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A pair of louis xv terrestrial and celestial library globes on green-painted
Vendu

À propos de l'objet

Each globe encircled by a graduated brass meridian, the curved stands raised on scrolled cabriole legs joined by a stretcher, ending in scrolled toes; the terrestrial globe inscribed: GLOBE TERRESTRE dressé par order du Roi Par le Sr. Robert de Vaugondy, 1751. Nouvelle édition corrigé et augmentée par l'Auteur Géographe ord. du Roi de S.M. Polonois Duc de Lorraine et de Bar, et de la Société royale des sciences et Belles-Lettres de Nancy 1773 Avec Privilege; and a further inscription: A PARIS Chés l'AUTEUR Quay de l'horloge du Palais, Arrivet inv. & Sculp.; the celestial globe with an inscription: GLOBE CELESTE dressé par order DU ROI et calculé pour l'année 1770 par le Sr ROBERT DE VAUGONDY, fils Avec approbation de l'Académie Royale des Sciences Aout 1751.\nDidier, Robert de Vaugondy (1723-1786) Géographe ordinaire du roi\nAnother pair of globes by de Vaugondy on identical stands was in the collection of Henri Rabeau, sold, Sotheby's, Monaco, June 17, 1989, lot 817 and later from the collection of Karl Lagerfeld, sold, Christie's, Monaco, April 29-30, 2000, lot 75.\nDidier de Vaugondy, (1723-1786) became the leading publisher of French globes in the second half of the 18th century. He was the son of Gilles Robert de Vaugondy, (1688-1766), the author of the Atlas portatif Universel et Militaire, and the great-grandson of one of the greatest 17th century French cartographers, Nicolas Sanson, official geographer to the royal household.\nDidier and his brother Martin worked with their father in their workshop on the quai de l’Horloge near the Louvre, publishing maps and atlases as well as re-editions of their great-grandfather Sanson’s publications. They were in close proximity to fellow mathematicians and makers of scientific instruments. Among them Nicolas Bion and his son Jean Pigeon, Pierre Moullart-Sanson, Nicolas Fortin, and Jean-Baptiste Fortin.\nBy the time he was twenty Didier de Vaugondy published a series of globes accompanied by a book Abrégé des différents systemes du monde de la sphère et usages des globes, suivants les hypothèses de Ptolémé et Copernic in 1745. This work demonstrated not only his affinity for and abilities in cartography, but also his innovation in the mounting and presentation of globes and armillary spheres.\nIn 1750 Didier presented a terrestrial globe measuring 6 pouces (16 cm) to Louis XV in a competition for the position of Géographe ordinaire du roi, which he eventually obtained. Upon the invitation of Denis Diderot, Vaugondy wrote a seven page treatise in Diderot’s first edition of the Encyclopédie on the manufacture of globes describing each stage of the process, from the choice of wood to the glue used to attach the strips onto the globe.\nHe received a royal commission for a pair of globes 18 pouces (46 cm) in diameter for the use of the Navy. These were the largest globes produced since those by Vicenzo Coronelli between 1688 and 1693, measuring trois pieds et demi (114 cm) in diameter. These were thought to have been presented in November or December of 1751 along with a special edition of Usage des Globes. The pair was accepted by the Royal Academy of Sciences, chaired by the astronomers Cassini and Le Monnier.\nFrom 1784 until his death in 1786, Didier worked along with Nicolas Gabriel le Clerc and Dom Claude Bergevin on the project for a globe of 8 pieds (260 cm) diameter, preserved at Versailles, but he did not live to see it completed.\nThe present globes were part of a group initially offered by Vaugondy in 1751 as a subscription; he successfully reissued them in 1764 and in 1773. Subscribers to the globes were also offered a copy of his Usage des Globes, his catalogue cites the following prices:\n"Montage simple" 460 livres\n"Montage sur un pied mais de bon gout, vernis a la capucin" 600 livres\n"Sur un pied plus élaboré et montage de bronze" 800 livres.\nThere are very few extant examples of these globes. Mary Spondberg Pedley cites one on a later base in the office of the Directeur des Archives et Documentation au Ministère des Affaires Etrangères de Paris based on Diderot’s Encyclopédie publication. Edward-Luther Stevenson, in 1921, could not locate any of the globes from 1751, however he does cite the re-editions of 1764 in the Biblioteca Governativa de Lucca, in the Biblioteca Real de Caserta and at the Osservatorio Patriarcale of Venice where he lists only one celestial globe.
US
NY, US
US

dimensions

Height 45 1/2 in.; diameter (globe) 18 in.; width 27 in.

provenance

J. Kugel, Paris

signedDate

Didier, Robert de Vaugondy (1723-1786) Géographe ordinaire du roi


*Merci de noter que le prix n'est pas recalculé à la valeur actuelle, mais se rapporte au prix final réel au moment où l'objet a été vendu.

*Merci de noter que le prix n'est pas recalculé à la valeur actuelle, mais se rapporte au prix final réel au moment où l'objet a été vendu.


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