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Significant 1932 US Caramel #32 Babe Ruth PSA 8 NM-MT Among the...
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The 1920s were a colorful time in baseball. In 1919, Babe Ruth put The Dead Ball Era to bed when he smashed 29 home runs, more than the season totals of ten other big league teams, including both pennant winners. Until then, the National Pastime had been dominated by the base-to-base strategies of Ty Cobb, with games averaging just 3.4 runs per outing. Ruth's unprecedented 29 in 1919 both awakened the game and helped it survive the Black Sox scandal of that year, but when he clobbered 54 in 1920, now in New York pinstripes, the game truly entered a new era. While the nation roared its way to prosperity throughout the 20s, Ruth continued his incomparable play, with size and swagger in everything he did, making him one of the most famous people in the world. Unfortunately for later generations, much of the old cardboard produced during this lively era was largely black and white, a far cry from the colorful candy and tobacco cards of the teens that had scorched images of players like Cobb, Wagner, Johnson and Young onto the nation's collective brain, even to this day. In the '20s, however, many American printing and publishing firms had not yet fully recovered from the paper shortages of World War I, and so, despite the zeitgeist of the roaring 20s and the birth of baseball's live ball era, most of the decade's baseball cards were crude black and white photos that completely failed to grasp the nation's kaleidoscopic excitement.\n\nColor, cardboard, and baseball would not reunite on a national level, in fact, until well into the Great Depression, with brilliantly mesmerizing gum sets like Goudey, DeLong, and Diamond Stars helping to lift the spirits of the nation's downtrodden, even if only for the duration of a good chew. Before these famous gum sets, however, one of the very first national baseball card issues to re-infuse the nation's imagination with a healthy dose of color was the 1932 US Caramel set. A bridge between the caramel candy sets of the teens and 20s and the gum sets of the 30s, the '32 US Caramel set included not only baseball players, but a pair of famous golfers and three boxers as well, and the company also issued a run of popular Presidents cards with a similar design. The cards featured colorized black and white busts against vibrant, candy-colored, orange-red backdrops and included names like Ty Cobb, Lou Gehrig, Rogers Hornsby, Jimmy Foxx, Bobby Jones and Gene Sarazen, Jack Dempsey and Jack Sharkey. Apart from the elusive #16 Charles Lindstrom card that was intentionally super-short-printed so that most customers could not complete their sets for redemption prizes, the set's key card was of course #32 Babe Ruth, one of the most memorable Babe Ruth baseball cards ever produced, on which the Home Run King appears like a laid-back monarch, with the crown of his New York Yankees cap sitting slightly and characteristically askew, like a 1930s wise guy or, later, a famous 1990s rapper.\n\nNot only are the 1932 US Caramels significant for reintroducing color to baseball cards and for bridging the gap between caramel cards of the teens and gum cards of the thirties, but the cards are also extremely scarce, particularly in high-grade. The offered PSA 8 NM-MT Ruth, for example, is one of just 121 total copies ever graded by PSA, and it reports just a dozen others in its advanced class with just two higher, while no other card in the entire set reports a higher total population than Lou Gehrig at 78. Comparing these numbers to the population statistics for Ruth's famous four cards from the '33 Goudey issue makes it easy to understand why this masterpiece US Caramel stands in a class all its own. For starters, the popular #144 "Full Body" pose from the '33 Goudey set reports 31 examples in the NM-MT 8 class on record at PSA with 5 graded higher, with recent prices for PSA 8s averaging about $25,000 over the last two years. The green back 1933 Goudey Ruth (card #181) reports a similar breakdown, with 32 copies on record in the NM-MT 8 grade and 7 higher, with PSA 8s averaging about $23,000 over the last few years. The red back Goudey Ruth (card #149) is slightly tougher, with 19 copies on record in the NM-MT 8 grade at PSA, the last two of which have fetched $36,400 and $35,500. Last but not least, the infamous yellow back (card #53), the toughest of the 1933 Goudey Babe Ruth cards, is a little more comparable to the 1932 US Caramel, with just 16 examples graded PSA 8 NM-MT, with sales averaging well above $50,000 over the last few years. The Goudey Ruth cards are some of the most iconic baseball cards ever produced, but they're not exactly rare. The combined population for the above four Goudey Ruths on record at PSA is a whopping 3,341, whereas the 1932 US Caramel Ruth reports just 121, and its scant 13 PSA 8 NM-MTs are statistically more comparable to the highest dozen or so graded Babe Ruth rookie cards from 1916 than to any other mainstream Ruth issue ever produced. In short, with key cards like the Goudey Ruths from PSA's Top 200 Sports Cards list breaking sales records almost every month, this iconic, age-defining, and historically significant masterpiece, also a Top 200 Sports Card, is likely to turn a few heads as well, especially since a PSA 8 NM-MT copy has only publicly traded hands just a single time over the course of the last decade.
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*Merci de noter que le prix n'est pas recalculé à la valeur actuelle, mais se rapporte au prix final réel au moment où l'objet a été vendu.

*Merci de noter que le prix n'est pas recalculé à la valeur actuelle, mais se rapporte au prix final réel au moment où l'objet a été vendu.


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