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Casey Stengel’s 1951 New York Yankees World Series Ring
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À propos de l'objet

Casey Stengel's 1951 New York Yankees World Series Ring, Nineteen fifty-one will forever stand as a definitive year in the history of the New York Yankees franchise. Not only does it represent the hub of the Yankees record run of five consecutive titles, but it also signifies the lone convergence of three of the team's most iconic figures. Casey Stengel, whose tenure with the Yankees would prove to be the most successful in team history, had managed DiMaggio for two seasons since Casey took the helm after the departure of Bucky Harris in 1948. They had won the World Series twice together in two tries. However, by 1951, the great DiMaggio's career was winding down. It has often been reported that he wanted to retire before he became an "ordinary" player. His retirement was also hastened by bone spurs in his heel. The 1951 season would be the curtain call of the "Yankee Clipper". However, it also marked the arrival of the "Oklahoma Kid", Mickey Mantle, who bore the weight of unbridled expectations to fill the gap in centerfield. Word had spread that this young phenom’s monumental power and blazing speed might actually make him a viable replacement to the irreplaceable Joe DiMaggio as the "new" Yankee idol. So convinced of this were the Yankees that they assigned their young prodigy uniform number "6," the next in a sequence that included Ruth (#3), Gehrig (#4), and Joltin' Joe (#5). Though some referred to 1951 as a season of change for the Yankees, the end result was more of the same, another championship title. The Yankees dispatched their cross-town rival New York Giants in 6 games, ending their Cinderella season ("The Giants Win The Pennant!"). It was a sweet ending for some and a new beginning for others; Game 6 marked the final Major League game for DiMaggio, who was headed for retirement at age thirty-six, while Mantle would appear in eleven more World Series. The Yankees were now 14-4 in World Series appearances and 1951 marked the solidification of the second coming of a baseball dynasty. This is Casey's own 14k gold 1951 Yankees Championship ring, remaining in virtually the same condition as when he received it. A shimmering .30-carat diamond rests in the center of the ring's face. The manufacturer's stamping "Dieges & Clust" and his name "Charles D. Stengel" appear inside the size 10 band. Classic design elements include the proclamation "New York Yankees World Champions" encompassing the face, and the year "1951" on both sides above the Yankees top hat logo. Casey's ultimate prize ranks among the most important World Series rings ever offered for sale publicly. LOA from the Stengel family.
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Nineteen fifty-one will forever stand as a definitive year in the history of the New York Yankees franchise. Not only does it represent the hub of the Yankees record run of five consecutive titles, but it also signifies the lone convergence of three of the team's most iconic figures. Casey Stengel, whose tenure with the Yankees would prove to be the most successful in team history, had managed DiMaggio for two seasons since Casey took the helm after the departure of Bucky Harris in 1948. They had won the World Series twice together in two tries. However, by 1951, the great DiMaggio's career was winding down. It has often been reported that he wanted to retire before he became an "ordinary" player. His retirement was also hastened by bone spurs in his heel. The 1951 season would be the curtain call of the "Yankee Clipper". However, it also marked the arrival of the "Oklahoma Kid", Mickey Mantle, who bore the weight of unbridled expectations to fill the gap in centerfield. Word had spread that this young phenom’s monumental power and blazing speed might actually make him a viable replacement to the irreplaceable Joe DiMaggio as the "new" Yankee idol. So convinced of this were the Yankees that they assigned their young prodigy uniform number "6," the next in a sequence that included Ruth (#3), Gehrig (#4), and Joltin' Joe (#5). Though some referred to 1951 as a season of change for the Yankees, the end result was more of the same, another championship title. The Yankees dispatched their cross-town rival New York Giants in 6 games, ending their Cinderella season ("The Giants Win The Pennant!"). It was a sweet ending for some and a new beginning for others; Game 6 marked the final Major League game for DiMaggio, who was headed for retirement at age thirty-six, while Mantle would appear in eleven more World Series. The Yankees were now 14-4 in World Series appearances and 1951 marked the solidification of the second coming of a baseball dynasty. This is Casey's own 14k gold 1951 Yankees Championship ring, remaining in virtually the same condition as when he received it. A shimmering .30-carat diamond rests in the center of the ring's face. The manufacturer's stamping "Dieges & Clust" and his name "Charles D. Stengel" appear inside the size 10 band. Classic design elements include the proclamation "New York Yankees World Champions" encompassing the face, and the year "1951" on both sides above the Yankees top hat logo. Casey's ultimate prize ranks among the most important World Series rings ever offered for sale publicly. LOA from the Stengel family.


*Merci de noter que le prix n'est pas recalculé à la valeur actuelle, mais se rapporte au prix final réel au moment où l'objet a été vendu.

*Merci de noter que le prix n'est pas recalculé à la valeur actuelle, mais se rapporte au prix final réel au moment où l'objet a été vendu.


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