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THE GLADSTONE DINNER-SERVICE A GEORGE IV SILVER DINNER-SERVICE
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À propos de l'objet

THE GLADSTONE DINNER-SERVICE\nA GEORGE IV SILVER DINNER-SERVICE\nMOST WITH MARK OF PAUL STORR, LONDON, 1824\na.) A Pair of Six-Light Candelabra\nEach on tricorn base with hairy lion's paw feet, engraved on one side with the Gladstone arms, on another with an inscription and on the third with the Liver bird, with six reeded branches and a central foliage cast finial, each marked on base, sockets, wan-pans, nozzles, finial and both tiers of branches, the bases further stamped 'Storr & Mortimer New Bond Street'\n27¼ in. (69.2 cm) high\n429 oz. 18 dwt. (13,370 gr.)\n\nb.)\nA Pair of Soup-Tureens and Covers\nEach bombé oval and on foliage capped paw feet, the detachable covers with foliage handles, with conforming plain liners, one side engraved with the Gladstone arms, the other with an inscription, the covers and liners engraved with the Gladstone crest, each marked under base, inside cover, on liner and handle\n15 3/8 in. (39 cm.) wide over handles\n343 oz. 18 dwt. (10,697 gr.)\n\nc.)\nA Set of Four Entrée-Dishes, Covers and Handles and Old Sheffield Plated Stands\nEach oblong with gadrooned borders, the domed covers with foliage handles, each engraved on the dish and cover with an inscription, further engraved on the cover with the Gladstone arms and on the dishes with the Gladstone crest, on conforming stands, each marked on dish, inside cover and on handle\nthe stands 14¼ in. (36 cm.) wide over handles\n\nd.)\nA Set Of Four Entreé-Dishes, Covers and Handles and Old Sheffield Plated Stands\nEach circular with gadrooned borders, the domed covers with foliage handles, each engraved on the dish and cover with an inscription, further engraved on the cover with the Gladstone arms and on the dishes with the Gladstone crest, on conforming stands, each marked on dish, inside cover and on handle\nthe stands 13½ in. (34 cm.) wide over handles\n232 oz. 18 dwt. (7,244 gr.)\n\ne.)\nA Set Of Four Wine-Coolers, Collars And Liners\nModelled on the Warwick-vase, each on square base and with fruiting grapevine cast borders, engraved on one side with the Gladstone arms and on the other with an inscription, the collars and liners each engraved with the Gladstone crest, each marked near handles, on liner and collar the bases further stamped 'Storr & Mortimer New Bond Street'\n9¾ in. (25 cm.) high\n13 in. wide over handles\n511 oz. 2 dwt. (16,209 gr.)\n\nf.)\nTwo sets of Four Salt-Cellars and spoons, one set 1829\nEach circular and on lion mask-capped paw feet, one set engraved with the Gladstone arms the other set engraved with the Gladstone crest, with eight King's Husk pattern salt-spoons, engraved with the Gladstone crest, by Mary Chawner, London, 1828-1837, marked under salts and on spoons\nThe salt-cellars 3½ in. (9 cm.) diam. and slightly smaller\n56 oz. 6 dwt. (1,753 gr.)\n\ng.)\nA Set Of Four Sauce-Tureens And Covers\nEach bombé circular and on four foliage-capped paw feet, with gadrooned rims, the detachable covers with foliage finials, each engraved with the Gladstone crest, the covers each engraved with Gladstone crest, each marked underneath, inside covers and on handles\n8¼ in. (21 cm.) wide over handles\n153 oz. 8 dwt. (4,772 gr.)\n\nh.)\nA Pair of Second-Course Dishes\nEach shaped circular with gadrooned rim, engraved with the Gladstone arms and an inscription, each marked under border\n17 in. (43 cm.) diam.\n132 oz. 16 dwt. (4,130 gr.)\n\ni.)\nA Graduated Set of Ten Meat-Dishes\nMark of John Houle, London, 1824\nEach shaped oval with gadrooned rim, engraved with the Gladstone arms and with an inscription, each marked under rim\none 23¼ in.(59.8 cm.) wide\none 22¼ in. (56.5 cm.) wide\ntwo 20 in.(51 cm.) wide\ntwo 18¼ in. (46.4 cm.) wide\ntwo 16¼ in. (41 cm.) wide\ntwo 15 in. (38 cm.) wide\n706 oz. 2 dwt. (21,963 gr.)\n\nj.)\nA Pair of Salvers\nEach shaped circular and on four foliage-capped feet, with gadrooned rim, engraved with the Gladstone arms and with an inscription\n23¾ in. (60.4 cm.) diam.\n329 oz. 14 dwt. (10,254 gr.)\n\nk.)\nA Seven-Piece Tea and Coffee-Service\nEach piece chased with foliage scrolls on a matted ground, engraved on one side with the Gladstone arms, the other with Gladstone crest, comprising: a coffee-pot, stand and lamp, a teapot; a jug, stand and lamp, each with ivory insulated handle; two sugar bowls and two cream jugs, one by John Samuel Hunt, London, 1862\nthe coffee-pot, stand and lamp 12½ in. (31.7 cm.) high\ngross weight 190 oz. 12 dwt.(5,928 gr.)\ngross weight 3,349 oz. 3 dwt. (104,078 gr.)\nThe arms are those of Gladstone impaling Robertson, for Sir John Gladstone (1764-1851) and his second wife Anne MacKenzie, the daughter of Andrew Robertson, who he married in 1800.\n\nThe inscription on the candelabra reads 'TO JOHN GLADSTONE ESQUIRE, M.P. THIS SERVICE OF PLATE WAS PRESENTED FEBRUARY MDCCCXXIV BY HIS FELLOW TOWNSMEN AND FRIENDS TO MARK THEIR HIGH SENSE OF HIS SUCCESSFUL EXERTIONS FOR THE PROMOTION OF TRADE AND COMMERCE AND IN ACKNOWLEDGMENT OF MOST IMPORTANT SERVICE RENDERED TO THE TOWN OF LIVERPOOL'\n\nThe inscription on the other pieces reads 'TO JOHN GLADSTONE ESQUIRE M.P. FROM HIS FELLOW TOWNSMEN AND FRIENDS LIVERPOOL 1824' (57)
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notes

This magnificent silver dinner service, commissioned by the people of Liverpool from Paul Storr, was presented to Sir John Gladstone (1764-1851) on Monday 18 October 1824, by the townspeople of Liverpool, to celebrate his role in the promotion of the trade and commerce of the city.

The son of a prosperous Leith merchant, John Gladstone bought corn from the Baltic for the Edinburgh market and went on to exploit the new Atlantic trade route. After having learned the business from his father, Gladstone moved to Liverpool in 1786, entering into a partnership with Edward Corries of Liverpool. The pair invested in American grain and tobacco, sending the first convoy of merchantmen to the United States after the War of Independence. In 1801, the two men parted ways and John set up business with his five brothers, investing in shipping insurance, ships, and Liverpool real estate. Advantageously positioned geographically, and making the most of new trade opportunities with America and France directly after their respective wars, Gladstone's business flourished.

A relative newcomer amongst the great seaports of Northern Europe, Liverpool expanded rapidly, growing with the profits made by pioneering businessmen such as Gladstone. The effect of his success was widely felt; by mechanizing the Liverpool Corn Exchange, Gladstone stabilized the grain provision for the whole of Lancashire, enabling and spurring on the early part of the Industrial Revolution. His legacy lives on today. Liverpool's two greatest docks, the Gladstone (Headquarters of the Royal Navy in the Battle of the Atlantic) and the Seaforth (which now handles more tonnage than all of the old docks combined) owe their names to him. By the time Sir John Gladstone retired, Liverpool was the second richest town in the world, with more millionaires than anywhere except London.

Gladstone also made Liverpool his home. His estate, Seaforth, was built on 100 acres of Litherland, four miles north-northwest of Liverpool. It was described by J. P. Neale in Views of the Seats of Noblemen and Gentlemen, 1824, as a house 'not large, but particularly commodious in the disposition of the apartments, with a pleasing exterior'. Although no contemporary descriptions of the interiors survive, Anne Gladstone, in a letter to her brother Tom in October 1817, reported that her father was spending so much time on altering the house that it should be now called 'Guttling Hall' - with alterations to the library and the picture gallery, as well as the construction of a further wing.

It is of little surprise then, in light of Gladstone's role in the city's growth, that the people of Liverpool subscribed and commissioned an ornate silver dinner service, mostly made by the leading silversmith of the period, Paul Storr (1771-1884). The Liverpool Mercury, of Friday 22 October 1824, records the event:

'The magnificent present to Mr. Gladstone, for which the inhabitants of Liverpool, some time ago, subscribed, was exposed last week, in Mr. Jones's shop, Castle-street. All the pieces, with the exception of the candelabra, have this inscription:

TO JOHN GLADSTONE, ESQ. M.P.

FROM

HIS FELLOW TOWNSMEN AND FRIENDS.

LIVERPOOL, 1824.

Mr. Gladstone's arms is also on all these. [...] On one side of the triangular base [of the candelabra] is Mr. Gladstone's arms, on the other the Liver, and on the third this inscription:-

TO

JOHN GLADSTONE, ESQ. M.P.

This Service of Plate was presented, Feb. MDCCCXXIV. by his Fellow-townsmen and Friends, to mark their high sense of his successful exertions, for the promotion of Trade and Commerce, and in acknowledgement of his most important Services, rendered to the Town of Liverpool.'

Neither is it surprising that Paul Storr was the silversmith chosen to produce this extraordinary service, which remains in its original pair of enormous steel-bound oak chests, also supplied by Storr & Mortimer. One of the most versatile and celebrated silversmiths of the early 19th century, Storr had been apprenticed to silversmith Andrew Fogelberg, before working for Royal goldsmiths Rundell and Bridge in 1807, finally setting up with John Mortimer in 1822, from which period this service dates.

The service has remained in the family, passed down from Sir John Gladstone to his eldest son, Sir Thomas, 2nd Bt. (1804-1889) and may have been kept, for some time at least, at Fasque, the family seat in Scotland, which Sir John had purchased from Sir Alexander Ramsey, Bt. in 1829 for £80,000. With Fasque secured, he leased Seaforth to the Paulet family in 1830 and brought a house-full of possessions from Liverpool, probably including this service, but purchased the majority of furnishings new during the 1830s. Gladstone went on to become an MP for Lancaster (1818-1820), Woodstock (1820-1826), and Berwick-upon-Tweed (1826-1827), the first of four generations of politicians. His fourth son, William Ewart Gladstone (1809-1898) went on to serve as Prime Minister on four separate occasions (1868-1874, 1880-1885, February-July 1886 and 1892-1894).

title

THE GLADSTONE DINNER-SERVICE A GEORGE IV SILVER DINNER-SERVICE

creator

Paul Storr

keywords

Paul Storr, early 19th Century, dinner services, All other categories of objects, decorative tableware & centre pieces, table services, silver, England, Georgian, Regency

department

EUROPEAN FURNITURE & WORKS OF ART

dimensions

27¼ in. (69.2 cm) high 429 oz. 18 dwt. (13,370 gr.) 15 3/8 in. (39 cm.) wide over handles 343 oz. 18 dwt. (10,697 gr.) the stands 14¼ in. (36 cm.) wide over handles the stands 13½ in. (34 cm.) wide over handles 232 oz. 18 dwt. (7,244 gr.) 9¾ in. (25 cm.) high 13 in. wide over handles 511 oz. 2 dwt. (16,209 gr.) The salt-cellars 3½ in. (9 cm.) diam. and slightly smaller 56 oz. 6 dwt. (1,753 gr.) 8¼ in. (21 cm.) wide over handles 153 oz. 8 dwt. (4,772 gr.) 17 in. (43 cm.) diam. 132 oz. 16 dwt. (4,130 gr.) one 23¼ in.(59.8 cm.) wide one 22¼ in. (56.5 cm.) wide two 20 in.(51 cm.) wide two 18¼ in. (46.4 cm.) wide two 16¼ in. (41 cm.) wide two 15 in. (38 cm.) wide 706 oz. 2 dwt. (21,963 gr.) 23¾ in. (60.4 cm.) diam. 329 oz. 14 dwt. (10,254 gr.) the coffee-pot, stand and lamp 12½ in. (31.7 cm.) high gross weight 190 oz. 12 dwt.(5,928 gr.) gross weight 3,349 oz. 3 dwt. (104,078 gr.)

literature

'Varieties', The Liverpool Mercury, 22 October 1824

provenance

Presented to Sir John Gladstone (1764-1851) on Monday, 18 October 1824, following a public subscription raised by the people of Liverpool, thence by descent.

special_notice

Prospective purchasers are advised that several countries prohibit the importation of property containing materials from endangered species, including but not limited to coral, ivory and tortoiseshell. Accordingly, prospective purchasers should familiarize themselves with relevant customs regulations prior to bidding if they intend to import this lot into another country.


*Merci de noter que le prix n'est pas recalculé à la valeur actuelle, mais se rapporte au prix final réel au moment où l'objet a été vendu.

*Merci de noter que le prix n'est pas recalculé à la valeur actuelle, mais se rapporte au prix final réel au moment où l'objet a été vendu.

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