye, Bushu, Yemshe, Metumniu among others. The food of the Naga tribe consist of rice, millet, vegetables, fish, meat, Naga chilly and chutney. Nagaland Village System: The tribes live mainly in villages. For the Nagas family is the most important institution. Women are treated equally with men. Nagas are traditionally and tribally organized with a strong warrior tradition. Head hunting is an important aspect of the people. Most of the houses of the Nagas have skull displaying their warrior qualities. Different Tribes of Nagaland: Nagaland is home to some 16 different kinds of tribes with distinct and fascinating cultures. Each of the Naga tribe is divided into as many as twenty clans. The Nagas speak 60 different dialects. The prominent tribes are Angami, Ao, Chakhesang, Chang, Khiamniungan, Konyak, Lotha, Pochury, Phom, Poumai, Rongmei Naga, Rengma, Sangtam, Sema, Mao and Zeliang among many others. The languages of the Nagas may vary from Angami-Pochury, Ao, Kukish, Sal, Tangkhul and Zeme branches of Tibeto Burman. Some important tribes are:, Angami Naga: The Angami Nagas are one of the major tribes of Nagaland. The Angamis mainly celebrate the Sekrenyi festival. They are basically hill people and depend on agriculture for their mode of livelihood. 98 % of the Angamis are Christians. Ao Naga: Ao Nagas are another major tribes in Nagaland. They reside mainly in Tsula to Tsurang in Mokokchung district. The Ao Nagas are known for the celebration of different harvest festivals. The Aos are primarily Christians. Chang: Changs are one of the recognized Scheduled Tribes in India. The traditional territory of the Chang lies in the Central Tuensang district. About 99 % of the Changs are Christians. They speak the Chang language and the Chang people are very fond of music and dance. They celebrate Christmas, Naknyu Lem, Poang Lem, Jeinyu Leam and so many other festivals with fanfare and gaiety. Konyak: Konyak have the largest populations among the Nagas. They are found in the Mon district of Nagaland. They are famous for their tattoos all over their faces and hands. Lotha: Lotha is also a major Naga tribe and reside in the Wokha district. They are popular for traditional dance and folk songs. Sumi: Sumi Nagas are one of the major Naga tribes. They mainly inhabit in the Zunheboto district. 99 % of the Sumis are Christians. Tuluni and Ahuna are the most important festivals of the Sumis. Yimchunger: Yimchunger is a minor Naga group. Metmneo festival is celebrated by the Yimchunge people. Khiamniungan: Khiamniungan is comparatively a minor Naga group. They mainly reside in the Tuensang district in Nagaland. Miu festival and Tsokum festival are the most important festivals celebrated by this tribal group. (Source: India on line), Tangkhul: Tangkhul is a Naga tribe living in the Indo-Burma border area occupying the Ukhrul district in Manipur, India and the Somra Tangkhul hills (Somra tract) in Upper Burma. Despite this international border, many Tangkhul have continued to regard themselves as "one nation".[1]En savoir plus

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Ron Stewart Oil Painting on Canvas, Masruf El Nattall, Arabian Stallion

695. Original oil painting of an Arabian horse named "Masruf El Nattall". The previous owners family raised, studded, and showed the horse. He died over 25 years ago. This horse was the parents pride and joy. It is also one of Ron's first paintings of an Arabian horse early in his career. Dimensions: It measures 32.5 W X 26.5 L. Condition: Painting is in excellent condition for its age, but there is some staining on the cloth insert of the original frame. Provenance: From an estate in Florida. Additional Ron Stewart Paintings can be found at: https://www.etsy.com/your/shops/CulturalPatina/sections/16492699 and his Bronze work can be found at: https://www.etsy.com/your/shops/CulturalPatina/sections/16131018 Ron Stewart is a painter and sculptor of western, historical, wildlife, and animal subjects. He was born in Brooklyn, NY. In the over-crowded field of contemporary western artists, Ron Stewart's professional achievements have made his work familiar to a wide range of discriminating collectors. Ron is among those who is tied hard and fast to the quality of painting and the historical fidelity of the Old West Masters. The refined artistic abilities, in watercolor, oil, and bronze, are truly distinguished, but Ron brings more to his work than just the technical competence of a western illustrator. The Ron Stewart hallmark is the representation of the mood and the atmosphere appropriate to whatever he approaches. His paintings breathe life into the dusty pages of western history, be it the bawl of longhorn cattle, the war whoop of the red men, or the mountain man in his wilderness solitude. Ron has received awards multiple times at the competitive Death Valley Invitational (5), the George Phippen Memorial (3), and Best of Show, and Best Watercolor at the Pikes Peak National Invitational Show (2), and he also received numerous awards at the Western Artist of America, including three gold medals in Watercolor, two Silver medals in Watercolor, and one Silver medal in Oil, and one Silver medal in Bronze. His work can be seen at Mountain Trail Galleries in Jackson, Wyoming; Signature Gallery, Scottsdale, Arizona, and Santa Fe, NM; Long coat Gallery, Ruidoso, NM; and Sanders Gallery, Tucson, AZ. His life was chronicled in Artists of the Rockies and the Golden West in winter of 1979, Stewart has exhibited throughout the West in juried and group shows, collecting a variety of top awards for his works, including numerous gold and silver medals in oil, watercolor, bronze and drawing. International collections include locations in England, France, Germany, Italy, Denmark, Spain, the Philippines, and Japan. View the other items in my shop: http://www.etsy.com/shop/CulturalPatina?ref=shopsection_shophome_leftnav, 695. Original oil painting of an Arabian horse named "Masruf El Nattall". The previous owners family raised, studded, and showed the horse. He died over 25 years ago. This horse was the parents pride and joy. It is also one of Ron's first paintings of an Arabian horse early in his career. Dimensions: It measures 32.5 W X 26.5 L. Condition: Painting is in excellent condition for its age, but there is some staining on the cloth insert of the original frame. Provenance: From an estate in Florida. Additional Ron Stewart Paintings can be found at: https://www.etsy.com/your/shops/CulturalPatina/sections/16492699 and his Bronze work can be found at: https://www.etsy.com/your/shops/CulturalPatina/sections/16131018 Ron Stewart is a painter and sculptor of western, historical, wildlife, and animal subjects. He was born in Brooklyn, NY. In the over-crowded field of contemporary western artists, Ron Stewart's professional achievements have made his work familiar to a wide range of discriminating collectors. Ron is among those who is tied hard and fast to the quality of painting and the historical fidelity of the Old West Masters. The refined artistic abilities, in watercolor, oil, and bronze, are truly distinguished, but Ron brings more to his work than just the technical competence of a western illustrator. The Ron Stewart hallmark is the representation of the mood and the atmosphere appropriate to whatever he approaches. His paintings breathe life into the dusty pages of western history, be it the bawl of longhorn cattle, the war whoop of the red men, or the mountain man in his wilderness solitude. Ron has received awards multiple times at the competitive Death Valley Invitational (5), the George Phippen Memorial (3), and Best of Show, and Best Watercolor at the Pikes Peak National Invitational Show (2), and he also received numerous awards at the Western Artist of America, including three gold medals in Watercolor, two Silver medals in Watercolor, and one Silver medal in Oil, and one Silver medal in Bronze. His work can be seen at Mountain Trail Galleries in Jackson, Wyoming; Signature Gallery, Scottsdale, Arizona, and Santa Fe, NM; Long coat Gallery, Ruidoso, NM; and Sanders Gallery, Tucson, AZ. His life was chronicled in Artists of the Rockies and the Golden West in winter of 1979, Stewart has exhibited throughout the West in juried and group shows, collecting a variety of top awards for his works, including numerous gold and silver medals in oil, watercolor, bronze and drawing. International collections include locations in England, France, Germany, Italy, Denmark, Spain, the Philippines, and Japan. , View the other items in my shop: http://www.etsy.com/shop/CulturalPatina?ref=shopsection_shophome_leftnavEn savoir plus

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Navajo Rugs : Two Grey Hills Navajo Weaving by Lucy Simpson #95

Navajo Rugs 95. Description: Navajo Weaving. 3' x 2'5". Two Grey Hills area woven from all home spun wool. Woven by Lucy Simpson. Excellent condition. A Brief Social History of Navajo Weaving and a bit of historical context for a popular contemporary collectible. There is an ageless beauty to Navajo weaving. Navajo weaving's are many things to people. Above all else, Navajo weaving's are masterworks, regardless of whose criteria of art is used to judge them. They are evocative, timeless portraits which, like all good art, transcend time and space. Navajo weaving has captured the imagination of many not only because they are beautiful, well-woven textiles but also because they so accurately mirror the social and economic history of Navajo people. Succinctly, Navajo women wove their life experiences into the pieces. Navajo people tell us they learned to weave from Spider Woman and that the first loom was of sky and earth cords, with weaving tools of sunlight, lightning, white shell, and crystal. Anthropologists speculate Navajos learned to weave from Pueblo people by 1650. There is little doubt Pueblo weaving was already influenced by the Spanish by the time they shared their weaving skills with Navajo people. Spanish influence includes the substitution of wool for cotton, the introduction of indigo (blue) dye, and simple stripe patterning. Besides the "manta" (a wider-than-long wearing blanket), Navajo weavers also made a tunic-like dress, belts, garters, hair ties, men's shirts, breech cloths, and a "serape-style" wearing blanket. These blankets were longer-than-wide and were patterned in brown, blue and white stripes and terraced lines. For more than a century, the products of Navajo looms were probably identical to those of their Pueblo teachers, but by the end of the 1700's Navajo weaving began its divergence. While Pueblo weavers remained conservative, Navajo weavers learned that wefts did not need to be passed through all the warps each time, but rather, by stopping at whatever point they wished they could create patterning other than horizontal bands. These "pauses" in Navajo weaving are often seen as "lazy-lines" (diagonal lines across the horizontal wefts) in finished pieces. By 1800, weavers were using this technique to create terraced lines and discrete design elements. Navajo weavers also demonstrated more willingness to use color than their Pueblo teachers. Spanish documents describing the Southwest in the early 18th century mention Navajo weaving skills. By the 1700s Navajo weaving was an important trade item to the Pueblos and Plains Indian people. In 1844, Santa Fe Trail traveler Josiah Gregg reported, "a singular species of blanket, known as the Serape Navajo which is of so close and dense a texture that it will frequently hold water almost equal to gum-elastic cloth. It is therefore highly prized for protection against the rains. Some of the finer qualities are often sold among the Mexicans as high as fifty or sixty dollars each." Blankets were traded great distances as evidenced by their appearance in Karl Bodmer's 1833 painting of a Piegan Blackfoot man (Montana) wearing what appears to be a first-phase Chief's blanket or an 1845 sketch of Cheyenne at Bent's Fort (Colorado) wearing striped blankets. Historic photographs illustrate that the desirability of blankets increased with the 19th century. Closer and more frequent trading partners included the Utes, Apaches, Comanches, and Pueblos. The Spanish or Mexicans had never been able to reach a lasting peace with the Navajo. When Mexico ceded the Southwest to the United States in 1848, the "Navajo Problem" was also inherited. With a pronounced resolve, Kit Carson led a "Scorched Earth" campaign in 1863, destroying food caches, herds and orchards, ending in 8000 Navajo people surrendering. They were marched hundreds of miles to an arid, barren reservation, Bosque Redondo, at Fort Sumner in eastern NM. For five years the people endured incarceration with shortages of supplies, food, and water. Their culture changed dramatically during this period, not least in weaving. To substitute for their lost flocks, annuities were paid which included cotton string, commercially-manufactured natural- and aniline-dyed yarns as well as manufactured cloth and blankets. These lessened the Navajo people's reliance on their own loom products. In 1867, four thousand Spanish-made blankets were distributed to the Navajos as part of their annuity payment. The combination of widespread availability of yarns and cloth and the influence of the Spanish Saltillo designs were probably a direct inspiration in the dramatic shift in weaving during the Bosque Redondo years, from the stripes and terraced patterns of the Classic period to the serrate or diamond style of the Transitional period. It is testimony to the resiliency of Navajo culture that a period of internment could produce a robust period of change and continuity in weaving. In 1868, the Navajo were allowed to return to their beloved mesas and canyons. In exchange for their return they promised to cease aggression against neighboring peoples, and to settle and become farmers. Reservation life brought further dramatic changes to Navajo culture, including a growing reliance on American civilization and its products. The sale of weaving's in the next thirty years would provide an essential vehicle for economic change from barter to cash. Annuity goods included yarns, wool cards, indigo dye, aniline dyes, and various kinds of factory woven cloth. Skirts and blouses made of manufactured cloth replaced the woven two-piece blanket dress. Manufactured Pendleton blankets displaced hand-woven mantas and shoulder blankets so that by the 1890's, there was relatively little need for loom products in Navajo society. US government-licensed traders began to establish themselves on the new Navajo Reservation. Whatever their motivation, adventure or commerce, the traders became the chief link between the Navajo and the non-Indian world. Trading posts exchanged goods for Navajo products such as pinon nuts, wool, sheep, jewelry, baskets, and rugs. While wool and sheep were important to Navajo people for weaving and meat, they were also important to the economy beyond the Reservation. Wool was in great demand in the industrialized eastern US for coats, upholstery, and other products. Traders bought wool by the pound and sold it to wool brokers in Albuquerque and Las Vegas, New Mexico. The sheep purchased by traders were herded to the nearest rail head and on to the slaughterhouses. The herds grew substantially and it became more profitable for Navajo people to sell wool rather than utilize it in weaving. The railroad reached Gallup, NM in 1882, establishing a tangible connection between the Navajos and the wider market, with the traders acting as middlemen. The completion of the railroad signaled the closing of the American Frontier which, in turn, stimulated a nationwide interest in collecting American Indian art. The railroad made travel to the vast reaches of the west easier and thus opened the area for tourists. The traders recognized these new markets and began to influence weaving by paying better prices for weaving's they thought more attractive to non-Indian buyers. This new market, coupled with the Navajo's decline in use of their hand woven products, infused new life into Navajo textile arts. By the 1880's, trading posts were well established on the Navajo Reservation, and traders encouraged weaving of floor rugs and patterns using more muted colors which they thought would appeal to the non-Indian market. By 1920, many regional styles of Navajo weaving developed around trading posts. These rugs are often known by the area's trading post's name. The history of Navajo weaving continues; over the past century, Navajo weaving has flourished, maintaining its importance as a vital native art to the present day. Virtually all the nineteenth and twentieth-century styles of blankets and rugs are still woven, and new styles continue to appear. Thanks to Bruce Bernstein, former director, Museum of Indian Arts and Culture, Museum of New Mexico , Santa Fe Originally appeared in The Collector's Guide to Santa Fe and Taos - Volume 11, Navajo Rugs, 95. Description: Navajo Weaving. 3' x 2'5". Two Grey Hills area woven from all home spun wool. Woven by Lucy Simpson. Excellent condition. , A Brief Social History of Navajo Weaving and a bit of historical context for a popular contemporary collectible. There is an ageless beauty to Navajo weaving. Navajo weaving's are many things to people. Above all else, Navajo weaving's are masterworks, regardless of whose criteria of art is used to judge them. They are evocative, timeless portraits which, like all good art, transcend time and space. Navajo weaving has captured the imagination of many not only because they are beautiful, well-woven textiles but also because they so accurately mirror the social and economic history of Navajo people. Succinctly, Navajo women wove their life experiences into the pieces. Navajo people tell us they learned to weave from Spider Woman and that the first loom was of sky and earth cords, with weaving tools of sunlight, lightning, white shell, and crystal. Anthropologists speculate Navajos learned to weave from Pueblo people by 1650. There is little doubt Pueblo weaving was already influenced by the Spanish by the time they shared their weaving skills with Navajo people. Spanish influence includes the substitution of wool for cotton, the introduction of indigo (blue) dye, and simple stripe patterning. Besides the "manta" (a wider-than-long wearing blanket), Navajo weavers also made a tunic-like dress, belts, garters, hair ties, men's shirts, breech cloths, and a "serape-style" wearing blanket. These blankets were longer-than-wide and were patterned in brown, blue and white stripes and terraced lines. For more than a century, the products of Navajo looms were probably identical to those of their Pueblo teachers, but by the end of the 1700's Navajo weaving began its divergence. While Pueblo weavers remained conservative, Navajo weavers learned that wefts did not need to be passed through all the warps each time, but rather, by stopping at whatever point they wished they could create patterning other than horizontal bands. These "pauses" in Navajo weaving are often seen as "lazy-lines" (diagonal lines across the horizontal wefts) in finished pieces. By 1800, weavers were using this technique to create terraced lines and discrete design elements. Navajo weavers also demonstrated more willingness to use color than their Pueblo teachers. Spanish documents describing the Southwest in the early 18th century mention Navajo weaving skills. By the 1700s Navajo weaving was an important trade item to the Pueblos and Plains Indian people. In 1844, Santa Fe Trail traveler Josiah Gregg reported, "a singular species of blanket, known as the Serape Navajo which is of so close and dense a texture that it will frequently hold water almost equal to gum-elastic cloth. It is therefore highly prized for protection against the rains. Some of the finer qualities are often sold among the Mexicans as high as fifty or sixty dollars each.", Blankets were traded great distances as evidenced by their appearance in Karl Bodmer's 1833 painting of a Piegan Blackfoot man (Montana) wearing what appears to be a first-phase Chief's blanket or an 1845 sketch of Cheyenne at Bent's Fort (Colorado) wearing striped blankets. Historic photographs illustrate that the desirability of blankets increased with the 19th century. Closer and more frequent trading partners included the Utes, Apaches, Comanches, and Pueblos. The Spanish or Mexicans had never been able to reach a lasting peace with the Navajo. When Mexico ceded the Southwest to the United States in 1848, the "Navajo Problem" was also inherited. With a pronounced resolve, Kit Carson led a "Scorched Earth" campaign in 1863, destroying food caches, herds and orchards, ending in 8000 Navajo people surrendering. They were marched hundreds of miles to an arid, barren reservation, Bosque Redondo, at Fort Sumner in eastern NM. For five years the people endured incarceration with shortages of supplies, food, and water. Their culture changed dramatically during this period, not least in weaving. To substitute for their lost flocks, annuities were paid which included cotton string, commercially-manufactured natural- and aniline-dyed yarns as well as manufactured cloth and blankets. These lessened the Navajo people's reliance on their own loom products. In 1867, four thousand Spanish-made blankets were distributed to the Navajos as part of their annuity payment. The combination of widespread availability of yarns and cloth and the influence of the Spanish Saltillo designs were probably a direct inspiration in the dramatic shift in weaving during the Bosque Redondo years, from the stripes and terraced patterns of the Classic period to the serrate or diamond style of the Transitional period. It is testimony to the resiliency of Navajo culture that a period of internment could produce a robust period of change and continuity in weaving. In 1868, the Navajo were allowed to return to their beloved mesas and canyons. In exchange for their return they promised to cease aggression against neighboring peoples, and to settle and become farmers. Reservation life brought further dramatic changes to Navajo culture, including a growing reliance on American civilization and its products. The sale of weaving's in the next thirty years would provide an essential vehicle for economic change from barter to cash. Annuity goods included yarns, wool cards, indigo dye, aniline dyes, and various kinds of factory woven cloth. Skirts and blouses made of manufactured cloth replaced the woven two-piece blanket dress. Manufactured Pendleton blankets displaced hand-woven mantas and shoulder blankets so that by the 1890's, there was relatively little need for loom products in Navajo society. US government-licensed traders began to establish themselves on the new Navajo Reservation. Whatever their motivation, adventure or commerce, the traders became the chief link between the Navajo and the non-Indian world. Trading posts exchanged goods for Navajo products such as pinon nuts, wool, sheep, jewelry, baskets, and rugs. While wool and sheep were important to Navajo people for weaving and meat, they were also important to the economy beyond the Reservation. Wool was in great demand in the industrialized eastern US for coats, upholstery, and other products. Traders bought wool by the pound and sold it to wool brokers in Albuquerque and Las Vegas, New Mexico. The sheep purchased by traders were herded to the nearest rail head and on to the slaughterhouses. The herds grew substantially and it became more profitable for Navajo people to sell wool rather than utilize it in weaving. The railroad reached Gallup, NM in 1882, establishing a tangible connection between the Navajos and the wider market, with the traders acting as middlemen. The completion of the railroad signaled the closing of the American Frontier which, in turn, stimulated a nationwide interest in collecting American Indian art. The railroad made travel to the vast reaches of the west easier and thus opened the area for tourists. The traders recognized these new markets and began to influence weaving by paying better prices for weaving's they thought more attractive to non-Indian buyers. This new market, coupled with the Navajo's decline in use of their hand woven products, infused new life into Navajo textile arts. By the 1880's, trading posts were well established on the Navajo Reservation, and traders encouraged weaving of floor rugs and patterns using more muted colors which they thought would appeal to the non-Indian market. By 1920, many regional styles of Navajo weaving developed around trading posts. These rugs are often known by the area's trading post's name. The history of Navajo weaving continues; over the past century, Navajo weaving has flourished, maintaining its importance as a vital native art to the present day. Virtually all the nineteenth and twentieth-century styles of blankets and rugs are still woven, and new styles continue to appear. Thanks to Bruce Bernstein, former director, Museum of Indian Arts and Culture, Museum of New Mexico , Santa Fe Originally appeared in The Collector's Guide to Santa Fe and Taos - Volume 11En savoir plus

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Sculpture, Ken Payne, Entitled "Race For The "Stork ", 1/50, Ca 1992, #1342

Description Bronze Sculpture, Sculpture, Ken Payne, Entitled "Race For The "Stork ", Limited Edition, 1/50, Ca 1992, #1342 Description: #1342 Bronze Sculpture, Sculpture, Ken Payne, Entitled "Race For The "Stork ", Limited Edition, 1/50, Ca 1992, Dimensions: 20.5 x 23" x 23" Condition: Excellent, like new Provenance: Jean Oxley Additional Key Payne Sculptures can be found at: https://www.etsy.com/your/shops/CulturalPatina/tools/listings/section:16131018 Following is the obituary of the artist: Ken Payne's story was as unique a story as there ever was. His inquisitive mind led to a passion for his chosen pursuits. He often told stories of his life and experiences fascinating his listeners . A close friend summed it up well, "I've never seen a man with such diversified interests in life." He was a loving husband, a compassionate father, "a brother that is born for when there is distress". (Proverbs 17:17) Ken was respected in the art world as a talented sculptor, painter and businessman, establishing bronze casting foundries here in Lincoln County, as well as Arizona and Colorado. Ken also was the founder of Mountain Trails Gallery, Inc. where he established fine art galleries in Santa Fe, NM and Sedona, AZ. People came from all over the country and the world to hear him tell his stories as he sculpted into bronze the history of the disappearing American west. He touched the hearts of many with his spirited tales of a time he lived in books as a child and from then on. He collected an extensive library, well-worn and stained with paint and clay as he strived to portray with accuracy the fading ways of the cowboys, mountain men, pioneers, and the beloved Native Americans. Before Ken Payne's art career was his flying career, where he became a legend in the flying world. Ken's busy life was never overshadowed by his love for Jehovah God and His son, Jesus Christ. As anyone who spoke with him for any amount of time knew, the subject of a better world through God's arrangement was the dearest thing on his mind. With his family they were privileged to move to the Navajo Reservation to help establish a local congregation. Life with the native Americans gave Ken even more inspiration for his art work, though much less interest for the business aspects of it. Ken is survived by his wife Karen, his children Victor Payne, Paula Morgan, Chris Payne, Jason Reynolds, Jonathan Payne, and Phillip Payne. He is also survived by his brother John Payne, uncle U.S. Belcher, two aunts Billie Elle and Judy Forrester. He was preceded in death by his beloved son Ben Payne. He also has 11 grandchildren, and 5 great grandchildren. The family would like to thank the Ruidoso Police Department, Dina Garner of the Ruidoso News, the Ruidoso Community and Airport, who searched to find Ken and especially all the loved friends and family in the Ruidoso Congregation of Jehovah's Witnesses, and those around the country who have supported us during this difficult time. This biography from the Archives of AskART: Source: http://www.legacy.com/obituaries/ruidosonews/obituary.aspx?n=kenneth-paul-payne&pid=155734211 Biography from The Adobe Fine Art: Ken Payne, born to the ranching heritage of the Southwest, brings the exciting memories of the Old West to life in his heroic bronze sculpture depicting the action, the danger, even the humor of many a frontier situation. Ken is a fan of the great sculptors of the past, especially the Greek and Roman masters. He strives for the same design qualities within his western themes. The bronze sculpture of Ken Payne is shown and collected internationally, and is prized by noted art connoisseurs as well as first-time collectors. His work is followed by thousands more through the nationally televised program, “Sculping with Ken Payne”. Ken’s studio is located in Ruidoso, New Mexico. He is usually found working in public where he enjoys meeting visitors and telling stories of the Old West. Ken is dedicated to authentically and permanently recording for us and generations to come, a dynamic era we can hold in our hands – and our hearts. Ken will usually begin sculpting with a story he wants to tell or a title that captures his imagination. His stories have been included with each bronze and help bring ‘The Old West’ of life. View the other items in my shop: http://www.etsy.com/shop/CulturalPatina?ref=shopsection_shophome_leftnav, Description, Description, Bronze Sculpture, Sculpture, Ken Payne, Entitled "Race For The "Stork ", Limited Edition, 1/50, Ca 1992, #1342 Description: #1342 Bronze Sculpture, Sculpture, Ken Payne, Entitled "Race For The "Stork ", Limited Edition, 1/50, Ca 1992, Dimensions: 20.5 x 23" x 23" Condition: Excellent, like new Provenance: Jean Oxley Additional Key Payne Sculptures can be found at: https://www.etsy.com/your/shops/CulturalPatina/tools/listings/section:16131018 Following is the obituary of the artist: Ken Payne's story was as unique a story as there ever was. His inquisitive mind led to a passion for his chosen pursuits. He often told stories of his life and experiences fascinating his listeners . A close friend summed it up well, "I've never seen a man with such diversified interests in life." He was a loving husband, a compassionate father, "a brother that is born for when there is distress". (Proverbs 17:17) Ken was respected in the art world as a talented sculptor, painter and businessman, establishing bronze casting foundries here in Lincoln County, as well as Arizona and Colorado. Ken also was the founder of Mountain Trails Gallery, Inc. where he established fine art galleries in Santa Fe, NM and Sedona, AZ. People came from all over the country and the world to hear him tell his stories as he sculpted into bronze the history of the disappearing American west. He touched the hearts of many with his spirited tales of a time he lived in books as a child and from then on. He collected an extensive library, well-worn and stained with paint and clay as he strived to portray with accuracy the fading ways of the cowboys, mountain men, pioneers, and the beloved Native Americans. Before Ken Payne's art career was his flying career, where he became a legend in the flying world. Ken's busy life was never overshadowed by his love for Jehovah God and His son, Jesus Christ. As anyone who spoke with him for any amount of time knew, the subject of a better world through God's arrangement was the dearest thing on his mind. With his family they were privileged to move to the Navajo Reservation to help establish a local congregation. Life with the native Americans gave Ken even more inspiration for his art work, though much less interest for the business aspects of it. Ken is survived by his wife Karen, his children Victor Payne, Paula Morgan, Chris Payne, Jason Reynolds, Jonathan Payne, and Phillip Payne. He is also survived by his brother John Payne, uncle U.S. Belcher, two aunts Billie Elle and Judy Forrester. He was preceded in death by his beloved son Ben Payne. He also has 11 grandchildren, and 5 great grandchildren. The family would like to thank the Ruidoso Police Department, Dina Garner of the Ruidoso News, the Ruidoso Community and Airport, who searched to find Ken and especially all the loved friends and family in the Ruidoso Congregation of Jehovah's Witnesses, and those around the country who have supported us during this difficult time. This biography from the Archives of AskART: Source: http://www.legacy.com/obituaries/ruidosonews/obituary.aspx?n=kenneth-paul-payne&pid=155734211 Biography from The Adobe Fine Art: Ken Payne, born to the ranching heritage of the Southwest, brings the exciting memories of the Old West to life in his heroic bronze sculpture depicting the action, the danger, even the humor of many a frontier situation. Ken is a fan of the great sculptors of the past, especially the Greek and Roman masters. He strives for the same design qualities within his western themes. The bronze sculpture of Ken Payne is shown and collected internationally, and is prized by noted art connoisseurs as well as first-time collectors. His work is followed by thousands more through the nationally televised program, “Sculping with Ken Payne”. Ken’s studio is located in Ruidoso, New Mexico. He is usually found working in public where he enjoys meeting visitors and telling stories of the Old West. Ken is dedicated to authentically and permanently recording for us and generations to come, a dynamic era we can hold in our hands – and our hearts. Ken will usually begin sculpting with a story he wants to tell or a title that captures his imagination. His stories have been included with each bronze and help bring ‘The Old West’ of life. View the other items in my shop: http://www.etsy.com/shop/CulturalPatina?ref=shopsection_shophome_leftnav, https://www.etsy.com/your/shops/CulturalPatina/tools/listings/section:16131018, http://www.etsy.com/shop/CulturalPatina?ref=shopsection_shophome_leftnavEn savoir plus

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Jeff Wolf, Entitled "Surround", Limited Edition, Pre Cast, 1 of 10, #1017

Western Bronze by Renowned Western Artist Jeff Wolf, Entitled "Surround" Precast Limited Edition, Cast to Order, 1 of 10, Precast #1017 Description: Western Bronze Sculpture, by Renowned Western Artist Jeff Wolf, Entitled "Surround":, Limited Edition, Cast To Order, 1 of 10, 

From childhood the American Indian has always fascinated me. They lived such a pure and free life. Their methods of hunting held a special fascination. I began to study all the different ways the Indian attained his food and came across the "surround". This seemed to be a very interesting and practical means of harvesting Bison meat. Later on, in my cowboy career, I managed a buffalo ranch in northwestern Colorado. It was here that I learned much more about the habits of the Bison, including how to stop a herd of running buffalo. If the Bison could be wrangled into milling in a circle, they could be kept circling for quite some time, or until they came to a stop.

It was about then, that I started dreaming about "The Surround”. That was sixteen years ago. Over this period, my "Surround" dream became a reoccurring event Eventually I could see every detail. One night during the dream a voice came and said it was time the story was told. Nine months after that, "The Surround" was completed.

The thought of cruelty, or brutal killing never crossed my mind. To the Indian there was no right or wrong in this either -- only the need to survive. The buffalo was simply given to the people by the Great Spirit, for their survival. What I focused on was the drama, bravery and skill as well as what it must have been like to be on the open plains facing a pray that was much stronger, faster, and often times more agile than the horses they were riding. The slightest mistake might mean injury or even death. 

In my dream, I pictured three Indians riding across the open plains in search of a small herd of buffalo feeding away from the main herd. When the right opportunity presented itself, the Indians started circling the herd until they had it running in a tight circle. As the animals milled in a state of panic, the hunters began their harvesting. They continued this till they had taken all that their band could use. Then the remainder of the herd was set free to rejoin the main herd.

This method of hunting proved to be one of the most successful, and least hazardous. Dimensions: 22” H x 46” , Approximately 150 pounds Condition: Cast to Order: On all precast orders we ask for a deposit of 75%, this covers the molds and first casting. Precast orders are purchased before the sculpture has been molded and cast in bronze. This feature allows the client to get in on the ground floor of early edition numbers while saving a considerable amount over retail. Once the work is cast in bronze and is on the retail market the price does not decrease. On orders that need to be cast we require a 50% deposit with the remainder due upon completion of the piece. Shipping and insurance are the reprehensibility of the purchaser. Delivery is usually 8-10 weeks from time of order. Provenance: Jeff Wolf Biography of Jeff Wolf and Achievements Follow: Persistence makes perfect: The trail to the top of the Western Art world is steep and narrow. It is littered with obstacles, beset with sheer drop-offs, and hindered by unexpected twists and turns. Sculptor Jeff Wolf has ridden that trail for more than twenty-five years and reached heights few artists attain. Along the way he has placed bronzes in prominent museums and permanent exhibits, in prestigious private collections, and on display in public venues. He has been bestowed with honors and awards, recognized in juried competitions, and called upon to teach and demonstrate. Western Bronze by Renowned Western Artist Jeff Wolf, Entitled "Surround" Precast Limited Edition, Cast to Order, 1 of 10, Precast #1017 Description: Western Bronze Sculpture, by Renowned Western Artist Jeff Wolf, Entitled "Surround":, Limited Edition, Cast To Order, 1 of 10, 

From childhood the American Indian has always fascinated me. They lived such a pure and free life. Their methods of hunting held a special fascination. I began to study all the different ways the Indian attained his food and came across the "surround". This seemed to be a very interesting and practical means of harvesting Bison meat. Later on, in my cowboy career, I managed a buffalo ranch in northwestern Colorado. It was here that I learned much more about the habits of the Bison, including how to stop a herd of running buffalo. If the Bison could be wrangled into milling in a circle, they could be kept circling for quite some time, or until they came to a stop.

It was about then, that I started dreaming about "The Surround”. That was sixteen years ago. Over this period, my "Surround" dream became a reoccurring event Eventually I could see every detail. One night during the dream a voice came and said it was time the story was told. Nine months after that, "The Surround" was completed.

The thought of cruelty, or brutal killing never crossed my mind. To the Indian there was no right or wrong in this either -- only the need to survive. The buffalo was simply given to the people by the Great Spirit, for their survival. What I focused on was the drama, bravery and skill as well as what it must have been like to be on the open plains facing a pray that was much stronger, faster, and often times more agile than the horses they were riding. The slightest mistake might mean injury or even death. 

In my dream, I pictured three Indians riding across the open plains in search of a small herd of buffalo feeding away from the main herd. When the right opportunity presented itself, the Indians started circling the herd until they had it running in a tight circle. As the animals milled in a state of panic, the hunters began their harvesting. They continued this till they had taken all that their band could use. Then the remainder of the herd was set free to rejoin the main herd.

This method of hunting proved to be one of the most successful, and least hazardous. Dimensions: 22” H x 46” , Approximately 150 pounds Condition: Cast to Order: On all precast orders we ask for a deposit of 75%, this covers the molds and first casting. Precast orders are purchased before the sculpture has been molded and cast in bronze. This feature allows the client to get in on the ground floor of early edition numbers while saving a considerable amount over retail. Once the work is cast in bronze and is on the retail market the price does not decrease. On orders that need to be cast we require a 50% deposit with the remainder due upon completion of the piece. Shipping and insurance are the reprehensibility of the purchaser. Delivery is usually 8-10 weeks from time of order. Provenance: Jeff Wolf Biography of Jeff Wolf and Achievements Follow: Persistence makes perfect: The trail to the top of the Western Art world is steep and narrow. It is littered with obstacles, beset with sheer drop-offs, and hindered by unexpected twists and turns. Sculptor Jeff Wolf has ridden that trail for more than twenty-five years and reached heights few artists attain. Along the way he has placed bronzes in prominent museums and permanent exhibits, in prestigious private collections, and on display in public venues. He has been bestowed with honors and awards, recognized in juried competitions, and called upon to teach and demonstrateEn savoir plus

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Traditional Western Art, "A Long Way Down", by Linda Gulinson, #1360

Traditional Western Art, "A Long Way Down", by Linda Gulinson, #1360 Description: #1360 Traditional Western Art, "A Long Way Down", by Linda Gulinson. On top of a very large horse, this Lakota child has to master her horsemanship but it can be a little scary at times. Dimensions: 16" x 13" Condition: Excellent Information on her follows in her own words, I graduated college Magna Cum Laude. I entered a number of shows and won a number of awards, During this period, I was awarded The Pastel Society Of America’s most prestigious award, one year’s free tuition to the Art Students League of New York. We worked that out even though we lived in Denver at the time. Both during my pastel years and onto oils, I have done a number of commissions of people, places and dogs. Some of my European and dog images are shown in the Archival Category. As inferred above, I expanded to oils and studied about fifty individual weeks with some the country’s finest Western artists, including two Master Classes with Howard Terpning . I have enjoyed figurative paintings, particularly of the West including cowboys, horses, children and especially Native Americans. I have sought to depict the inner beauty and character of my subjects and have had the good fortune to appeal to buyers and collectors of my work. I have been in Western Art Collector’s “The State of Art in Colorado” as well as being recognized in the Editorial Section. The book “Art Of The American West” by Linscott and Christensen-Duff displayed my work. Four times, my images have appeared on the cover of “Ranch And Country” magazine. Works of mine have appeared on the front and back inside cover of The New Mexico Guide, and recently, an image of mine appeared in ”Dallas Style and Design”. I have appeared in several museum shows in Cheyenne, Wy., wherein I sold well and gained several collectors. Sometimes life comes full circle. I have always loved art and in grade school was placed in an adult class taught by instructors from The Chicago Art Institute. My forte was figurative, but now that I am transitioning into modern, contemporary and even abstract art, I can explore my love of color and composition. On a personal note, we moved from Denver to Peoria, Arizona, to be with nine of our ten grandchildren and three of our four sons. Traditional Western Art, "A Long Way Down", by Linda Gulinson, #1360 Description: #1360 Traditional Western Art, "A Long Way Down", by Linda Gulinson. On top of a very large horse, this Lakota child has to master her horsemanship but it can be a little scary at times. On top of a very large horse, this Lakota child has to master her horsemanship but it can be a little scary at times. Dimensions: 16" x 13" Condition: Excellent Information on her follows in her own words, I graduated college Magna Cum Laude. I entered a number of shows and won a number of awards, During this period, I was awarded The Pastel Society Of America’s most prestigious award, one year’s free tuition to the Art Students League of New York. We worked that out even though we lived in Denver at the time. Both during my pastel years and onto oils, I have done a number of commissions of people, places and dogs. Some of my European and dog images are shown in the Archival Category. As inferred above, I expanded to oils and studied about fifty individual weeks with some the country’s finest Western artists, including two Master Classes with Howard Terpning . I have enjoyed figurative paintings, particularly of the West including cowboys, horses, children and especially Native Americans. I have sought to depict the inner beauty and character of my subjects and have had the good fortune to appeal to buyers and collectors of my work. I have been in Western Art Collector’s “The State of Art in Colorado” as well as being recognized in the Editorial Section. The book “Art Of The American West” by Linscott and Christensen-Duff displayed my work. Four times, my images have appeared on the cover of “Ranch And Country” magazine. Works of mine have appeared on the front and back inside cover of The New Mexico Guide, and recently, an image of mine appeared in ”Dallas Style and Design”. I have appeared in several museum shows in Cheyenne, Wy., wherein I sold well and gained several collectors. Sometimes life comes full circle. I have always loved art and in grade school was placed in an adult class taught by instructors from The Chicago Art Institute. My forte was figurative, but now that I am transitioning into modern, contemporary and even abstract art, I can explore my love of color and composition. On a personal note, we moved from Denver to Peoria, Arizona, to be with nine of our ten grandchildren and three of our four sonsEn savoir plus

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Santa Domingo : Outstanding Santa Domingo Dough Bowl by Alvina Garcia #257

Santa Domingo 257. Description: Santa Domingo Dough bowl by Alvina Garcia Dimensions: 5 & 1/2 in. high x 12 in diameter. Condition: Slight scratches, spalling, but overall in very good condition for it's age. Alvina Garcia special focus was on polychrome and black on cream jars, vases, and dough bowls. Her work is in the following collections: Wright Collection, Peabody Museum, Harvard University, and Cambridge, MA. Here favorite designs were leaves, butterflies, and deer. She is in several publications including: ayes and Blom 1996, and Drooker et al, 1998. (Source: Schaaf, Southern Pueblo Pottery, 2,000 Artist Biographies. ‰ÛÏPueblo pottery is made using a coiled technique that came into northern Arizona and New Mexico from the south, some 1500 years ago. In the four-corners region of the US, nineteen pueblos and villages have historically produced pottery. Although each of these pueblos use similar traditional methods of coiling, shaping, finishing and firing, the pottery from each is distinctive. Various clays gathered from each pueblo‰۪s local sources produce pottery colors that range from buff to earthy yellows, oranges, and reds, as well as black. Fired pots are sometimes left plain and other times decorated‰ÛÓmost frequently with paint and occasionally with appliqu̩. Painted designs vary from pueblo to pueblo, yet share an ancient iconography based on abstract representations of clouds, rain, feathers, birds, plants, animals and other natural world features. Tempering materials and paints, also from natural sources, contribute further to the distinctiveness of each pueblo‰۪s pottery. Some paints are derived from plants, others from minerals. Before firing, potters in some pueblos apply a light colored slip to their pottery, which creates a bright background for painted designs or simply a lighter color plain ware vessel. Designs are painted on before firing, traditionally with a brush fashioned from yucca fiber. Different combinations of paint color, clay color, and slips are characteristic of different pueblos. Among them are black on cream, black on buff, black on red, dark brown and dark red on white (as found in Zuni pottery), matte red on red, and polychrome‰ÛÓa number of natural colors on one vessel (most typically associated with Hopi). Pueblo potters also produce undecorated polished black ware, black on black ware, and carved red and carved black wares. Making pueblo pottery is a time-consuming effort that includes gathering and preparing the clay, building and shaping the coiled pot, gathering plants to make the colored dyes, constructing yucca brushes, and, often, making a clay slip. While some Pueblo artists fire in kilns, most still fire in the traditional way in an outside fire pit, covering their vessels with large potsherds and dried sheep dung. Pottery is left to bake for many hours, producing a high-fired result. Today, Pueblo potters continue to honor this centuries-old tradition of hand-coiled pottery production, yet value the need for contemporary artistic expression as well. They continue to improve their style, methods and designs, often combining traditional and contemporary techniques to create striking new works of art.‰۝, Santa Domingo, 257. Description: Santa Domingo Dough bowl by Alvina Garcia Dimensions: 5 & 1/2 in. high x 12 in diameter. Condition: Slight scratches, spalling, but overall in very good condition for it's age. Alvina Garcia special focus was on polychrome and black on cream jars, vases, and dough bowls. Her work is in the following collections: Wright Collection, Peabody Museum, Harvard University, and Cambridge, MA. Here favorite designs were leaves, butterflies, and deer. She is in several publications including: ayes and Blom 1996, and Drooker et al, 1998. (Source: Schaaf, Southern Pueblo Pottery, 2,000 Artist Biographies. ‰ÛÏPueblo pottery is made using a coiled technique that came into northern Arizona and New Mexico from the south, some 1500 years ago. In the four-corners region of the US, nineteen pueblos and villages have historically produced pottery. Although each of these pueblos use similar traditional methods of coiling, shaping, finishing and firing, the pottery from each is distinctive. Various clays gathered from each pueblo‰۪s local sources produce pottery colors that range from buff to earthy yellows, oranges, and reds, as well as black. Fired pots are sometimes left plain and other times decorated‰ÛÓmost frequently with paint and occasionally with appliqu̩. Painted designs vary from pueblo to pueblo, yet share an ancient iconography based on abstract representations of clouds, rain, feathers, birds, plants, animals and other natural world features. Tempering materials and paints, also from natural sources, contribute further to the distinctiveness of each pueblo‰۪s pottery. Some paints are derived from plants, others from minerals. Before firing, potters in some pueblos apply a light colored slip to their pottery, which creates a bright background for painted designs or simply a lighter color plain ware vessel. Designs are painted on before firing, traditionally with a brush fashioned from yucca fiber. Different combinations of paint color, clay color, and slips are characteristic of different pueblos. Among them are black on cream, black on buff, black on red, dark brown and dark red on white (as found in Zuni pottery), matte red on red, and polychrome‰ÛÓa number of natural colors on one vessel (most typically associated with Hopi). Pueblo potters also produce undecorated polished black ware, black on black ware, and carved red and carved black wares. Making pueblo pottery is a time-consuming effort that includes gathering and preparing the clay, building and shaping the coiled pot, gathering plants to make the colored dyes, constructing yucca brushes, and, often, making a clay slip. While some Pueblo artists fire in kilns, most still fire in the traditional way in an outside fire pit, covering their vessels with large potsherds and dried sheep dung. Pottery is left to bake for many hours, producing a high-fired result. Today, Pueblo potters continue to honor this centuries-old tradition of hand-coiled pottery production, yet value the need for contemporary artistic expression as well. They continue to improve their style, methods and designs, often combining traditional and contemporary techniques to create striking new works of art.‰۝En savoir plus

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Vintage Konyak Naga Massive Extra long And Heavy Red Glass Bead Necklace #565

Long Necklace Authentic Vintage Konyak Naga Massive Extra Long and Heavy Red Glass Bead Necklace 565. Authentic Vintage Konyak Naga Massive Extra long And Heavy Red Glass Bead Necklace. Impressive classic red bead necklace worn by a man or woman of considerable status. The piece has 130 Strands of beads, is 34" long and in good condition for its use and age estimated to be early to late 19th century. The clasp is an old Indian coin. Please note that the designation Authentic means that the piece was made by the Nagas and used by them in their actual ceremonies and not made for tourists. The Konyak are a Naga people, and are recognized among other Naga by their tattoos, which they have all over their face and hands; facial tattoos were earned for taking an enemy's head. They are called the land of Angh's. They have the largest population among the Nagas. The Konyaks can be found in Myanmar, in the Tirap and Changlang districts of Arunachal, and in the Mon district of Nagaland, India. They are known in Arunachal as Wancho Konyak. The Konyak language belongs to the Northern Naga subbranch of the Sal subfamily of Sino-Tibetan. Known as head hunters of North East India. In the recent past, they were known as war loving and often attacked nearby villages of other tribes taking the heads of opposing warriors as trophies to hang in the Morong (a communal house). The number of heads indicated the power of a warrior and the tribe and becomes a collective totem. With the exception of these behaviors, the tribal members maintain a much disciplined community life with strict duties and responsibilities for every individual. Nagaland has a rich diversity of ethnic groups, languages and religions. More than 80% of the population lives in small, isolated villages and practice their own rituals and traditions that have been existing since centuries. The Nagas are said to belong to the Indo-Mongoloid stock, a race whose presence was first noted ten centuries before Christ, at the time of the compilation of the Vedas. The Nagas are mostly Christians. Naga Features: The Nagas are usually medium sized. The nose is flat, eyes curved, complexion fair, and hair straight. Men are muscular and women are usually short. One unique feature of the Nagas is that they wear conical red headgear decorated with wild boar canine teeth and white black Hornbill feathers, the spear with the shaft decorated with red black hairs and the unique dao with broad blade and long handle. Both men and women wear traditional Naga jewelry. Naga shawls are very famous among the tribes. Tattooing is customary among the tribes. Nagaland Culture The tribes of Nagaland are unique in their culture and traditions. The tribes are excellent and skilled craftsmen. Naga tribes are known for being hard working and laborious. They are known for making exquisite bamboo and cane products, weaving and wood carving. The Nagas are expert in basketry, weaving, wood carving, pottery and metal work. Agriculture is the main occupation of the people. Rice, millet and Taro potato are grown by the people. The tribes of Nagaland are very fond of dance and music. Music forms an essential parts of their lives. There are different traditional dances and music of the different tribes. The music of is characterized by folk songs and music accentuated by traditional instruments. People of Nagaland are also famous for celebrating numerous seasonal fairs and festivals. All the tribes celebrate their own distinct festivals with dance and music. The most important festivals celebrated by the tribes include Sekrenyi, Moatsu Mong, Suhkruhnye, Bushu, Yemshe, and Metumniu among others. The food of the Naga tribe consist of rice, millet, vegetables, fish, meat, Naga chilly and chutney. Nagaland Village System: The tribes live mainly in villages. For the Nagas family is the most important institution. Women are treated equally with men. Nagas are traditionally and tribally organized with a strong warrior tradition. Head hunting is an important aspect of the people. Most of the houses of the Nagas have skull displaying their warrior qualities. Different Tribes of Nagaland: Nagaland is home to some 16 different kinds of tribes with distinct and fascinating cultures. Each of the Naga tribe is divided into as many as twenty clans. The Nagas speak 60 different dialects. The prominent tribes are Angami, Ao, Chakhesang, Chang, Khiamniungan, Konyak, Lotha, Pochury, Phom, Poumai, Rongmei Naga, Rengma, Sangtam, Sema, Mao and Zeliang among many others. The languages of the Nagas may vary from Angami-Pochury, Ao, Kukish, Sal, Tangkhul and Zeme branches of Tibeto Burman. Some important tribes are: Angami Naga: The Angami Nagas are one of the major tribes of Nagaland. The Angamis mainly celebrate the Sekrenyi festival. They are basically hill people and depend on agriculture for their mode of livelihood. 98 % of the Angamis are Christians. Ao Naga: Ao Nagas are another major tribes in Nagaland. They reside mainly in Tsula to Tsurang in Mokokchung district. The Ao Nagas are known for the celebration of different harvest festivals. The Aos are primarily Christians. Chang: Changs are one of the recognized Scheduled Tribes in India. The traditional territory of the Chang lies in the Central Tuensang district. About 99 % of the Changs are Christians. They speak the Chang language and the Chang people are very fond of music and dance. They celebrate Christmas, Naknyu Lem, Poang Lem, Jeinyu Leam and so many other festivals with fanfare and gaiety. Konyak: Konyak have the largest populations among the Nagas. They are found in the Mon district of Nagaland. They are famous for their tattoos all over their faces and hands. Lotha: Lotha is also a major Naga tribe and reside in the Wokha district. They are popular for traditional dance and folk songs. Sumi: Sumi Nagas are one of the major Naga tribes. They mainly inhabit in the Zunheboto district. 99 % of the Sumis are Christians. Tuluni and Ahuna are the most important festivals of the Sumis. Yimchunger: Yimchunger is a minor Naga group. Metmneo festival is celebrated by the Yimchunge people. Khiamniungan: Khiamniungan is comparatively a minor Naga group. They mainly reside in the Tuensang district in Nagaland. Miu festival and Tsokum festival are the most important festivals celebrated by this tribal group. (Source: India on line) Tangkhul: Tangkhul is a Naga tribe living in the Indo-Burma border area occupying the Ukhrul district in Manipur, India and the Somra Tangkhul hills (Somra tract) in Upper Burma. Despite this international border, many Tangkhul have continued to regard themselves as "one nation".[1] Further reading Stirn, Aglaja & Peter van Ham. The Hidden world of the Naga: Living Traditions in Northeast India. London: Prestel. Oppitz, Michael, Thomas Kaiser, Alban von Stockhausen & Marion Wettstein. 2008. Naga Identities: Changing Local Cultures in the Northeast of India. Gent: Snoeck Publishers. Kunz, Richard & Vibha Joshi. 2008. Naga A Forgotten Mountain Region Rediscovered. Basel: Merian. Alban von Stockhausen: Imag (in) ing the Nagas: The Pictorial Ethnography of Hans-Eberhard Kauffmann and Christoph von FÌ_rer-Haimendorf. Arnoldsche, Stuttgart 2014, ISBN 978-3-89790-412-5. (Source: Times of India), Long Necklace, Authentic Vintage Konyak Naga Massive Extra Long and Heavy Red Glass Bead Necklace, 565. Authentic Vintage Konyak Naga Massive Extra long And Heavy Red Glass Bead Necklace. Impressive classic red bead necklace worn by a man or woman of considerable status. The piece has 130 Strands of beads, is 34" long and in good condition for its use and age estimated to be early to late 19th century. The clasp is an old Indian coin. Please note that the designation Authentic means that the piece was made by the Nagas and used by them in their actual ceremonies and not made for tourists. The Konyak are a Naga people, and are recognized among other Naga by their tattoos, which they have all over their face and hands; facial tattoos were earned for taking an enemy's head. They are called the land of Angh's. They have the largest population among the Nagas. The Konyaks can be found in Myanmar, in the Tirap and Changlang districts of Arunachal, and in the Mon district of Nagaland, India. They are known in Arunachal as Wancho Konyak. The Konyak language belongs to the Northern Naga subbranch of the Sal subfamily of Sino-Tibetan. Known as head hunters of North East India. In the recent past, they were known as war loving and often attacked nearby villages of other tribes taking the heads of opposing warriors as trophies to hang in the Morong (a communal house). The number of heads indicated the power of a warrior and the tribe and becomes a collective totem. With the exception of these behaviors, the tribal members maintain a much disciplined community life with strict duties and responsibilities for every individual. Nagaland has a rich diversity of ethnic groups, languages and religions. More than 80% of the population lives in small, isolated villages and practice their own rituals and traditions that have been existing since centuries. The Nagas are said to belong to the Indo-Mongoloid stock, a race whose presence was first noted ten centuries before Christ, at the time of the compilation of the Vedas. The Nagas are mostly Christians. Naga Features: The Nagas are usually medium sized. The nose is flat, eyes curved, complexion fair, and hair straight. Men are muscular and women are usually short. One unique feature of the Nagas is that they wear conical red headgear decorated with wild boar canine teeth and white black Hornbill feathers, the spear with the shaft decorated with red black hairs and the unique dao with broad blade and long handle. Both men and women wear traditional Naga jewelry. Naga shawls are very famous among the tribes. Tattooing is customary among the tribes. Nagaland Culture, The tribes of Nagaland are unique in their culture and traditions. The tribes are excellent and skilled craftsmen. Naga tribes are known for being hard working and laborious. They are known for making exquisite bamboo and cane products, weaving and wood carving. The Nagas are expert in basketry, weaving, wood carving, pottery and metal work. Agriculture is the main occupation of the people. Rice, millet and Taro potato are grown by the people. The tribes of Nagaland are very fond of dance and music. Music forms an essential parts of their lives. There are different traditional dances and music of the different tribes. The music of is characterized by folk songs and music accentuated by traditional instruments. People of Nagaland are also famous for celebrating numerous seasonal fairs and festivals. All the tribes celebrate their own distinct festivals with dance and music. The most important festivals celebrated by the tribes include Sekrenyi, Moatsu Mong, Suhkruhnye, Bushu, Yemshe, and Metumniu among others. The food of the Naga tribe consist of rice, millet, vegetables, fish, meat, Naga chilly and chutney. Nagaland Village System: The tribes live mainly in villages. For the Nagas family is the most important institution. Women are treated equally with men. Nagas are traditionally and tribally organized with a strong warrior tradition. Head hunting is an important aspect of the people. Most of the houses of the Nagas have skull displaying their warrior qualities. Different Tribes of Nagaland: Nagaland is home to some 16 different kinds of tribes with distinct and fascinating cultures. Each of the Naga tribe is divided into as many as twenty clans. The Nagas speak 60 different dialects. The prominent tribes are Angami, Ao, Chakhesang, Chang, Khiamniungan, Konyak, Lotha, Pochury, Phom, Poumai, Rongmei Naga, Rengma, Sangtam, Sema, Mao and Zeliang among many others. The languages of the Nagas may vary from Angami-Pochury, Ao, Kukish, Sal, Tangkhul and Zeme branches of Tibeto Burman. Some important tribes are:, Angami Naga: The Angami Nagas are one of the major tribes of Nagaland. The Angamis mainly celebrate the Sekrenyi festival. They are basically hill people and depend on agriculture for their mode of livelihood. 98 % of the Angamis are Christians. Ao Naga: Ao Nagas are another major tribes in Nagaland. They reside mainly in Tsula to Tsurang in Mokokchung district. The Ao Nagas are known for the celebration of different harvest festivals. The Aos are primarily Christians. Chang: Changs are one of the recognized Scheduled Tribes in India. The traditional territory of the Chang lies in the Central Tuensang district. About 99 % of the Changs are Christians. They speak the Chang language and the Chang people are very fond of music and dance. They celebrate Christmas, Naknyu Lem, Poang Lem, Jeinyu Leam and so many other festivals with fanfare and gaiety. Konyak: Konyak have the largest populations among the Nagas. They are found in the Mon district of Nagaland. They are famous for their tattoos all over their faces and hands. Lotha: Lotha is also a major Naga tribe and reside in the Wokha district. They are popular for traditional dance and folk songs. Sumi: Sumi Nagas are one of the major Naga tribes. They mainly inhabit in the Zunheboto district. 99 % of the Sumis are Christians. Tuluni and Ahuna are the most important festivals of the Sumis. Yimchunger: Yimchunger is a minor Naga group. Metmneo festival is celebrated by the Yimchunge people. Khiamniungan: Khiamniungan is comparatively a minor Naga group. They mainly reside in the Tuensang district in Nagaland. Miu festival and Tsokum festival are the most important festivals celebrated by this tribal group. (Source: India on line), Tangkhul: Tangkhul is a Naga tribe living in the Indo-Burma border area occupying the Ukhrul district in Manipur, India and the Somra Tangkhul hills (Somra tract) in Upper Burma. Despite this international border, many Tangkhul have continued to regard themselves as "one nation".[1], Further reading, Stirn, Aglaja & Peter van Ham. The Hidden world of the Naga: Living Traditions in Northeast India. London: Prestel. Oppitz, Michael, Thomas Kaiser, Alban von Stockhausen & Marion Wettstein. 2008. Naga Identities: Changing Local Cultures in the Northeast of India. Gent: Snoeck Publishers. Kunz, Richard & Vibha Joshi. 2008. Naga A Forgotten Mountain Region Rediscovered. Basel: Merian. Alban von Stockhausen: Imag (in) ing the Nagas: The Pictorial Ethnography of Hans-Eberhard Kauffmann and Christoph von FÌ_rer-Haimendorf. Arnoldsche, Stuttgart 2014, ISBN 978-3-89790-412-5. (Source: Times of India)En savoir plus

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Bronze Sculpture: Kenneth Payne, "Wintertime of the Buffalo", 43/45

718. Description: Bronze Sculpture by Ken Payne, "Wintertime of the Buffalo", created 1990, 43/45. Signed Dimensions: 17" x 21" x 5" (43.18cm x 53.34cm x 12.70cm) Condition: Excellent Provenance: Margaret Neil Additional Key Payne Sculptures can be found at: https://www.etsy.com/your/shops/CulturalPatina/tools/listings/section:16131018 Following is the obituary of the artist: Ken Payne's story was as unique a story as there ever was. His inquisitive mind led to a passion for his chosen pursuits. He often told stories of his life and experiences fascinating his listeners . A close friend summed it up well, "I've never seen a man with such diversified interests in life." He was a loving husband, a compassionate father, "a brother that is born for when there is distress". (Proverbs 17:17) Ken was respected in the art world as a talented sculptor, painter and businessman, establishing bronze casting foundries here in Lincoln County, as well as Arizona and Colorado. Ken also was the founder of Mountain Trails Gallery, Inc. where he established fine art galleries in Santa Fe, NM and Sedona, AZ. People came from all over the country and the world to hear him tell his stories as he sculpted into bronze the history of the disappearing American west. He touched the hearts of many with his spirited tales of a time he lived in books as a child and from then on. He collected an extensive library, well-worn and stained with paint and clay as he strived to portray with accuracy the fading ways of the cowboys, mountain men, pioneers, and the beloved Native Americans. Before Ken Payne's art career was his flying career, where he became a legend in the flying world. Ken's busy life was never overshadowed by his love for Jehovah God and His son, Jesus Christ. As anyone who spoke with him for any amount of time knew, the subject of a better world through God's arrangement was the dearest thing on his mind. With his family they were privileged to move to the Navajo Reservation to help establish a local congregation. Life with the native Americans gave Ken even more inspiration for his art work, though much less interest for the business aspects of it. Ken is survived by his wife Karen, his children Victor Payne, Paula Morgan, Chris Payne, Jason Reynolds, Jonathan Payne, and Phillip Payne. He is also survived by his brother John Payne, uncle U.S. Belcher, two aunts Billie Elle and Judy Forrester. He was preceded in death by his beloved son Ben Payne. He also has 11 grandchildren, and 5 great grandchildren. The family would like to thank the Ruidoso Police Department, Dina Garner of the Ruidoso News, the Ruidoso Community and Airport, who searched to find Ken and especially all the loved friends and family in the Ruidoso Congregation of Jehovah's Witnesses, and those around the country who have supported us during this difficult time. This biography from the Archives of AskART: Source: http://www.legacy.com/obituaries/ruidosonews/obituary.aspx?n=kenneth-paul-payne&pid=155734211 Biography from The Adobe Fine Art: Ken Payne, born to the ranching heritage of the Southwest, brings the exciting memories of the Old West to life in his heroic bronze sculpture depicting the action, the danger, even the humor of many a frontier situation. Ken is a fan of the great sculptors of the past, especially the Greek and Roman masters. He strives for the same design qualities within his western themes. The bronze sculpture of Ken Payne is shown and collected internationally, and is prized by noted art connoisseurs as well as first-time collectors. His work is followed by thousands more through the nationally televised program, Sculping with Ken Payne. Ken's studio is located in Ruidoso, New Mexico. He is usually found working in public where he enjoys meeting visitors and telling stories of the Old West. Ken is dedicated to authentically and permanently recording for us and generations to come, a dynamic era we can hold in our hands and our hearts. Ken will usually begin sculpting with a story he wants to tell or a title that captures his imagination. His stories have been included with each bronze and help bring The Old West of life. View the other items in my shop: http://www.etsy.com/shop/CulturalPatina?ref=shopsection_shophome_leftnav, 718. Description: Bronze Sculpture by Ken Payne, "Wintertime of the Buffalo", created 1990, 43/45. Signed, Dimensions: 17" x 21" x 5" (43.18cm x 53.34cm x 12.70cm), Condition: Excellent, Provenance: Margaret Neil Additional Key Payne Sculptures can be found at: https://www.etsy.com/your/shops/CulturalPatina/tools/listings/section:16131018 Following is the obituary of the artist:, Ken Payne's story was as unique a story as there ever was. His inquisitive mind led to a passion for his chosen pursuits. He often told stories of his life and experiences fascinating his listeners . A close friend summed it up well, "I've never seen a man with such diversified interests in life." He was a loving husband, a compassionate father, "a brother that is born for when there is distress". (Proverbs 17:17), Ken was respected in the art world as a talented sculptor, painter and businessman, establishing bronze casting foundries here in Lincoln County, as well as Arizona and Colorado. Ken also was the founder of Mountain Trails Gallery, Inc. where he established fine art galleries in Santa Fe, NM and Sedona, AZ. People came from all over the country and the world to hear him tell his stories as he sculpted into bronze the history of the disappearing American west. He touched the hearts of many with his spirited tales of a time he lived in books as a child and from then on. He collected an extensive library, well-worn and stained with paint and clay as he strived to portray with accuracy the fading ways of the cowboys, mountain men, pioneers, and the beloved Native Americans. Before Ken Payne's art career was his flying career, where he became a legend in the flying world. Ken's busy life was never overshadowed by his love for Jehovah God and His son, Jesus Christ. As anyone who spoke with him for any amount of time knew, the subject of a better world through God's arrangement was the dearest thing on his mind. With his family they were privileged to move to the Navajo Reservation to help establish a local congregation. Life with the native Americans gave Ken even more inspiration for his art work, though much less interest for the business aspects of it. Ken is survived by his wife Karen, his children Victor Payne, Paula Morgan, Chris Payne, Jason Reynolds, Jonathan Payne, and Phillip Payne. He is also survived by his brother John Payne, uncle U.S. Belcher, two aunts Billie Elle and Judy Forrester. He was preceded in death by his beloved son Ben Payne. He also has 11 grandchildren, and 5 great grandchildren. The family would like to thank the Ruidoso Police Department, Dina Garner of the Ruidoso News, the Ruidoso Community and Airport, who searched to find Ken and especially all the loved friends and family in the Ruidoso Congregation of Jehovah's Witnesses, and those around the country who have supported us during this difficult time. This biography from the Archives of AskART: Source: http://www.legacy.com/obituaries/ruidosonews/obituary.aspx?n=kenneth-paul-payne&pid=155734211 Biography from The Adobe Fine Art: Ken Payne, born to the ranching heritage of the Southwest, brings the exciting memories of the Old West to life in his heroic bronze sculpture depicting the action, the danger, even the humor of many a frontier situation. Ken is a fan of the great sculptors of the past, especially the Greek and Roman masters. He strives for the same design qualities within his western themes. The bronze sculpture of Ken Payne is shown and collected internationally, and is prized by noted art connoisseurs as well as first-time collectors. His work is followed by thousands more through the nationally televised program, Sculping with Ken Payne. Ken's studio is located in Ruidoso, New Mexico. He is usually found working in public where he enjoys meeting visitors and telling stories of the Old West. Ken is dedicated to authentically and permanently recording for us and generations to come, a dynamic era we can hold in our hands and our hearts. Ken will usually begin sculpting with a story he wants to tell or a title that captures his imagination. His stories have been included with each bronze and help bring The Old West of life. View the other items in my shop: http://www.etsy.com/shop/CulturalPatina?ref=shopsection_shophome_leftnavEn savoir plus

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Native American Historic Acoma Pottery Jar #144

Native American Historic Acoma Pottery Jar 144. Description: Native American, Historic Acoma Pottery Jar, Exquisite, large vintage pottery jar done in poly chrome with parrot figures, floral's, and more traditional geometric designs. Very good well-used condition. Large beautiful piece! Dimensions: 9-1/2" x 9-1/2" Date: Ca. 1940's. A History of Pueblo Pottery: “Pueblo pottery is made using a coiled technique that came into northern Arizona and New Mexico from the south, some 1500 years ago. In the four-corners region of the US, nineteen pueblos and villages have historically produced pottery. Although each of these pueblos use similar traditional methods of coiling, shaping, finishing and firing, the pottery from each is distinctive. Various clay's gathered from each pueblo’s local sources produce pottery colors that range from buff to earthy yellows, oranges, and reds, as well as black. Fired pots are sometimes left plain and other times decorated—most frequently with paint and occasionally with appliqué. Painted designs vary from pueblo to pueblo, yet share an ancient iconography based on abstract representations of clouds, rain, feathers, birds, plants, animals and other natural world features. Tempering materials and paints, also from natural sources, contribute further to the distinctiveness of each pueblo’s pottery. Some paints are derived from plants, others from minerals. Before firing, potters in some pueblos apply a light colored slip to their pottery, which creates a bright background for painted designs or simply a lighter color plain ware vessel. Designs are painted on before firing, traditionally with a brush fashioned from yucca fiber. Different combinations of paint color, clay color, and slips are characteristic of different pueblos. Among them are black on cream, black on buff, black on red, dark brown and dark red on white (as found in Zuni pottery), matte red on red, and polychrome—a number of natural colors on one vessel (most typically associated with Hopi). Pueblo potters also produce undecorated polished black ware, black on black ware, and carved red and carved black wares. Making pueblo pottery is a time-consuming effort that includes gathering and preparing the clay, building and shaping the coiled pot, gathering plants to make the colored dyes, constructing yucca brushes, and, often, making a clay slip. While some Pueblo artists fire in kilns, most still fire in the traditional way in an outside fire pit, covering their vessels with large potsherds and dried sheep dung. Pottery is left to bake for many hours, producing a high-fired result. Today, Pueblo potters continue to honor this centuries-old tradition of hand-coiled pottery production, yet value the need for contemporary artistic expression as well. They continue to improve their style, methods and designs, often combining traditional and contemporary techniques to create striking new works of art.” (Source: Museum of Northern Arizona) View the other items in my shop: http://www.etsy.com/shop/CulturalPatina?ref=shopsection_shophome_leftnav, Native American, Historic Acoma Pottery Jar, 144. Description: Native American, Historic Acoma Pottery Jar, Exquisite, large vintage pottery jar done in poly chrome with parrot figures, floral's, and more traditional geometric designs. Very good well-used condition. Large beautiful piece! Dimensions: 9-1/2" x 9-1/2" Date: Ca. 1940's. A History of Pueblo Pottery: “Pueblo pottery is made using a coiled technique that came into northern Arizona and New Mexico from the south, some 1500 years ago. In the four-corners region of the US, nineteen pueblos and villages have historically produced pottery. Although each of these pueblos use similar traditional methods of coiling, shaping, finishing and firing, the pottery from each is distinctive. Various clay's gathered from each pueblo’s local sources produce pottery colors that range from buff to earthy yellows, oranges, and reds, as well as black. Fired pots are sometimes left plain and other times decorated—most frequently with paint and occasionally with appliqué. Painted designs vary from pueblo to pueblo, yet share an ancient iconography based on abstract representations of clouds, rain, feathers, birds, plants, animals and other natural world features. Tempering materials and paints, also from natural sources, contribute further to the distinctiveness of each pueblo’s pottery. Some paints are derived from plants, others from minerals. Before firing, potters in some pueblos apply a light colored slip to their pottery, which creates a bright background for painted designs or simply a lighter color plain ware vessel. Designs are painted on before firing, traditionally with a brush fashioned from yucca fiber. Different combinations of paint color, clay color, and slips are characteristic of different pueblos. Among them are black on cream, black on buff, black on red, dark brown and dark red on white (as found in Zuni pottery), matte red on red, and polychrome—a number of natural colors on one vessel (most typically associated with Hopi). Pueblo potters also produce undecorated polished black ware, black on black ware, and carved red and carved black wares. Making pueblo pottery is a time-consuming effort that includes gathering and preparing the clay, building and shaping the coiled pot, gathering plants to make the colored dyes, constructing yucca brushes, and, often, making a clay slip. While some Pueblo artists fire in kilns, most still fire in the traditional way in an outside fire pit, covering their vessels with large potsherds and dried sheep dung. Pottery is left to bake for many hours, producing a high-fired result. Today, Pueblo potters continue to honor this centuries-old tradition of hand-coiled pottery production, yet value the need for contemporary artistic expression as well. They continue to improve their style, methods and designs, often combining traditional and contemporary techniques to create striking new works of art.” (Source: Museum of Northern Arizona) View the other items in my shop: http://www.etsy.com/shop/CulturalPatina?ref=shopsection_shophome_leftnavEn savoir plus

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Large Navajo Rug
Navajo Yei Weaving. 7'5" x 6'1" pictorial weaving with four Yei figures and two corn stalks within a latch hook border. Circa 1950s. Excellent Condition. The photo is only of 1/4 of the rug given it's size. Cultural Patina
Vintage Pottery : Vintage Native American Acoma Polychrome Pottery Jar
Ca. 1940s, Vintage polychrome pottery olla with striking geometric motif. Good overall condition and nice patina for its age, has some minor dings and pits. 7-1/4" x 8-1/2"  Cultural Patina
Native American, Burel Naha (b. 1944) Exquisite Pottery Seed Jar
Native American, Burel Naha (b. 1944) Exquisite Pottery Seed Jar Cultural Patina
Vintage Hopi Pottery by Marlena
Vintage Hopi Pottery by Marlena Cultural Patina
Native American Vintage Maricopa Pottery Scorpion Vase, by Jaylee
Native American Vintage Maricopa Pottery Scorpion Vase, by Jaylee Miles, Ca, 1900's, #1245 Cultural Patina

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