Cherchez parmi plus de 100 millions d'objets dans notre base de données de prix réalisés

The naval gold medal awarded to captain philip bowes vere broke, h.m.s.
Vendu

À propos de l'objet

Small size, as awarded to Captains; the obverse, designed by Lewis Pingo, depicting Britannia standing in a galley, her right foot resting on a helmet, being crowned with a laurel wreath by Victory; the plain reverse engraved captain p.b.v.  broke / h.m.s shannon 46 guns 330 men / captured 1 june 1813 in 15 minutes / u.s.s. chesapeak 49 guns 440 men   Virtually as issued, with original watch-type glasses of convex pattern, original suspension, ribbon and gold riband buckle\nPhilip Bowes Vere Broke was born at Broke Hall, on the banks of the River Orwell in Suffolk, in 1776.  From the age of twelve he studied at the Royal Academy, Portsmouth and his first ship, in 1792, was the sloop Bulldog.  The young midshipman transferred to a prize, H.M.S. L’Eclair, in August 1793, joined the Romulus in 1794 and was appointed Third Lieutenant to the frigate H.M.S. Southampton on 18th July 1795.\n\nOn the evening of 9th June 1796 Broke was present at a daring action which foreshadowed, in some respects, the Shannon’s encounter with the Chesapeake.  Lying off Toulon Admiral John Jervis chose the Southampton, under Captain James Macnamara, to make a bold attempt on the French corvette L’Utile: ‘Bring out the enemy’s ship, if you can; I give you no written order, but take care of the King’s ship under your command’.  The Southampton managed to make a close approach undetected, but her hailed challenge was answered with a broadside from L’Utile.  Lieutenant Charles Lydiard then led a boarding party which successfully took the enemy ship in ten minutes, although Lydiard had to locate and cut a hawser connected to the shore before the Southampton and her prize could escape.  Lashed together, under fire from the heavy battery at Fort Breganson, they rejoined the Fleet at about 1.30 am.  The action eventually qualified for its own clasp to the Naval General Service medal.\n\nBroke also served aboard Southampton at the Battle of Cape St. Vincent, returning to England in June 1797 when the ship was paid off.  In September 1798 he joined the 38-gun frigate Amelia, with instructions to search for a French squadron which had sailed from Brest bound for Ireland, in support of the rebellion.  The Amelia located the enemy on 11th October and Sir John Borlase Warren (later to become Commander-in-Chief on the American station) gave chase.  The action of the following day led to the capture of the 74-gun Hoche and two frigates.\n\nIn November 1802 Broke was married and spent a few happy years at home on half-pay.  After petitioning the Admiralty he obtained his own first command, the elderly and damp H.M.S. Druid, in April 1805.  From the unsatisfactory Druid he was appointed to a far more promising ship – the new 38-gun Shannon – which he joined in September 1806.\n\nThe Shannon was ordered north, to protect the whalers of Greenland and Spitzbergen from potential French attack, and attained the high latitude of 80º 30´.  On her return she took part in the expedition to capture Madeira before being employed on various European duties.  She docked at Plymouth on 1st June 1811 for re-coppering.\n\nIn September 1811 Broke was ordered to Halifax, Nova Scotia.  There was plenty of sea time for him to mould and train his crew and, particularly, to work on improving the efficiency of the ship’s gunnery.  Gunnery skills in the Royal Navy had declined, partly because large-scale battles called for little accuracy and partly owing to British adherence to ‘short’ rather than ‘long’ guns.  To make matters worse, the materials needed for practice purposes were severely rationed so training was minimal, and general maintenance was poor.  Broke fitted sights and elevation scales to his guns, instigated a regular and thorough training programme, and paid personally for extra powder and shot.  Before long he had succeeded in turning a motley crew into ‘the Shannons’, an efficient ship’s company which held him personally in the highest regard.\n\nThe outbreak of war with the U.S.A. in 1812 raised the stakes for the navies on both sides, and the Shannon was soon involved in numerous skirmishes.  The British blockade was extended to powerful effect but in battle the U.S. held the initiative, with conclusive victories in five single-ship actions in a little over six months.\n\nIn early April 1813, Broke in the Shannon and Hyde Parker in the Tenedos were watching Boston harbour, where they found the President and the Congress nearly ready for sea and the Constitution undergoing an extensive refit.  The weather was foggy and, to the chagrin of the British captains, the Chesapeake slipped into Boston undetected while the President and the Congress came out.  Towards the end of May the Chesapeake was clearly preparing to set sail again, but time was growing short for the British who would soon need to reprovision.  On 25th May Broke sent Parker to Cape Sable, reasoning that the Chesapeake was more likely to fight a single, evenly-matched, adversary.  On the morning of 1st June he issued a written challenge: ‘Sir, As the Chesapeake appears now ready for sea, I request you will do me the favour to meet the Shannon with her, ship to ship, to try the fortune of our respective flags…’.  As it so happened, Captain James Lawrence of the Chesapeake never received the message; Broke’s continued presence was challenge enough.  Firing a gun to signal his intentions, the confident Lawrence was on his way before the letter could be delivered.\n\nLawrence had only just assumed command of the Chesapeake, which he had joined from the Hornet following his recent and much-acclaimed victory over H.M.S. Peacock.   He chose to close the Shannon on her starboard quarter, giving three cheers when he came within fifty yards.  Broke’s well-trained gunners fired first, into the enemy’s ports.  The Chesapeake replied with a broadside, and casualties mounted on both sides as the action became general.  After about 10 minutes damage to both ships led to a collision in which the Chesapeake became entangled with the Shannon’s anchor fluke – and Broke made the instant, instinctive decision to board her, leading his men over the side with the cry: ‘Follow me who can!’.\n\nThere was a short but bloody battle, and 15 minutes after the first shots were fired the ‘Shannons’ won the day.  Great gallantry had been shown on all sides, but casualties were high among the officers and men of both ships.  Broke himself was severely wounded in the head and Watt, the Shannon’s First Lieutenant, was dead.  Captain Lawrence lay mortally wounded, having given his famous order: ‘Don’t Give Up the Ship!’.  \n\nLieutenants Provo Wallis (1791-1892, later to become Admiral of the Fleet) and Charles Falkiner took the Shannon and her prize to Halifax.  Captain Broke reassumed command for the voyage home, where he and his men were greeted as heroes.  He was made a Baronet on September 25th 1813 and a Knight Commander of the Order of the Bath on January 3rd 1815, in addition to receiving the small Naval Gold Medal, the City of London Sword and many further honours.\n\nSir Philip Bowes Vere Broke, K.C.B., Rear Admiral of the Red, died on 2nd January 1841.\n\nPROVENANCE\nBy direct descent
GB
GB
GB

*Merci de noter que le prix n'est pas recalculé à la valeur actuelle, mais se rapporte au prix final réel au moment où l'objet a été vendu.

*Merci de noter que le prix n'est pas recalculé à la valeur actuelle, mais se rapporte au prix final réel au moment où l'objet a été vendu.


Publicité
Publicité