Toutes les enchères en un seul endroit

  • Montres & Horlogerie

    25 850 En vente

    1 789 821 Vendu

  • 0—384 000 000 EUR
  • 19 mars 1988— 7 août 2018

Filtres

Réinitialiser
- EUR

La Dormeuse

Pablo Picasso oil and charcoal on canvas Executed on 13 March 1932, this work is accompanied by a photo-certificate of authenticity signed by Claude Picasso. Pablo Picasso painted La Dormeuse on 13 March 1932, during one of the most incredibly fertile periods of creativity of his entire career. This was one of a string of paintings depicting his lover, Marie-Thérèse Walter, many of which are now in museum collections. These are among the most revered of all Picasso’s paintings, and indeed have recently become the subject of a dedicated exhibition entitled Picasso 1932 which opened in October 2017 at the Musée national Picasso, Paris and which will subsequently travel to Tate Modern, London. The pictures Picasso created that year, and in particular in the first weeks of March, were unfettered celebrations of his life with Marie-Thérèse.This is clear to see in La Dormeuse, in which the sweeping curves and undulations that comprise her body denote an experiential, almost proprietorial motion on the part of the artist himself, as Picasso moved back and forth before the canvas, creating lyrical lines and conjuring Marie-Thérèse’s voluptuous forms through layers of arabesques. La Dormeuse is both a drawing and a painting, with its cerulean patch of blue, and for this reason benefits from an added sense of spontaneity and intimacy compared to some of the finished oils from the period. Indeed, the pentimenti which are visible underneath reveal other configurations that Marie-Thérèse’s features had taken during the creation of the picture, add a sense of movement and time to La Dormeuse. It is a palimpsest, with layers of recorded appearances. La Dormeuse remained in Picasso’s own possession until his death, and was then inherited by his widow Jacqueline Roque, before passing to her daughter from a previous marriage, Catherine Hutin-Blay. Picasso would later say of the pictures that he accumulated, reflecting his unwillingness to part with many of them, 'I am the greatest collector of Picassos in the world' (Pablo Picasso, quoted in Roberto Otero, Forever Picasso: An Intimate Look at His Last Years, trans. Elaine Kerrigan, New York, 1974, p. 26).Picasso had met Marie-Thérèse just over five years before he painted La Dormeuse, on 8 January 1927, approaching her at the Galeries Lafayette where she was shopping. Marie-Thérèse was in her late teens, decades younger than Picasso, yet her striking appearance—with her blonde hair and curvy figure—formed a contrast with his Russian ballerina wife, Olga Khokhlova. ‘I was an innocent gamine. I knew nothing - life, Picasso, nothing,’ Marie-Thérèse would later recall. ‘He simply grabbed me by the arm and said, "I'm Picasso! You and I are going to do great things together"’ (Marie-Thérèse Walter, quoted in Barry Farrell, 'Picasso: His Women: The Wonder Is that He Found So Much Time to Paint', Life, 27 December 1968, p. 74). Marie-Thérèse resembled some of the figures who had recently been appearing in Picasso’s pictures, and he would later tell their daughter: 'The day I met Marie-Thérèse I realised that I had before me what I had always been dreaming about' (Pablo Picasso, quoted in Diana Widmaier-Picasso, 'The Encounter Between Picasso and Marie-Thérèse Walter (1927): Thoughts on a Historiographical Revision', pp. 162-69, Ingrid Mössinger, Beate Ritter & Kerstin Drechsel (ed.), Picasso et les femmes, exh. cat., Chemnitz, 2002, p. 169). This was a perfect, Surreal coup de foudre, and the pair soon embarked on a passionate affair.During the first years of their relationship, Marie-Thérèse tended to appear in codified form in Picasso’s works. The artist even created devices within still life compositions that included her initials, teasingly concealing her presence in plain sight. However, in the early 1930s, he began to explore her appearance more directly. This was particularly evident in the sculptures that he created in his studio in the stable block at his château, Boisgeloup, in 1931. These combined a stylised mass with Marie-Thérèse’s distinctive features, and the same profile is visible in La Dormeuse and many of the other pictures of the following year. It appears to have been at the beginning of 1932 that some form of Rubicon was crossed with Olga, which resulted in Picasso no longer hiding Marie-Thérèse in his pictures, although he still went to great pains to keep her existence secret, even from many of his close friends. Charles Stuckey has suggested that the commitment to women’s rights, and by extension, shown by the Republicans in Picasso’s native Spain may have influenced this—especially after the passing of their Divorce Law in March of that year. Certainly, it is true that the creative dam suddenly broke, with Picasso embarking upon one of the most legendary streaks of creativity of his entire career, as he spent time with his Muse, recording her features in fluid, lyrical pictures day after day, creating an almost cinematic sequence of images. La Dormeuse dates from the apogee of this surge. With Marie-Thérèse’s face shaped like a painter’s palette, this is a paean to creative freedom as well as to love.A number of the pictures that Picasso created of Marie-Thérèse show her asleep. A witness of the period, who had known her, was recorded by the artist’s biographer John Richardson saying, 'Never forget that Marie-Thérèse was the quintessence of dolce fa niente... and if Picasso usually portrayed her dozing or sunbathing or playing games, it was because these activities and passivities were the be-all and end-all of her easy-going nature' (quoted in John Richardson, 'Picasso and Marie-Thérèse Walter', in Through the Eye of Picasso 1928-1934, exh. cat., New York, 1985, n.p.). While in some of his pictures, Picasso deliberately focussed his composition on Marie-Thérèse’s face alone, in others he celebrated her entire body, as is the case in La Dormeuse. Three years after this picture was painted, Picasso would write a poem which included the line, ‘combien je l’aime maintenant qu’elle dort’ (Pablo Picasso poem from 1935, quoted in Robert Rosenblum, ‘Picasso’s Blond Muse: The Reign of Marie-Thérèse Walter’, Picasso and Portraiture: Representation and Transformation, London, 1996, p. 348). It is that sentiment that is captured so intoxicatingly in the vigorous lines of La Dormeuse.Dated '13 March 1932' La Dormeuse is part of a string of pictures often considered to have been painted at Boisgeloup, shortly after Picasso had returned there after a stint at his Paris home, 23 rue La Boétie. Recent scholarship has suggested that he had in fact remained in the French capital for a longer period and created the pictures in his studio on the floor above his apartment there (Laurence Madeline, Picasso 1932, exh. cat., Paris, 2017, p. 56). Certainly Picasso had been in Paris a few days earlier, when he painted his Nature morte aux tulipes, which featured a bust of Marie-Thérèse, recalling both his lover and the sculptures of her that he had made the previous year. Shortly afterwards, Marie-Thérèse was depicted sprawled naked underneath a similar bust and a plant in Femme nue, feuilles et buste, now on long-term loan to Tate Modern, London, and formerly in the Frances Lasker Brody collection, which achieved a world auction record when offered at auction in 2010. This was the picture that Picasso hung in his own apartment in Paris, as recorded in a photographic portrait taken by Cecil Beaton the following year. That work was signed on 8 March; on the 9th, he painted the related Nu au fauteuil noir in the Abigail and Leslie Wexner collection. Where Marie-Thérèse’s presence was codified through the use of the bust motif and other devices in his earlier still life composition, these two pictures featured the naked horizontal body itself, depicted using similar looping lines to those in La Dormeuse. Here is what the art critic Leo Steinberg called ‘Drawing as if to possess’, referring to a comment that Picasso himself had made in conversation with the museum director William Rubin: ‘que je les possède’ (Leo Steinberg, quoted in, ‘The Algerian Women and Picasso at Large’, in Leo Steinberg, Other Criteria: Confrontations with Twentieth-Century Art, Oxford, 1972, pp. 174 and 411). In all of these paintings, these contours double as proprietorial caresses as Picasso delineated his lover’s body, observing, exploring and eulogising its forms. On the 12 March, the day before completing La Dormeuse, Picasso painted Le miroir, in which introduced the titular mirror to his depictions of his lover, allowing him to make a playful riff on the Cubist technique of depicting objects in the round—in this work, the reflection gives the artist a pretext for showing both Marie-Thérèse’s breasts and her buttocks. In La Dormeuse, Picasso has pushed past that motif, and past the limitations of objective representation, instead exploring the entirety of Marie-Thérèse’s voluptuous figure through a flow of lines that delineate her body as a composite, seen from various angles, with her breasts, her vagina and her rear all synchronously visible. This playfully combines references to the Cubistic way of seeing the world with a poetic chronicling of Marie-Thérèse stirring and shifting in her sleep, and ultimately rolling over. Crucially, in La Dormeuse, Picasso chose a landscape format: rather than allowing Marie-Thérèse’s body to occupy the lower portion of a painting, or to be presented upright, here he has adjusted the composition in order to allow himself to focus entirely on her. He fills the canvas with her forms, leaving room for no distracting or extraneous details. Every line is devoted to Marie-Thérèse.The following day, 14 March, Picasso painted what has become the most iconic of this series of paintings, Jeune fille devant un miroir, which is one of the emblematic works from the Museum of Modern Art, New York, which it entered as early as 1938—only six years after its execution. In that highly-finished work, Picasso returned to the use of the mirror as a device to portray Marie-Thérèse from a number of angles. There are crucial differences between this picture and its predecessors, though—after all, Marie-Thérèse is here presented upright and awake. In addition, the sense of fluidity that characterises this picture’s predecessors, including La Dormeuse, is countered by the various hatchings and other patterns that populate this canvas. Picasso has replicated the wallpaper of his Paris apartment, as he had in Le miroir two days earlier, leading to the conclusion that the work may have been created there, although Richardson has pointed out that he need not have necessarily been before the motif (Laurence Madeline, Picasso 1932, exh. cat., Paris, 2017, p. 31 and John Richardson, quoted in, A Life of Picasso: The Triumphant Years 1917-1932, London, 2007, p. 468). In some ways, Jeune fille devant un miroir and La Dormeuse can be seen as polar opposites, the former picture crammed with detail while the latter breathes with its focus on the forms of Marie-Thérèse’s body. In it, Picasso has left much of the surface in reserve, granting it an incredible luminescence, while also highlighting the dizzying, dynamic haze of underdrawings. Intriguingly, while Jeune fille devant un miroir is often considered the culmination of this series of paintings, Richardson has pointed out that Picasso himself had said: ‘The penultimate one is almost always the strongest’ (John Richardson, A Life of Picasso: The Triumphant Years 1917-1932, London, 2007, p. 470).It has been suggested by numerous authors, even within Picasso’s own lifetime, that his artistic style changed in accordance to the woman dominant in his life. Certainly this was the case with the period in which Marie-Thérèse was in the ascendant—but the poetic, celebratory, sensual works of March 1932 such as La Dormeuse came only after a period of tumult which had a style of its own. When compared with the gigantism and classicism of Picasso’s paintings during the earlier years of his marriage to Olga, the stylised swoops of Picasso’s lines in La Dormeuse appear very different indeed. There is none of the cool detachment that had marked those earlier pictures: instead, Picasso appears to have flung himself into his subject matter. The curves that form Marie-Thérèse’s body, which stretch to almost life size across the expanse of the canvas, hint at the artist’s own exploratory movements, his energy and enthusiasm as he created this image. This physical dimension to the creation of La Dormeuse may have been all the more relevant to Picasso, as only the previous year he had turned fifty years of age. Now, through his relationship with a girl in her early twenties, he appeared reinvigorated. Before the blooming of the sinuous depictions of Marie-Thérèse’s body seen in pictures such as La Dormeuse and Le miroir, Picasso had gone through a troubled period in which he appears to have been wracked by anxiety about his dual life—bourgeois husband and father on the one hand, and bohemian painter-lover on the other. These expressed themselves in a number of pictures that were infused with the Surrealism espoused by a number of his friends and contemporaries. In those works, body parts penetrated each other, speaking of tension rather than joy, as in Figures au bord de la mer of January 1931 (Musée Picasso, Paris). A year later, some of this tension remained, as is perceptible in some of the depictions of Marie-Thérèse, such as the Grunewald-inspired Femme au fauteuil rouge in the same museum, or in the depiction of Olga seemingly in a fit, the ironically-named Le repos in the collection of Steven and Alexandra Cohen. In that work, the dancer’s body was submitted to horrific transformations, her hair on end, her mouth wide in a silent scream that resonates through the hot red of the chair in which she sits. These tensions appear to have been exorcised within a very short space of time, as Le rêve, also in the Steven and Alexandra Cohen collection was painted only two days afterwards. Now, a new style was in the ascendant. Many of the depictions of Marie-Thérèse painted in the following years would retain a strong foothold in the colourism and cloisonnisme that had come to the fore in Le rêve, and which are evident even in the deliberately restrained palette of La Dormeuse. Both the colourism and the subject matter that Picasso was exploring in the string of depictions of Marie-Thérèse can be seen as a response to one of his great artistic contemporaries and rivals, Henri Matisse. Picasso and Matisse came to regard each other as friends as well as long-term rivals. 'As different as the North Pole is from the South Pole,' Matisse said of the pair of them, according to Fernande Olivier (Henri Matisse, quoted in Jack Flam, Matisse and Picasso: The Story of Their Rivalry and Friendship, Cambridge, MA, 2003). Picasso jealously admired the elegant simplicity of Matisse's line and colour, and this admiration percolates through La Dormeuse. It was only the previous year, in 1931, that Matisse had been given a retrospective at the Galerie Georges Petit in Paris. The show, largely organised by Matisse’s dealers, focussed on his recent Nice paintings and in particular his odalisques, rather than showing the arc of his artistic quests. Picasso’s attentive presence was noted at the time, as he investigated what Matisse had been doing. In some ways, La Dormeuse can be seen as a response. Picasso was creating his own odalisque. Looking at the composition of La Dormeuse, though, another influence may also be noted: Picasso’s artistic hero, Jean-Auguste-Dominique Ingres. Looking at Ingres’ Odalisque with Slave, Picasso can be seen to have taken a cue from its composition in the sprawling limbs and the curves of the body. In particular, the underdrawing of La Dormeuse, with the head shown facing upwards, looks like a mirrored reinterpretation of Ingres’ original. Picasso may have known Ingres’ drawing of the subject in the Cabinet des Dessins at the Louvre, Paris, but would also doubtless have seen Ingres’ original painting in the flesh (Fogg Museum, Harvard University). After all, the year before La Dormeuse was painted, it had been lent to a charity exhibition held in the gallery of Picasso’s dealer, Paul Rosenberg, at 21 Rue La Boétie—next door to Picasso’s home.Picasso’s own approval of La Dormeuse was confirmed by the fact that he also created a smaller drawing on canvas echoing its finished form, while reprising the layered arabesques created by the underdrawings in the larger work. However, it was the composition visible in the lighter pemtimenti in La Dormeuse, absent in that smaller example, that Picasso would explore in a number of variations upon the theme later in 1932, showing Marie-Thérèse with her palette-like head facing upwards. In all of those works, the tentacle-like way that Picasso depicted her limbs, adding to the sense of fluidity of her body so evident in La Dormeuse, was increasingly exaggerated. Indeed, the composition increasingly came to recall that of Hokusai’s famous print, The Dream of the Fisherman’s Wife, in which a woman is shown in a bizarre sexual encounter with two octopuses, one of them vast. Already in La Dormeuse, Picasso appears to have manipulated the bulk of Marie-Thérèse’s hips, shown from front and back, to echo the appearance of Hokusai’s octopus, with her breasts doubling as its eyes; this effect is heightened by the roving confusion of limbs. As demonstrated in the 2009 exhibition Secret Images: Picasso and the Japanese Erotic Print, held at the Museu Picasso, Barcelona, the artist himself kept a number of shunga images in his own collection. His knowledge of Hokusai’s famous, indeed infamous, print with the octopi appears to have been indicated by his own drawing of a woman being sexually pleasured by a cephalopod as early as 1903. In the catalogue for that exhibition, Ricard Bru forensically examined how copies of Hokusai’s print were owned by people in Picasso’s circle, and how many of them were influenced by it (R. Bru, ‘Tentacles of Love and Death: From Hokusai to Picasso’, pp. 50-65, Secret Images: Picasso and the Japanese Erotic Print, exh. cat., trans. L. Maguire, Barcelona, 2009). In La Dormeuse, then, Picasso has tapped into the wide realm of his visual erudition, fusing the visual languages of Ingres, Hokusai and Matisse with his encounters with Surrealism, channelling all these in order to create a unique, poetic and highly personalised record of his relationship with Marie-Thérèse.Curator and art historian Dr Charles Stuckey’s feature on La Dormeuse can be viewed at the following link: phillips.com/sleeping-nude

  • GBRGrande Bretagne
  • 2018-03-08
Prix ​​d'adjudication
Voir le prix

The Henry Graves Jr. Supercomplication PATEK PHILIPPE & Co., Geneva

A gold, double dialled and double open-faced, minute repeating clockwatch with Westminster chimes, grande and petite sonnerie, split seconds chronograph, registers for 60-minutes and 12-hours, perpetual calendar accurate to the year 2100, moon-phases, equation of time, dual power reserve for striking and going trains, mean and sidereal time, central alarm, indications for times of sunrise/sunset and a celestial chart for the night time sky of New York City at 40 degrees 41.0 minutes North latitude Accompanied by the original fitted tulipwood box inlaid with ebony and centered by a mother-of-pearl panel engraved with the arms of Henry Graves, Jr. Also accompanied by the Patek Philippe Certificate of Origin and an Extract from the Archives of Patek Philippe. In the course of Patek Philippe’s 175 years as a master watchmaker, an anniversary which the firm celebrates this yea, many extraordinary watches have been created that have challenged the way we think about timepieces. It is an honour to offer the Henry Graves Jr. Supercomplication in this important anniversary year of Patek Philippe, Geneva. Amongst the most complicated and significant timepieces ever created, the Henry Graves Jr. Supercomplication redefined the possibilities of watchmaking and changed horology forever. With 24 complications, it remained the world's most complicated watch until Patek Philippe created the Calibre 89 in 1989 for its 150th anniversary. However, the Henry Graves Jr. Supercomplication retains the title of the most complicated watch ever made without computer-assisted technology. We are grateful to Eric Tortella for his assistance in researching the Henry Graves Jr. Supercomplication. LOT 345 PATEK PHILIPPE THE HENRY GRAVES JR. SUPERCOMPLICAITON PATEK PHILIPPE & Co., Geneva, No. 198.385, Case No. 416.769, started in 1925, completed in 1932 and delivered on 19th January 1933 diameter 74mm; thickness of case with glass 36 mm; weight of case 536 grammes (approx. 1 lb. 3oz) A gold, double dialled and double open-faced, minute repeating clockwatch with Westminster chimes, grande and petite sonnerie, split seconds chronograph, registers for 60-minutes and 12-hours, perpetual calendar accurate to the year 2100, moon-phases, equation of time, dual power reserve for striking and going trains, mean and sidereal time, central alarm, indications for times of sunrise/sunset and a celestial chart for the night time sky of New York City at 40 degrees 41.0 minutes North latitude Accompanied by the original fitted tulipwood box inlaid with ebony and centered by a mother-of-pearl panel engraved with the arms of Henry Graves, Jr. Also accompanied by the Patek Philippe Certificate of Origin and an Extract from the Archives of Patek Philippe. The Henry Graves Jr. Supercomplication movement is unique. Patek Philippe ensured that each complication was designed specifically for this watch. Complex watch movements usually consisted of complications that were added to a simpler base calibre, however, the Supercomplication’s calibre was developed specifically for this single watch. The Supercomplication required the expertise of some of the finest watchmakers of the period, each skilled in the execution of particular components. These master makers had to work together to ensure that all complications within the watch were seamlessly combined with one another and presented in a case and with a dial of the finest design. After all, this watch was no mere flight of fancy; it was a special order and had to please its patron. This unique collaboration resulted in a watch that was not only the most complex in the world, but was also a timepiece of exceptional aesthetic beauty. Please see fig. 6 for the list of the Supercomplication's 24 complications. HENRY GRAVES, JR. Henry Graves, Jr. (1868-1953) was more than just a modern man at the beginning of the 20th century; he was an innovator. Born into a prominent banking family in Orange, NJ, his father, Henry Graves, Sr., was a partner in the banking firm of Maxwell & Graves located at 143 Liberty Street, New York City. Henry Graves, Jr. joined his father in the financial industry and moved to New York City. In 1896, Mr. Graves married Florence Isabel Preston of Irvington-on-Hudson, New York and they had four children. As a wealthy society family at the turn of the century, Mr. and Mrs. Graves had the luxury of owning several vacation homes in addition to their residence in New York City.  The family spent their summers at their homes in Irvington and Saranac, New York. In Saranac, the Graves owned Eagle Island, where Mr. Graves reveled in one of his sporting passions: boating. One of his treasured boats was the Eagle, a 50-foot speedboat. During the winter, the family spent time near Charleston, South Carolina where Mr. Graves was a member of the prestigious Yeaman’s Hall, an old plantation-turned-private club. The remainder of the year, the family lived at 420 Park Avenue in New York City, until the family moved to 834 Fifth Avenue in 1931. Mr. Graves would remain at his Fifth Avenue apartment until his death at the age of 86. Mr. Graves had a well-known appreciation for the arts. On 3rd April 1936, a single-owner sale was held at the American Art Association Anderson, Galleries, Inc., a predecessor of Sotheby’s in New York. The sale was titled "Masterpieces of Engraving and Etching: The Collection of Henry Graves, Jr." The introduction of the catalogue states: "The possibilities of collecting are revealed at their finest in the majority of the magnificent prints gathered by Mr. Graves. No other collection so rich in beauty, so carefully chosen, and in such splendid condition has ever been offered at public sale in this country." The highlight of the sale was Albrecht Dürer’s Adam and Eve, which brought an impressive $10,000. This price was truly remarkable at the time, given that the sale occurred in the midst of the Great Depression. In addition to Mr. Graves’ passion for fine art, he is remembered for his superb Patek Philippe collection of timepieces. Mr. Graves was introduced to the firm by his family jeweler, Tiffany & Co., and was impressed by Patek Philippe’s success in various timing contests at the Geneva Observatory. Mr. Graves began acquiring Patek Philippe timepieces in the 1910s, ultimately becoming one of the firm’s most notable patrons. Mr. Graves would either commission watches from the firm or would ask Patek Philippe to personalize timepieces he acquired with his family’s coat-of-ams. The Graves coat-of-arms bears an eagle rising out of a ducal coronet, along with the motto: Esse Quam Videri (To Be, Rather than to Seem). The majority of Mr. Graves’ watches are distinguished by the use of this Coat-of-Arms on the case or, as with the Supercomplication, on the watch’s box. Many of his pocket watches were further personalised: “Made for Henry Graves, Jr. New York.” In line with his own competitive spirit, Mr. Graves commissioned Patek Philippe to make him the most complicated watch – more complicated than James Ward Packard’s Patek Philippe with sky chart no. 198.023, the Leroy No. 1 and the “Marie Antoinette” by Breguet. Mr. Graves became the very proud owner of the Supercomplication on 19th January 1933 for the sum of 60,000 SF ($15,000). Weighing approximately 535g (1 lb. 3 ounces), the watch consists of 920 individual components including 430 screws, 110 wheels, 120 mechanical levers or parts and 70 jewels. The Supercomplication remained in Mr. Graves’ collection of timepieces until his death in 1953. His daughter, Gwendolen, inherited the Supercomplication and much of the collection and later gifted it onto her son, Reginald H. “Pete” Fullerton, Jr., in 1960.  Mr. Fullerton, Henry Graves, Jr.'s grandson, was the last descendant of the Graves family to own the Supercomplication until its sale to Seth G. Atwood, founder of the Time Museum, in 1969. THE CONTEST One of the few, very few, minor regrets that I may have had during the 36 exhilarating years of my association with Patek Philippe, Geneva, is that I was not around during an era which, today, is considered as being  the vintage years for a number of timepieces produced by the Manufactory, namely: between 1900 and 1935. During that era, two men in the U.S.A., vied with one another to order and acquire exceptional watches, either for their time-keeping qualities or their complex mechanisms. Interestingly enough, both chose Patek Philippe as their principal source of supply. Thus started a fascinating ‘contest’ between two gentlemen . . . who were nevertheless rivals in the field of horology. The first, Henry Graves, Jr. of New York, was essentially a sportsman and collector; but fortuitously born into a private banking family. The second was James Ward Packard of Warren, Ohio, the automobile manufacturer. First one, then the other of these two gentlemen would order from Patek Philippe in Geneva, timepieces with multiple horological complications. By 1916, Mr. Packard had edged in front of Mr. Graves in his bid to own the finest and most complex watch in the world. Indeed, in January of that year he took delivery of an impressive pocket-watch made by Patek Philippe and which incorporated 16 horological complications. Again, in April 1927 a further stunning pocket-watch with ten complications, including a celestial-chart, was delivered to Mr. Packard by Patek Philippe. However, neither piece could claim to be the most complicated watch ever made. For Mr. Graves, ever the sportsman and competitor, the challenge was irresistible. Unhesitatingly, he returned to the ‘contest’ with renewed determination. In strictest secrecy he once more approached Patek Philippe in Geneva with a monumental request, namely: to plan and construct “the most complicated watch ever made” The master-watchmakers at Patek Philippe, undaunted, returned to their respective ateliers and drawing-boards to ponder this new, exciting challenge. Obviously, computer assistance in the construction of complex horological mechanisms did not exist in those days. Exhaustive studies in the realms of astronomy, mathematics and precision mechanisms were necessary to achieve what then became the “world’s most complicated timepiece” incorporating 25 horological complications. The Supercomplication retained that title for an impressively long time: 56 years in total. By modern-day standards, the end result was achieved astonishingly quickly. Indeed, ‘only’ seven years were necessary, between 1925-1932, to research, develop and produce the chef-d’oeuvre ordered by Mr. Graves from Patek Philippe. The watch was delivered to Mr. Graves on 19th January 1933. Then, in 1989, to mark Patek Philippe’s 150th anniversary, they unveiled the Calibre 89 which incorporates 33 complications. Thus, the “Graves” watch lost its title…but to a worthy successor. For those who may have the privilege of actually handling this famous and extraordinary timepiece will, I am sure, experience an indefinable sensation. I certainly did! Alan Banbery Former Curator of the Patek Philippe Museum Geneva, October 2014 THE SIDEREAL DIAL The sidereal time dial was made between 1929 and 1932 from a gold plate with silvered finish. The three subsidiary dials for sunrise, sunset, and subsidiary sidereal seconds were recessed by circular engraving. The plate was then engraved and enamelled. Above the subsidiary sidereal seconds, the equation of time sector indicates the difference between the minutes of mean time and sidereal time. The sky chart is also made from a gold disc and is overlaid with champlevé blue enamel. The archives of Stern Frères show that Patek Philippe supplied the gold for the dial and paid 110 Francs for its construction. The Stern Frères archives still retain a copy of the original drawings for the dial which were submitted to Henry Graves, Jr. for his approval. The drawings appear in what is known as Stern Frères special design book. Dial details: Gold dial plate with silvered finish, black enamel Arabic dauphine numerals, outer minute track, large aperture revealing the sky chart surrounded with the cardinal points, the sky chart composed of a champlevé blue enamel over gold stars à paillons depicting approximately 450 stars and a magnificent representation of the Milky Way, the whole of the night sky for the exact longitude of Mr. Graves’ Manhattan apartment overlooking Central Park on Fifth Avenue, three sunken subsidiary dials for times of sunrise and  sunset in New York, and seconds combined with equation of time scale, ‘pear’ shaped blued steel hands, the dial plate engraved and enamelled and with large personal inscription reading “Made for Henry Graves Jr, New York 1932 by Patek, Philippe & Co. Geneva, Switzerland.” THE MEAN TIME DIAL The mean time dial was made by Stern Frères S.A. between 1929 and 1930 and is white enamel. The perfect aesthetics of the dial mask the extreme complexity of its construction. The dial has to accommodate seven layers of hands - the two split seconds hands, hour hand, minute hand, alarm hand, and double hands within either power reserve subsidiaries - all of which have to seamlessly glide above one another. In order to accommodate the unprecedented number of hands, the subsidiary dials are double sunk, and each are made from two separate enamel sections with their relevant calibrations. This allows extra depth to the dial, keeping the overall height between crystal and dial surface to a minimum and thereby minimizing the overall depth of the watch. Dial details: White enamel dial, black enamel radial Roman numerals chiffres Romaines regardants, style Genève, outer track for minutes and chronograph seconds indication for fifths of a second, double-sunk subsidiary dials for 60-minute and 12-hour registers combined with power reserves for striking and going trains respectively, further double-sunk subsidiary dial for subsidiary seconds and date, apertures for day, month and moon-phases, Breguet hour and minute hands, the subsidiary dials with feuille shaped hands, gold alarm indicator hand, all other hands blued steel. THE MOVEMENT TIER 1 The movement's core tier is double sided. Each side of the ocre accomodates an additional tier, thereby making a total of three tiers. The movement: 25''' damascened, two train, multi-layered plates with 70 jewels, signed and numbered on the movement band. Tier 1 Main plate with lever escapement, three first wheels of 14k gold, bi-metallic compensation balance, with gold regulating screws, adjusted to heat, cold, isochronism and five positions, unique balance regulator with aperture enabling regulation concealed under bezel, striking mechanism with two barrels, Westminster-type carillon, grande and petite sonnerie, with four hammer's striking four gongs, mean time train, power reserves for movement and strike, both chronograph mechanisms visible to back-hyphen plate of central tier. The chronograph is executed in a classic manner, however this complication utilizes a 12-hour register which is rarely seen on Patek Philippe watches. It is also notable that the chronograph function has a 60-minute register which is considerably more complex to integrate than the more standard 30-minute register. The grande sonnerie includes four hammers that strike four gongs to sound the passing hours and Westminster quarter hours, the petite sonnerie when activated merely strikes the passing Westminster quarter hours. The alarm employs a fifth hammer and a fifth gong to ring the alarm. Tier 2 - Under Mean Time Dial Plate with alarm, spring and lever layout for time and alarm triple-setting system, calendar, and moon-phases. The perpetual calendar is unusually displayed with the day of the week and month of the year both shown in rectangular windows. Tier 3 - Under Sidereal Time Dial Sidereal time train, sky chart mechanism, cams for equation of time, sunrise and sunset. The Sidereal Time train is constructed with three main wheels and makes one full revolution every sidereal day. The Supercomplication provides the complete sidereal time with hours, minutes and seconds indicated. This is the most accurate manner to display Sidereal time but also the most complex. The Sky Chart mechanism comprises the display plate itself with three wheels and one gear, all connected to the sidereal time and adjustable through the crown's hand setting function. THE CASE The case of the Supercomplication was made by Luc Rochat of L’Abbaye in the Vallée de Joux. The case is 73.2mm in diameter, 35mm thick including the crystals and weighs 535g (1 lb, 3 oz). The case by itself weighs an impressive 250g. The double open-faced case is of classic bassine design. Both bezels are impressively thick to accommodate the depth of the dials and their hands. Each bezel has a concealed hinge, which represents the highest quality of such design. Despite the watch’s impressive size, it is exceptionally well proportioned; this is a testament to the careful planning and extraordinary collaboration between the master watchmakers, dial makers, and case maker who, between them, ensured that every cubic millimeter of space was used with the greatest efficiency. Almost five years were required from the design of the case to its final delivery, during which time hundreds of adjustments were made to ensure every function allowed by the slides and pushers was precise and smooth. The case incorporates 13 operational functions. Facing the watch from the mean time side and running around the case in a clockwise direction from the crown these are: 1. winding device, turning to one side for the main barrel and to the other side for the chime 2. pulling the crown, first position for the mean time, second position for the sidereal time setting 3. chronograph main start/stop coaxial device 4. moon-phase adjuster 5. alarm winding sliding device 6. petite/grande sonnerie selection slide 7. minute repeat trigger slide 8. adjuster for months of the year 9. adjuster for days of the week 10.  adjuster for date of the month 11. the strike/silent option, selected via a slide 12. the split device pusher 13. pusher to engage hand-setting when crown is pulled out SUMMARY OF THE MAJOR FUNCTIONS Perpetual Calendar with Moon-Phases The perpetual calendar shows the correct day of the week, date of the month and month of the year regardless of the length of the month. It also automatically adjusts for the leap year. The aperture for moon-phases shows the correct phase and age of the moon. Since the duration of the Solar year is 365 days, 5 hours, 48 minutes and 48 seconds and the mean year is 365 days, an extra year is added every four years (leap year) and a further adjustment is made with the omission of a leap year every four centuries. According to the Gregorian calendar reforms of 1582, century years that are divisible by 400 without remainder are to be considered leap years. Consequently, the perpetual calendar of the Supercomplication will be accurate until the year 2100, when the calendar will need to be readjusted for the first time. The Westminster Chimes, Repeater and Alarm Grande Sonnerie with Westminster chimes. Selected via a slide on the case band, this function strikes the hours and quarters at every quarter. The five gongs hammer for the carillon are separate from the alarm. Petite Sonnerie selected via the slide on the case band, this function strikes the passing quarter hours. Minute Repeater Selected on demand via the case band, the watch strikes the passing quarter hours and minutes. The Westminster chime, made famous by the Westminster London clock popularly known as ‘Big Ben,’ was first used in St. Mary’s Church, Cambridge in 1793. The chime tune itself was taken from the fifth bar of Handel’s aria from the Messiah, “I know that my Redeemer liveth.” Split Seconds chronograph The split seconds chronograph can be used to time up to two events at the same time. The chronograph is started, stopped and reset via the pusher at the center of the winding crown. When the chronograph is running, the split pusher which is located in the case band between 10 and 11 o’clock (when looking at the mean time dial) can be pressed to stop one of the central chronograph seconds hands, leaving the other to continue alone. Whilst the chronograph is running, minutes elapsed will be counted on the subsidiary dial to the right and hours to the left on the mean time dial. Sidereal Time and Equation of Time The Henry Graves Jr. Supercomplication has hours, minutes and seconds of sidereal time, the time of sunrise and sunset (calibrated for New York City) and the equation of time. This sidereal complication requires a transmission ratio of exactly 1.0027379092, which is driven by a 62 tooth wheel on the arbor of the fourth wheel. Sidereal time is based on the amount of time it takes the Earth to make two consecutive transitions of a meridian by a fixed star. By measuring the transits of a fixed star, one is able to measure the actual time it takes for the Earth to turn on its axis. This period of time is known as a sidereal day which is approximately 23 hours, 56 minutes and 4.1 seconds. The equation of time indicator on the Supercomplication watch is calibrated to show the difference between apparent solar time (the time as indicated by a sundial) and mean time (the average of solar time). Since the Earth is in an elliptical orbit, the difference between mean and solar time ranges from plus 14 minutes 59 seconds to minus 16 minutes 15 seconds. Solar time agrees with mean time on or about 15th April, 15th June, 31st August, and 24th December. The Supercomplication watch indicates the equation of time on a sector-shaped scale with calibrations for plus/minus 17 minutes. The equation of time mechanism is driven by an arbor that protrudes through the movement from the calendar mechanism. The spelling ‘sideral’ on the dial of the watch is the French form of the word; the English spelling being ‘sidereal.’ The Star Chart The Supercomplication’s star chart rotates anti-clockwise behind the oval aperture of the dial. The shape of the aperture allows one to see the night sky as seen from New York City, complete with magnitudes of the stars and the Milky Way. PROVENANCE & TIMELINE Provenance Henry Graves, Jr., New York, January 1933 Gwendolen Graves Fullerton, by descent from the above, New York, 1953 Reginald H. “Pete” Fullerton, by gift from the above, New York, 1960 Time Museum, Rockford, Illinois, Inventory no. 4443, 1969 Sotheby’s, New York, Masterpieces from the Time Museum, 2 December 1999, lot 7 Private Collection Exhibited Rockford, Illinois, The Time Museum, 1970-1999 Geneva, The Patek Philippe Museum, 2001-2005 Literature “The Summum of complication,” Journal Suisse d’Horologie, December 1932, pp. 36-37. “Watches: These are the Best Built in the World,” Life Magazine, 23 December 1940, p. 31. “The World’s Most Complicated Watch,” Patek Philippe Newsletter, May 1960, pp. 2-3. Eugene Jaquet and Alfred Chapuis, Technique and History of the Swiss Watch, New York, 1970, pl. 122-123. Cecil Clutton and George Daniels, Watches, London, 1979 (3rd ed.), pl. 377a-e. Rheinhard Meis, Taschenuhren: Von d. Halsuhr zum Tourbillon, Munich, 1979, pl. 848-850. Seth G. Atwood and William Andrews, The Time Museum an Introduction, Rockford, 1983,  p. 30. Martin Huber and Alan Banbery, Patek Philippe, Geneva, 1983 (vol. 1, 1st ed.), pp. 250-257, pls. 232a-h. Martin Huber and Alan Banbery, Patek Philippe, Geneva, 1993, (vol. 1, 2nd ed.), pp. 88-91, pls. 237-239h. David S. Landes, Revolution in Time: Clocks and the Making of the Modern World, Boston, 1983, pp. 448-449. Patek Philippe S.A., Star Calibre 2000, Geneva, 2000, pp. 20-21. Arthur Lubow, “Complicated Collectors,” Patek Philippe Museum, Geneva, Autumn/Winter 2002, pp. 36-41. Stacy Perman, A Grand Complication: The Race to Build the World’s Most Legendary Watch, New York, 2013. Timeline Please see fig. 9 for the timeline of The Henry Graves Jr. Supercomplication. Acknowledgements We are grateful to the following individuals for their guidance and assistance with the creation of this catalogue: Patricia Atwood, Alan Banbery, Alex Barter, Sylvie Dricourt, Peter Friess, Stacy Perman, Martin H. Wehrli, Béatrice Widemann, and of course, Patek Philippe.

  • CHESuisse
  • 2014-11-11
Prix ​​d'adjudication
Voir le prix

Nu allongé I (Aurore)

Henri Matisse patinated bronze Conceived in Collioure in 1907 and cast by Bingen-Costenoble, Paris, circa 1908, this work is number 3 from an edition of 10 plus 1 artist's proof numbered 0/10.Phillips wishes to thank:Les Archives Matisse and Mrs Wanda de Guébriant for their expertise Mrs Elizabeth Royer for her extensive research on the provenance of this workDr Charles Stuckey for his contribution to the catalogue entry Number 1:Cast circa 1908In the collection of the Musée National d'Art Moderne, Centre Georges-Pompidou, ParisNumber 2:Cast circa 1908Private Collection Number 3:The present workNumber 4:Cast circa 1912In the collection of the Albright–Knox Art Gallery, Room of Contemporary Art Fund, BuffaloNumber 5:Cast circa 1912Christie’s, New York, 9 November 1999, lot 504Number 6:Cast circa 1930In the collection of the Baltimore Museum of Art, MarylandNumber 7:Cast circa 1930In the collection of the Musée d'Art Moderne de la Ville de Paris, ParisNumber 8:Cast circa 1930Phillips, New York, 7 May 2001, lot 17Number 9:Cast circa 1948Private CollectionNumber 10:Cast circa 1951Christie’s, New York, 19 November 1986, lot 26In the collection of the Nasher Sculpture Center, Texas Number 0:Cast 1951In the Artist’s family collectionNu allongé I, finished in 1907, and first cast in bronze shortly afterwards, was singled out as 'one of Matisse's masterpieces' by perhaps the artist's best informed advocate, Alfred H. Barr, Jr., the founding director of the Museum of Modern Art, in his seminal, Matisse, His Art and his Public, 1951. As if to suggest that Nu allongé I is the quintessential Matisse sculpture, it was selected for the dust jacket of The Sculpture of Henri Matisse, the classic account by Albert E. Elsen, published in 1972. Posed with her muscular limbs twisting across her torso gymnastically to find equilibrium like a three‐dimensional seesaw, balanced from every point of view, Matisse's Nu allongé I introduces one of the hallmark motifs that Matisse returned to throughout his career.Many of his most ambitious pre‐World‐War‐I figure paintings feature variations on this same sinuous pose, several of these displayed prominently on the left side of his intensely self‐revealing Red Studio, 1911 (MoMA). Such iconic Matisse works as The Pink Nude (Baltimore Museum of Art), 1935; his great charcoal drawings of 1938; and even his 1952 paper cut‐out Blue Nudes are all reprises of the pose first perfected in Nu allongé I. Engaged by the sculpture's complexity, Pablo Picasso immediately began to develop his own versions of this abstract pose and continued to do so throughout his own long career. Hardly less modern with the passage of time, Nu allongé I takes pride of place among the paradigms of 20th‐century style celebrated in the art about art mural proposed by Roy Lichtenstein in 1997 for the Bellagio Hotel.The fundamentally traditional pose of a luxuriating female nude goddess from the Golden Age, alluding to famous images of Ariadne and Venus in Greco‐Roman sculpture and Renaissance paintings, appeared obsessively in Matisse's most ambitious exhibition works from 1905 with Luxe, Calme et Volupté. In the spring of that same year, the celebrated Auguste Rodin (to whom Matisse once showed his drawings for critique) presented his Ariane at the Salon des Beaux‐Arts, an armless reclining nude posed as she pivots her weight on her hip just like Matisse's Nu allongé I would do. And at the Salon d'automne of 1905 Renoir exhibited one of the monumental horizontal format paintings of a reclining female nude that preoccupied him now that bad arthritis prevented him from lifting his arm. It was at this same exhibition that Aristide Maillol won lavish praise for a sculpture eventually entitled La Mediterranée, a perfectly proportioned female nude, posed seated with her arms and legs in interlocking silhouettes.The figure of a nude reclining on the ground was again at the epicenter of Matisse's monumental painting, Le Bonheur de vivre, presented in 1906 at the Salon des Indépendants and acquired by the expatriate American writers, Gertrude and Leo Stein. These increasingly avid collectors famously patronised Picasso no less than Matisse, befriending them both and nurturing an essential dialogue between the two emerging leaders of modern art. Their brother Michael Stein and his wife Sarah acquired one of the three earliest bronze casts of Nu allongé I as part of the display of Matisse works in their Paris apartment. The present lot is likewise one of these rare early casts by Bingen et Costenoble, the foundry used by Maillol. Meanwhile Leo Stein acquired Matisse's nearly life‐sized Blue Nude (Baltimore Museum of Art), which was created in response to this same tabletop sculpture.By 1900 Matisse was seriously interested in making sculptures, but his output was sporadic throughout his long career. He first exhibited a few of them in early 1906, including a statuette of a standing female nude posed with her knee bent and her elbows raised to her head. Figures with raised elbows appear frequently in works by two of Matisse's favorite masters, Rodin and Paul Cézanne, largely predicated on Michelangelo's Dying Slave in the Louvre, and the reclining figure of Dawn from his Medici tomb complex in Florence. (Indeed, given the obvious similarities, Nu allongé I has sometimes been called Aurore.) Michelangelo's works were widely reproduced around 1875 to commemorate the four hundredth anniversary of his birth. Matisse's interest in the raised elbow pose is first evident in 1903 when Matisse made a roughly modeled replica of a work then attributed to Michelangelo, a seated male nude with his left elbow dramatically elevated. Oddly, this raised elbow is missing from Matisse's fragmentary replica, as if it had broken off accidentally, but Matisse nevertheless wanted to preserve the visual impact of his work in its incomplete or damaged state. Nu allongé I was the last of four statuettes that preoccupied Matisse in 1906, one of three to feature raised elbows. Thirty‐five years after the fact Matisse still vividly recalled how Nu allongé I also suffered accidental damage.When asked about his work as a sculptor by writer and critic Pierre Courthion in 1941, (pp. 85‐86), Matisse explained that after he arrived for a long stay in Collioure in November of 1906, he often took the train to visit Maillol, in nearby Banyuls. Starting out as a painter, Maillol had only turned to sculpture in his mid‐thirties, but by 1906 he was acclaimed by Rodin as the finest sculptor of his generation. As he modeled Nu allongé I in clay, Matisse surely was mindful of Maillol's demanding criteria for modern figure sculpture in the round. That notwithstanding, Matisse was so absorbed in refining this time‐consuming work that one day he missed his train to Banyuls, and his sculpture in progress was damaged when it accidentally slid to the floor. The extended elbow would be especially vulnerable. Rather than continue, Matisse put Nu allongé I aside and painted his monumental Blue Nude (Baltimore Museum of Art), seemingly in response to Renoir's horizontal nudes with bodies that fill nearly the entirety of the canvas. Observed from above, the figure in Blue Nude is posed like Nu allongé I, but it seems restricted when compared with the sculpture that he had considered from every possible angle as if its different silhouettes were facets of a prism. 'The bronze is less imposing in size than The Blue Nude yet, in a sense, the big painting served as a study for the sculpture,' according to Barr. 'The sculpture is more powerfully composed, the distortions bolder, particularly in the bent but towering left arm. No sculpture by Matisse is more admirably designed to interest the eye and satisfy the sense of rhythmic contrapposto when seen from different points of view.' (p. 100). Nevertheless, the painting amounts to a full‐scale version of the tabletop bronze, as if Matisse was curious to see the impact of a monumental version of his sculpture. In his painting, Music Lesson (Barnes), 1916, Matisse indeed imagines a large version of Nu allongé I, as his garden sculpture.There are telling similarities and differences between Nu allongé I and Maillol's sculptures. Counterbalancing their models' bent and extended arms and legs in rhythmic harmonies, both artists treated the poses as abstract structural compositions rather than as familiar actions. But whereas Maillol sought perfection overall, in the proportions of his figures and the refinement of every detail from the navel to the toes, Matisse preferred to emphasize his own evident struggles as an artist in the process of obtaining perfect compositional harmony. Matisse ignored inessential anatomical details like fingers and in the spirit of Rodin he emphasised traces of his own finger marks as they added or removed clay from body shapes to get the right mass or silhouette. Concerned no less with his final form than with the process of its making, in his bronzes Matisse not only preserved traces of his fingers and scalpel or spatula in roughly handled textures, but he also preserved the seams of the moulds used in casting, as Rodin often did. Observed close up, the back of the Nu allongé I's left shoulder is full of imperfections that appealed to the artist, who was determined for his work to stand apart from tasteful figure sculptures. Starting around now for the remainder of his long career, no matter what medium he used, Matisse found ways to express the intimate theme of his own artistic process, a theme hardly less paramount for Picasso. A double image of awareness and self‐ awareness, Nu allongé I is as much, if not more, the image of the making of the sculpture as it is the image of a nude woman. For art historian Jack Flam Nu allongé I is 'one of Matisse's most dissonant works, characterized by extreme anatomical distortions and abrupt turnings of form in space.' Indeed, for Flam the exaggerated size of some body parts, like the left arm, and their lack of proportion to each other may be an indication of Matisse's enthusiasm for African figure sculptures with articulated limbs. Whatever the case may be, the upper torso of Nu allongé I, with its too widely spaced breasts, appears too large in relationship to the figure's waist, and from some angles the raised left elbow appears strangely as large as the hip and thigh. It is the perfectly integrated composite of separate, imperfectly matched, parts into a final abstract whole of stunning harmony that makes Nu allongé I so masterful.Matisse's personal satisfaction with Nu allongé I is evident from how during the next ten years he included the (now lost) plaster cast of his sculpture into a series of remarkable still‐life paintings and domestic scenes, as if his sculpture should be understood as a special touchstone, a miniature three‐dimensional muse at ease presiding in his abstract depictions of two‐dimensional pictorial spaces. With these still‐lifes Matisse paid ongoing hommage to Édouard Vuillard who included a plaster of Maillol's statuette Leda alongside cut flowers and other domestic items in several still‐lifes from the early 1900s. As for Picasso, his immediate response to Nu allongé I has often been noted in the series of abstract nudes with raised elbows and twisted poses that he made in 1907, culminating in his historic Les Demoiselles d'Avignon. But it is not until 1998 that critic Yve‐Alain Bois first analysed Picasso's second, seemingly delayed reaction to Matisse's sculpture around 1930. He pointed out how Matisse's sculptures returned to Picasso's attention thanks to a special feature in a 1928 issue of the lavish art periodical Cahiers d'art, illustrating sculptures made by modern painters and shortly afterwards in the summer of 1930 by an exhibition of Matisse's sculptures at the Galerie Pierre. Picasso immediately embarked on a group of profoundly abstract figurative sculptures at his new Boisgeloup studio, including a reclining nude with her elbow raised, consisting of interlocking body parts disproportionate to one another, many out of place with reference to the rules of anatomy with respect to one another. These sculptures led directly in 1932 to a series of paintings of Picasso's young mistress Marie‐Thérèse Walter in poses similar to those used by Matisse.By the most fortunate coincidence this sale also includes Picasso's masterpiece, La Dormeuse, (see lot no. 10) a monumental horizontal format image made on March 13, 1932, that represents the young woman asleep, the outlines of her body captured in arcing lines for the arms and buttocks, with stylized signs for her breasts and vulva, her anatomy distorted to display every side of her nudity at once. Traces of slightly all but erased lines show where Picasso first thought to position the breasts more prominently. More important these erasures seemingly document the artist's need to revise his portrayal of her as her body turned and twisted while she slept, her face at first turned up, and subsequently turned down to rest against her arms. Sharing Matisse's profound interest in representing the creative process itself, with traces of the needed corrections, Picasso in La Dormeuse seems once again to respond to Matisse's great Nu allongé I. Indeed for the remainder of their careers both artists felt compelled to make figures that twist to reveal themselves in every way at once. Matisse most explicitly revisited his Nu allongé I, not to mention Picasso's versions of similar poses, with Pink Nude, 1935, documenting the stages of its evolution in a series of twenty‐two photographs, the reclining nude’s arms and legs twisting now one way, now another. No wonder that when Matisse visited Antibes in April 1948 to see recent works by Picasso in the Palais Grimaldi, he was especially intrigued with a horizontal work on plywood representing a reclining nude with her elbow raised over her head.

  • GBRGrande Bretagne
  • 2018-03-08
Prix ​​d'adjudication
Voir le prix

An iconic, highly attractive, and historically important stainless

Rolex When an original Rolex “Paul Newman” Daytona is offered for sale, collectors take notice. To own one is a dream for so many. This absolutely fresh to the market watch is the “Paul Newman” Daytona after which all others came second. Likely purchased in 1968, Joanne Woodward chose this reference 6239 fitted with an ‘exotic’ dial, as a gift for Paul Newman as his passion for motorsport was just beginning. Throughout his lifetime, Mr. Newman was seen wearing several generations of Daytona models. This is the first and only ‘exotic’ dial Daytona he wore, making it the ultimate Rolex Daytona wristwatch. This wristwatch has been worn by Paul Newman lovingly over the years, but also well preserved by the consignor, James Cox. The case retains its original proportions, lines, and edges, and in our view, has never been polished. The wonderful, “DRIVE CAREFULLY ME” engraving on the case back is perfectly crisp and completely intact.Likely to have been originally purchased at Tiffany & Co. in New York, an inventory number possibly engraved by the luxury retailer is found on the underside of the left lug. The dial has developed a creamy, warm patina that is consistent with its age. The luminous hour markers have also aged charismatically along with the luminous hands – all completely original and intact. It comes accompanied with a signed letter written by Paul Newman’s daughter, Nell Newman, documenting its provenance and her support of its sale. The Daytona is a model that will forever be associated with Paul Newman, made famous by him thanks to this very timepiece. The present lot therefore presents a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to own one of the most mythical, most important, and most recognizable watches of the 20th century. It’s now being sold for the first time since leaving the inner circle of the Newman family, nearly 50 years after its purchase by Joanne Woodward. We are thrilled to offer it here, with a portion of the proceeds going to The Nell Newman Foundation and Newman’s Own Foundation, in support of Paul Newman’s philanthropic values. Its impeccable provenance, incredible “DRIVE CAREFULLY ME” engraving from Joanne Woodward, and wonderful original condition make Paul Newman’s “Paul Newman” Daytona one of the world’s most precious – and most priceless – timepieces. Ever.

  • USAUSA
  • 2017-10-26
Prix ​​d'adjudication
Voir le prix
Annonce

Daytime Astronomy (Grasshopper)

Daytime Astronomy (Grasshopper) is a spectacular distillation of all the elements that have made Peter Doig one of the most celebrated painters of his generation. Thick impasto on the tree trunks in the upper register and the vegetation in the foreground give way to beautifully modulated washes that comprise the sky and landscape. Jewel-like specks of colour in the windows of the house, reminiscent of the ornamented wall in the 2000-02 masterpiece Gasthof zur Muldentalsperre (Art Institute of Chicago), provide an extraordinarily effective visual anchor for the composition, while the tri-partite structure of the work bears comparison to early paintings such as The House that Jacques Built from 1992 (Tel-Aviv Museum of Art), or Blotter from 1993 (Manchester, Walker Art Gallery). Having resided in the same collection since 1999, it shares its subject with only one other picture, Daytime Astronomy, which is universally regarded as one of the artists greatest pictures and was included in many of his most celebrated solo-shows, including Blizzard Seventy-Seven, a travelling exhibition which culminated at the Whitechapel Gallery in 1999, and Peter Doig, Charleys Space, which travelled from Maastricht to Nimes in the early 2000s. Showcasing the immense invention inherent in Doigs response to the masters of twentieth-century art, Daytime Astronomy (Grasshopper) is a perfect realisation of Doigs immense technical and conceptual awareness, and serves as a testimony to his status as one of the greatest painters working today. Like all the greatest paintings by Doig, Daytime Astronomy (Grasshopper) is inspired by a wide array of sources, drawn from both the artists memory and from photographs and film-stills. Compositionally unframed, the painting offers a landscape redolent of a vista glimpsed from the window of a car, of the unspecified edifices and landscapes that whip by unexamined; but this is not an anonymous building, and the figure in the foreground is not an anonymous man. Indeed, for an artist such as Doig, who is keenly aware of the artists who preceded him, Hans Namuths photograph of Jackson Pollock sitting in the grass outside his East Hampton studio, a primary source for the present work, is of immense importance. The singular impact of Pollock on the trajectory of twentieth-century art is not lost on Doig, but even this titan is only subtly included, his raised knees providing a slight undulation to the landscape. This apparent slight is due to the immense intricacy of Doigs composition, which does not permit a focal point to emerge. Broadly, the painting is split into three defined sections: a dark foreground that takes up nearly half of the painting, which is itself subdivided into four sections by slender black lines; a central section which begins in line with Pollocks reclining figure and ends with the band of white paint towards the top of the composition; and a smaller hallucinatory skyscape that crowns the picture plane. This subdivision of the canvas enables Doig to walk a tightrope of figuration and abstraction, referencing both his American predecessors and European contemporaries, while simultaneously allowing his specific genius to shine through. The various art-historical influences evident in this work should not be overlooked. There are undeniable echoes of Mark Rothko in the segmented layering of the composition, as well as in the immense power afforded to the colours Doig uses, with the opaque greens and browns of the bottom register segueing to delicate coloured washes in the upper layers. More generally, the intertwining of foreground and background and the immense deliberation of every visual mark owes a great deal to the Abstract Expressionist movement as a whole. However, it should not be assumed that all of these references are simply an homage to those who came before; at times they are an inversion. Torqueing the vertical shafts of Barnett Newmans Zip paintings by flipping them horizontally, Doig enables entire worlds to be built within the confines of a horizontal band that Newman saw as a substantive streak of light. Speaking about the American masters work, Doig observed: I did like the idea that maybe these sections which had been opened up to reveal a strip of existence could just as easily close down again (Peter Doig cited in: Paul Bonaventura, Peter Doig: A Hunter in the Snow, Artefactum, No. 9, 1994, p. 14). This ephemerality is of pivotal importance to the present work, but runs entirely in contrast to the spiritual permanence of Newmans gigantic canvases. The conceit of the scene presented is that this is a landscape glimpsed peripherally; this is not a painting of nature, nor an idealised vision of it. Whereas the light that shows through in Newmans Zip paintings points to the divine, Doigs Zips insist upon a human presence. This sense of humanity is combined with a definite feeling of mystery. Clearly it is daytime the only figure we see is lying in the grass outside however the sky darkens in places and lightens in others. The flowers in the foreground are amorphous blotches of red, growths that pepper the organic lower section of the canvas; however the three horizontal abstract ridges of paint that cut through the canvas stand in cold opposition to that natural composition. The perspective shifts radically from the first to second band of the picture plane, from a block-like frontal view to a foreshortened landscape adorned by the house and trees. Finally, a crest of white paint across the upper register serves as a nod to the influence of man over his natural landscape a telephone line that cuts through the scenery. These juxtapositions lend compositional tension to the painting, as well as a sense of intrigue. As Richard Shiff explains: Doigs paintings create memories from mazes of disorienting detail. They show something familiar that nevertheless looks unsettlingly weird, or something weird that looks familiar (Richard Shiff, Drift, cited in: Catherine Lampert and Richard Shiff, Eds. Peter Doig, New York 2011, p. 323). He conjures a sense of alien familiarity, at once nostalgic and enigmatic. It is in this ambiguity and ambivalence that the inventiveness and precision of Doigs panting is revealed. For all that there are debts owed throughout art history, from the Abstract Expressionists to Gustav Klimts jewel-like paintings of nature and Monets juxtaposition of the bucolic and the industrial, it is with Gerhard Richter that Doigs practice resonates the most. As outlined by Johanne Sloan: Doig joins the company of others in the contemporary art world who manage to bring the practice of painting up against cinema, video, photography, computer screens, and other kinds of visual technologies. Gerhard Richter is one of the foremost figures in this respect, in that he has investigated this threshold with great intensity over the course of his career (Johanne Sloan, Hallucinating Landscape in: Exh. Cat. Vancouver, Morris and Helen Belkin Art Gallery, Peter Doig, 2001, p. 12). Aligned to Richters postmodern re-validation of painting as an art form within an age of mechanical reproduction, Doigs thematisation of the virtual screen confers a wholesale reinvention of the genre of epic landscape painting. His studio based practice utilises a vast visual archive of images culled from newspapers, postcards, film and album covers, as well as a stock of his own amateur video footage and photography of the landscape surrounding his parental home in Canada. For instance, the term Grasshopper, which appears in many of the artists works, refers both to the insect-like stance of the figure and a quotation Doig found in a book on ice-hockey that referenced the words of a nineteenth-century settler in Canadas western prairies: Man is a grasshopper here, a mere insect making way between the enormous discs of heaven and earth, a quotation that, perhaps partly, informed the tripartite arrangement of this work and many others. Drawing on these disparate sources Doig taps into and indeed creates a collective virtual memory by sampling paradigms from art history and the ready-made images that infiltrate our everyday visual experience. In the artists words, People have confused my paintings with being just about my own memories But I am more interested in the idea of memory (Peter Doig cited in: Exh. Cat. London, Tate Britain (and travelling), Peter Doig, 2008, p. 21). This virtual memory created by Doig is dreamlike. It is unstable and temporally fluid, lacking a fixed identity. As a result, his paintings are deeply personal, and yet, the incidents and visions are left sufficiently open that any given person can harness and be affected by them. As Doig explains, he uses his own experience [to] think about things that are a part of other peoples experience (Peter Doig cited in: Paul Bonaventura, op. cit., p. 15). This desire explains the lack of straight landscapes in Doigs work he wants them to be be humanised by a person or a building, something that suggests habitation, which allows the viewer to experience the picture directly. Detached from a specific period or location, Daytime Astronomy (Grasshopper) is a poetic testimony to the power of memory and image, and to the essential humanity of painting. Virtuosic in its exacting technique, which sees perspectival shifts and impasto peaks combine with modulated washes and jewel-like flecks of colour, the present work shows Doig at the height of his powers. Signed, titled and dated 98 99 on the reverse

  • GBRGrande Bretagne
  • 2018-06-26
Prix ​​d'adjudication
Voir le prix

AUDUBON, John James (1785-1851)

AUDUBON, John James (1785-1851). The Birds of America; from Original Drawings. London: Published by the Author, 1827-1838. The exceptional Duke of Portland set of Audubon's masterpiece – among the finest copies in private hands of this icon of American art, and the finest color-plate book ever produced. Four volumes, double-elephant folio (c.977 x c.645mm). Complete with the engraved title-page in each volume and with 435 hand-colored copperplate etchings with aquatint and engraving, by William Home Lizars and Robert Havell Jr. after original life-size watercolor drawings by Audubon assisted by Joseph Mason [some botanical details], George Lehman [some backgrounds], Maria Martin [some botany and entomology], and his sons John and Victor Audubon; printed by Robert Havell Sr. and Robert Havell Jr. on J Whatman and J Whatman Turkey Mill paper watermarked 1827 to 1838 [see Appendix B for a list of the watermarks appearing throughout this set]. Bound in contemporary red morocco by royal bookbinder John Mackenzie (1788-c.1850), signed with his stamp, with blank flyleaves watermarked "J Whatman 1838". [Complete with the text volumes:] AUDUBON, John James. Ornithological Biography, or an Account of the Habits of the Birds of the United States of America; accompanied by descriptions of the objects represented in the work entitled The Birds of America. Edinburgh: Adam and Charles Black, 1831-1849 [i.e. 1839]. Five volumes, octavo (255 x 157mm). Bound in contemporary red morocco by Mackenzie, uniform with the plate volumes. Condition of the plates A superlative copy in excellent condition, the plates with fresh and vibrant original coloring. See Appendix B for condition details of the plates individually. In general, defects are minor and include: some minor tears and a very few small paper flaws neatly repaired; light offsetting from some plates onto the blank verso of the facing leaf; occasional light spotting, chiefly marginal; the largest plates with a few instances of the caption being partly obscured by the binding, shaved or cropped; occasional shallow creases; occasional finger soiling in some margins. The first five plates in volume I are on contemporary guards. A copy of an independent conservation report is available on request. Variants in the text and plates The title-page of volume I is in the first state [i.e. before the addition of a volume number and composed in 13 lines, before the addition of two lines listing Audubon's affiliation to various learned societies]; the first ten plates are all engraved by William Lizars alone [i.e. before retouching by Robert Havell], and all the remaining plates in this volume are also early states, with Arabic numbering when called for [these are numbered 11-14, XV, 16-100]. See Appendix A for a list of the captions in the first ten plates, and Appendix B for a list of the imprints throughout. Binding John Mackenzie (1788-c.1850) flourished in the second quarter of the 19th century, during which time he held the office of Bookbinder to both King George IV and King William IV. Mackenzie is noted for his use of richly gilt hard-grain morocco leather, most prominently on the natural history and color-plate books of preeminent noble collections, including in the Broxbourne and Grenville libraries. Contemporary English red morocco by John Mackenzie, signed with his stamp on the front free endpaper of each plate volume, the blank flyleaves watermarked "J Whatman 1838"; the covers gilt with a roll-tooled outer border and central panel, and with a stylized scallop-shell tool at the outer corners of the central panel; the spines richly gilt in compartments and with green morocco lettering- and numbering pieces; marbled endpapers; board edges and turn-ins gilt; edges gilt (front hinges strengthened and some minor wear expertly repaired by James & Stuart Brockman Ltd; light wear at the extremities; faint darkening to the boards of some plate volumes). The plate volumes housed in individual red leather-backed clamshell cases, and the text volumes housed together in one matching case, all by J. & S. Brockman Ltd. Edition size and rarity Audubon's final list of subscribers to The Birds of America comprises 161 entries, although a somewhat larger number of complete sets was certainly produced. Bibliographers estimate that the edition is likely to have comprised 175 to 200 completed copies. Susanne Low, in her various updates to Fries' 1973 census, concludes that 120 complete copies are known to survive; of these, 107 are in institutions "such as universities, libraries, museums, athenaeums, societies, and the like". Of the thirteen sets in private collections, the Portland copy is undoubtedly among the very finest. Provenance The Dukes of Portland (c.1839-2012; sold Christie's New York, 20 January 2012, to:) – Carl W. Knobloch, Jr., gifted to: – The Knobloch Family Foundation. William Henry Cavendish-Scott-Bentinck (1768-1854), 4th Duke of Portland, probably purchased this set as a completed set soon after Audubon finished his project in 1838, and commissioned the binding from Mackenzie. Portland was the eldest son of Prime Minister William Cavendish-Bentinck, 3rd Duke of Portland; he served in various positions in the governments of George Canning and Lord Goderich, including as Lord President of the Council. All the evidence suggests that the 4th Duke was the original purchaser; the binding is strictly contemporary (the endpapers are watermarked 1838), with no trace of earlier ownership, and other books in the library known to have been bought by the 4th Duke underscore his serious interest in natural history. Each volume in this set bears the armorial bookplate of his descendant William, 6th Duke of Portland. According to the keepers at Welbeck Abbey, seat of the Dukes of Portland, there is no consistency in the "bookplating" of the library: many books certainly acquired by the 4th Duke have no earlier bookplate than that of the 6th Duke, and others do not have a bookplate at all. While it is possible that the set was acquired by the 5th Duke of Portland, after the 4th Duke died in 1854, or by the 6th Duke when he inherited the estate in 1879, this is unlikely: Audubon returned to America in September 1839 taking with him the remaining fifteen copies still with the engraver; these he sold by 1850, recording the names of the buyers (see Fries pp. 122-23). William John Cavendish-Scott-Bentinck, 5th Duke of Portland (1800-1879), was a notable eccentric who preferred his own company and excavated an extensive network of tunnels and rooms under the estate, including an underground library and ballroom. William John Cavendish-Bentinck, 6th Duke of Portland (1857-1943), inherited the estate from his cousin in 1879. The 6th Duke was rather more sociable than his reclusive predecessor: he carried the imperial state crown during the coronation ceremony of King George VI. Earlier, in 1913, he hosted Archduke Franz Ferdinand during his visit to England, and took him shooting on the estate. Portland records in his memoirs that "one of the loaders fell down. This caused both barrels of the gun he was carrying to be discharged, the shot passing within a few feet of the Archduke and myself. I have often wondered if the Great War might not have been averted, or at least postponed, had the archduke met his death there and not at Sarajevo the following year" (Men, Women and Things, London: 1937). Context A magic power transported us into the forests which for so many years this man of genius had trod. Learned and ignorant alike were astonished at the spectacle... Imagine a landscape wholly American, trees, flowers, grass, even the tints of the sky and the waters, quickened with a life that is real, peculiar, trans-Atlantic. On twigs, branches, bits of shore, copied by the brush with the strictest fidelity, sport the feathered races of the New World, in the size of life, each in its particular attitude, its individuality and peculiarities. Their plumages sparkle with nature's own tints; you see them in motion or at rest, in their plays and their combats... It is a real and palpable vision of the New World, with its atmosphere, its imposing vegetation, and its tribes which know not the yoke of man... And this realization of an entire hemisphere, this picture of a nature so lusty and strong, is due to the brush of a single man; such an unheard-of triumph of patience and genius! – Philatère Chasles, reviewing Audubon's December 1826 exhibition at the Edinburgh Royal Institution. With his timeless masterpiece, Audubon revealed America's natural splendor to the world and to itself. America, as Audubon found it when the 18-year old emigrated from France in 1803, was a country of barely 6 million people, two-thirds of them living within 50 miles of the Atlantic coast. Lewis and Clark were just setting out West. It was a rugged, young country in which many priorities trumped the drawing of creatures that were primarily seen as food rather than legitimate subjects of artistic consideration. Audubon is now recognized as America's first preeminent watercolorist, but his goal through the decades was always The Birds of America. The culmination of his own artistic ambition, his chef d'oeuvre, was the printed book itself, with the original watercolors preliminary to it. Audubon did not conceive the drawings as independent works of art and he did not sell them: they served as models for the printer and colorists, and he displayed them in exhibitions to attract subscribers to the books. As beautiful as they are, the drawings were functional stepping stones on Audubon's winding path. The Birds of America is the product of total dedication over the course of a lifetime, and through countless vicissitudes. For much of his decades-long project there was a vast gulf between the scale of Audubon's ambition and the reality of his strained circumstances. "No life was at once more unusual and yet more representative of that expansive era when a national character emerged than Audubon's. Celebrate him for his wonderful birds, but recognize him as well as a characteristic American of the first generation – a man who literally made a name for himself" (Rhodes II, p.3). John James Audubon was born on April 26, 1785 on a sugar plantation in Haiti, the illegitimate son of Jean Audubon, a French naval officer and agent for a Nantes mercantile firm, and his mistress Jeanne Rabine, a twenty-seven-year-old chambermaid who died within months of giving birth. In 1791, sensing a slave revolution, Jean sent young Audubon and his half-sister (Jean's illegitimate daughter by another mistress) to Nantes to join him and his broad-minded wife Anne Moynet. The two were legally adopted in 1794, and Jean-Jacques Fougère Audubon (his full legal name at adoption) spent his early youth in and near Nantes where he received a basic education. Here, Audubon's lifelong preoccupation with birds found its earliest expression, collecting specimens during countless countryside rambles, later to be stuffed and drawn. In 1803, worried that his son might be conscripted into Napoleon's army, Jean sent John to America, ostensibly to help manage Mill Grove, a farm that he owned near Valley Forge, Pennsylvania. Here he was free to indulge his boyhood interest in drawing birds, and here too he met his future wife and unsung collaborator Lucy Bakewell, the daughter of a prosperous neighbor. Their courtship included observing Eastern Phoebes together, close to a cave on Perkiomen Creek. Wanting to know if a pair were returning to a previously abandoned nest, Audubon tied a silver thread to the leg of each – possibly the first recorded instance in America of bird-banding, now a routine technique to study bird migration. It was there, too, just months after they met, that Lucy told John that she returned his love. They married in 1808 and moved first to the new settlement of Louisville, and later to Henderson, Kentucky. Despite much enterprise and industry, John's businesses succumbed to the economic crisis that followed the British blockade during the War of 1812. In July of that same year, Audubon faced another devastating blow: Norway rats got into his box of drawings, shredded hundreds of leaves and lined their nests with the scraps; by Audubon's own account he lost close to a thousand specimens that he had drawn over the years. But 1812 is also the year that Audubon became a naturalized American citizen – the source of great pride for Audubon, as his personal seal and visiting card make evident: they feature a wild turkey and the motto "America my country". The largely unspoiled wilderness of Kentucky allowed Audubon access to a broader range of birds to hunt and draw. In 1810, Audubon briefly met the distinguished ornithologist Alexander Wilson at Louisville, where he saw the first two volumes of the artist-author's pioneering American Ornithology. Audubon was about to sign up for a subscription when his business partner stopped him: he cautioned him in French, with Wilson standing by, "what induces you to subscribe to this work? Your drawings are certainly far better". Audubon put down his pen; "vanity on the encomiums of my friend prevented me from subscribing" (quoted in Rhodes I, p. 67). The idea to publish first entered his mind on this occasion, but it was not until 1820, when he was declared bankrupt after the Panic of 1819, that Audubon decided to follow his passion and to gather material for a volume that would surpass Wilson. When his future looked the darkest, having lost everything except his drawings, Audubon "would prove to be phoenix-like, willing to reinvent himself after adversity – an American role model before that concept developed" (Olson, p.21). As he had remarked earlier "hopes are shy birds flying at great distance seldom reached by the best of guns" (Mississippi journal, December 8, 1810). Audubon set off for Louisiana, earning a precarious living as an itinerant artist and tutor. Lucy was left to support herself and their two sons until they eventually settled together at Bayou Sara, north of New Orleans, "a region of supernatural beauty with an abundance of birds" (Olson, p.25). Audubon's few predecessors had limited their studies to Eastern species; Audubon now extended the range of American natural history by recording the birds of the Mississippi flyway. It is while working in Louisiana and in Mississippi, after years of constantly refining his technique, that Audubon came into his full powers as a brilliant watercolorist and natural historian. "From this time on, the new draftsmanly precision of his work was matched by a new mastery of color, sensitivity to modeling, and skillful execution of realistic detail, a metamorphosis also shaped by his singular combination of media [...] Once established, his artistic vision remained unchanged throughout his production" (Shelley, p.116). In the spring of 1824, Audubon tried to find a publisher for his work in Philadelphia – the nation's intellectual and publishing epicenter at the time. In the City of Brotherly Love he met chiefly with closed doors and animosity. Audubon's work and his rustic persona antagonized supporters of Alexander Wilson, chief among them George Ord, who had completed the last two volumes of American Ornithology left unfinished at the time of Wilson's death. Ord developed a "pathological hatred of Audubon [and] was incensed by JJA's threat to his idol's preeminence"; he blocked his election to the Academy, maligned his scientific qualifications, and ensured that no engraver or publisher would work with him (Olson, p.27). To publish his great American masterpiece Audubon had to look abroad, although this was not his first choice. In July 1826 he landed in England, where he quickly found the support and appreciation that was so lacking back home. The new arrival's exotic demeanor – buckskin frontier pantaloons, and shoulder-length hair dressed with bear grease – resonated with locals: "The Last of the Mohicans had been published in London in April and was blooming to a nationwide fad, and some who met Audubon in Liverpool judged him a real life Natty Bumppo. The letters he carried introduced him to the first family of Liverpool shipping, the Rathbones, Quaker abolitionists who recognized his originality and sponsored him socially. Within a month, he was a celebrity, his presence sought at every wealthy table" (Rhodes II, p.7). Before long Audubon had met Walter Scott, John Murray, Thomas Lawrence, Humphry Davy, and could count a young Charles Darwin in the audience of one of his lectures (Audubon is quoted three times in On the Origin of Species). "The dramatic impact of his ambitious, complex pictures and a romantic image as 'the American woodsman' secured Audubon entry into a scientific community much preoccupied with little-known lands. He met the leaders of society and science and was elected to the leading organizations" (DSB). Before the American Civil War, Audubon was one of just a handful of Americans elected to the Royal Society of London, the leading scientific institution of its time – another was Benjamin Franklin. Audubon publicized his work in a series of exhibitions. At one of these, in Manchester, Audubon met F.S. Brookes, the American consul, who advised him to publish his "Great Work" by subscription, a traditional method of raising funds in advance of the great expenses demanded by such a publication. The public exhibitions became an important tool for signing up subscribers, and for generating start-up revenue through admission fees. Originally, The Birds of America was planned to be issued in eighty parts of five plates each, for a total of 400 plates. Eventually, the final count increased to 435 plates in 87 parts, as Audubon identified new species from western expeditions to various places including Texas and Oregon (Thomas Nuttall and John Kirk Townsend sent many specimens from the 1834 Wyeth expedition to the Columbia River). Capitalizing on his newfound status, and armed with his subscription model, Audubon travelled extensively to sign up subscribers in Britain, Europe, and America, among them the kings of England and France. In 1830, no longer a provincial curiosity, Audubon was received at the White House by President Andrew Jackson, and the House of Representatives subscribed to The Birds of America. That Audubon could complete his monumental project by subscription, with no institutional backing or noble benefactor, was "a staggering achievement, as if one man had single-handedly financed and built an Egyptian pyramid" (Rhodes II, p.8). The towering format of this work was dictated by Audubon's long-standing determination that each species be shown life-size, from the flamingo down to the hummingbird – even if the former had to curve its neck in an elegant arabesque. Along the way, Audubon was sometimes encouraged to scale down his drawings for print, but he never deviated. His commitment to verisimilitude was no mere gimmickry but grounded in a profound connection with the natural world inseparable from his work. "It was Audubon's unprecedented understanding of Nature that gave eternal colour to his wilderness palette and placed in his hands a brush with eternity" (Lank, p.19). This vision came with technical complications, not least because Audubon required a quality of engraving that few had the skill to deliver. In Edinburgh, the printer and zoologist, Patrick Neill, a fellow member of the Wernerian Society, directed Audubon to William Home Lizars (1788-1859), "the best engraver in the city," who was then working for two of Britain's foremost ornithologists: Prideaux John Selby (1788-1867) and William Jardine (1800-1874). Upon seeing Audubon's drawings, Lizars exclaimed "My God, I never saw anything like this before!" (quoted in Rhodes I, p. 271); he put aside Selby's commission and accepted Audubon's herculean challenge. The relationship with Lizars lasted for the first two parts (i.e. ten plates), after which a strike by Lizars' colorists caused Audubon to look for another engraver. The setback proved to be a blessing. In London Audubon met Robert Havell Jr, a "brilliant printmaker" with "an instinctive understanding of Audubon's aesthetic. Havell, a master of translation, would prove to be his ideal collaborator... The genius of Havell's burin and his sophisticated use of aquatint were unmatched" (Olson, p.30). Havell was a gifted artist in his own right, whose understanding of the artistry as well as the technology was of immense benefit to Audubon. Havell often improved Audubon's compositions; "fully a third of the plates contained some Havell elements not found in the original watercolours" (Lank, p.18). The quality of Havell's engravings mark "an unprecedented achievement in printmaking" (Olson, p.30). After Havell's first prints had come off the press, Audubon took a set to Lizars who "admired them much; called his workmen, and observed to them that the London artists beat them completely" (Audubon, quoted in Rhodes I, p.299). The Birds of America is considered "the most spectacular color folio print series ever produced [and] one of the world's preeminent natural history documents. Superbly conceived and executed, it eclipsed all others then and now, and is acknowledged to be the finest work of colored engraving with aquatint in existence" (Olson, p.30). The vivid originality and realism of Audubon's print masterpiece made an immediate impact on his contemporaries: with the first part just printed, Audubon visited Edinburgh's Royal Society – he laid the sheets down on the table and records: "the astonishment of everyone was great, and I saw with pleasure many eyes look from them to me" (quoted in Rhodes I, p.285). Thomas Bewick, whose own books were enormously popular with the public and influential among natural historians, "expressed himself as perfectly astounded at the boldness of my undertaking" (quoted in Rhodes I, p.287). Turning the pages of this book is as exhilarating today as it was then, but these contemporary reactions underscore the extent to which Audubon's work broke with tradition and introduced new insights. "In fact, animal art can be divided into two eras, before Audubon and after Audubon. Once he showed the way, there were many very competent artists [John Gould, Edward Lear, Joseph Wolf, etc.] who adopted his method of depicting more or less life-sized birds in lifelike poses, placed in some kind of setting. This artistic revolution ushered in the golden age of natural history illustration" (Lank, p.14). On a broader level, Audubon's work encouraged a shift away from the perception that the natural world is merely there to be quarried at man's whim – this is the reason that, since the 19th century, his name has been associated with one of the world's foremost conservation groups. "Along with his contemporary, Charles Darwin, Audubon changed forever the way in which we see the natural world" (Lank, p.10). References Fine Bird Books, p. 57; Fries, The Double Elephant Folio (Chicago 1973; rev. 2006, ed. Susanne Low); Lank, Audubon's Wilderness Palette (Toronto: 1998); Low, A Guide to Audubon's Birds of America (New Haven: 2002); McGill/Wood, p. 209; Nissen IVB 49; Olson, Audubon's Aviary (NY: 2012); Rhodes I: John James Audubon: The Making of An American (NY: 2004); Rhodes II: "John James Audubon: America's Rare Bird", www.smithsonianmag.com, 1 December 2004; Shelley, "Drawing Birds. Audubon's Artistic Practices", in Olson [see above]. For the Ornithological Biography see also: Ayer/Zimmer, pp. 18-20, 20-21; Copenhagen/Anker 17, 18; Ellis/Mengel 96; McGill/Wood, p. 207.

  • GBRGrande Bretagne
  • 2018-06-14
Prix ​​d'adjudication
Voir le prix

Invendu

PATEK PHILIPPE & Co., Geneva, Reference 989, Movement No. 844000

A yellow gold, double dialled and double open faced, minute repeating, grande and petite sonnerie clockwatch with Westminster chimes, split seconds chronograph, registers for 60-minutes and 12-hours, perpetual calendar, retrograde date, indications for century, leap year cycle, seasons, second time zone, date of Easter, astrological indications, moon phases, equation of time, dual power reserve for striking and going trains, mean and sidereal time, alarm, temperature, indications for times of sunrise/sunset and a celestial chart for the night time sky over Geneva, Switzerland at 46° 11 59 minutes north latitudeAccompanied by the original Patek Philippe fitted wood box with a plaque engraved, Calibre 89. Together with a Patek Philippe Portfolio with Extract from the Archives confirming the date of manufacture in 1989, with outer presentation slip case, gold corrector and gold key. IN THE COURSE OF PATEK PHILIPPES DISTINGUISHED HISTORY, THE FIRM HAS CREATED MANY EXTRAORDINARY WATCHES THAT HAVE CHALLENGED THE WAY WE THINK ABOUT TIMEPIECES.  AMONGST THE MANY COMPLICATED AND SIGNIFICANT TIMEPIECES EVER CREATED, THE CALIBRE 89 HAS REDEFINED THE FIELD OF HOROLOGY DUE TO THE INGENUITY OF ITS CREATORS.  IT IS AN HONOUR TO OFFER THE CALIBRE 89, THE MOST COMPLICATED WATCH OF THE 20TH CENTURY, AND PATEK PHILIPPES MOST COMPLICATED MASTERPIECE TO DATE.  Philippe Stern: A Declaration of Independence  Throughout its 178 years as a master watchmaking firm, Patek Philippe has created an abundance of extraordinary watches, challenging the way consumers think about timepieces. Among the most complicated and significant watches ever created, the Calibre 89 not only represents Patek Philippes unrivaled position at the apex of horology, but it also illustrates the firms unwavering belief in the superiority of the mechanical watch. Made at a time when the impact of the quartz crisis was still reverberating through the Swiss watch industry, the Calibre 89 is an affirmation of the unsurpassable genius of the watchmakers art. With 33 complications, the Calibre 89 remains Patek Philippes most complicated watch.  While the Swiss watch industry underwent profound advances and changes, Honorary President, (then Vice President and Managing Director) Philippe Stern, boldly faced the challenges of the modern world with a new manifesto. Under Stern, the company published a brochure titled A Declaration of Independence in 1974. Patek Philippe reaffirmed its integrity as a family-owned business and reassured its retail partners of its commitment to excellence in the face of the mass-produced and easily accessible quartz watch.  Sterns challenge was to push Patek Philippe into the modern world while retaining the venerable culture on which its success and reputation originated. The companys new approach to marketing and innovation redefined Patek Philippe in the final two decades of the twentieth century.  Changes in socioeconomic status and consumer culture paved the way for a new type of consumer with very high spending power but little knowledge of traditional and bespoke brands such as Patek Philippe.  Stern wisely targeted this deficit through an aggressive and cohesive marketing strategy.  Our marketing objective is to make Patek Philippe known as the best watch. We have to look after this new clientele and point out to them that Patek Philippe stands for original watchmaking that is above fashion and trends, and also something that is not an industrial product. (Philippe Stern in Nicholas Foulkes, Patek Philippe: The Authorized Biography, 2016, p. 338)  The Calibre 89 was devised during a discussion between Philippe Stern and Patek Philippes Technical Director, Max Studer. Under the new and dynamic marketing model of Stern, the team sought to find an appropriate and momentous way to celebrate their 150th Jubilee anniversary. Conceived ten years ahead of the anniversary, the initial idea of the watch was to reproduce the Henry Graves Jr. Supercomplication, which had then represented the absolute limit in horological possibility. Instead, Max Studer proposed the creation of an even more complex and complicated timepiece. Stern thus commissioned the making of the worlds most complicated watch to represent Patek Philippes unique and unmatched horological prowess. The Calibre 89 maintained the ateliers traditions and history, while the research and development required to complete it in turn helped keep Patek Philippe at the forefront of watchmaking. This open-faced astronomical and astrological watch with two dials comprises 1,728 components in total. Preliminary calculations and designs began in 1980, followed by five years of research and four years of production with the collaboration of a small group of Patek Philippe experts. The team included engineers Jean-Pierre Musy and François Devaud, watchmaker Paul Buclin and designer Frédérique Zesiger. With a working prototype ready in July 1988, the yellow gold Calibre 89 (movement No. 844000) was completed in April 1989.  The company then manufactured three additional pieces, one each in pink gold, white gold, and platinum, for which a further nine years were required to complete production.  The prototype currently resides in the permanent collection of the Patek Philippe Museum in Geneva, Switzerland. Innovations in Technology The discreet and acutely sensitive task of watchmaking had never before been mechanized by computer assisted technology. In fact, master watchmakers operated without the use of reference images or blueprints, relying solely from memory; an astounding feat. The development of the Calibre 89 was assisted firstly by Patek Philippes director, Alan Banbery, who was able to obtain photographic details of the Henry Graves Jr. Supercomplication for research, development, and inspiration. Secondly, the making of this watch introduced the unprecedented use of computer-aided design (CAD). Introduced and mechanized by automotive and architectural industries, CAD programs enhanced manual drafting with a swift automated process. The technology became integral in producing a higher level of precision components for the enormous movement. CAD-produced calculations guided tool-making mechanisms to create highly specialized parts to be cut without error at smaller scales than ever before. Headed by master draftsman and designer, Frédérique Zesiger, thousands of technical drawings and schematics were transferred to CAD. The program calculated various components such as the precise distance between indentations in the steel notched snail-cam in the repeating mechanism.  The team made several changes to the design of the Calibre 89 throughout the years, including the later addition of the tourbillon escapement and multi-functioning crown. As they made these adjustments, CAD simplified the process by generating new blueprints and components. CAD has advanced the field of horology and allowed makers to continually innovate and expand on masterpieces from the past. Surpassing the Supercomplication The Calibre 89 surpasses the Henry Graves Jr. Supercomplication with nine additional complications. Tourbillon: It was not until two and a half years into production that the makers decided to include a tourbillon escapement in the Calibre 89.  Alterations for the mechanism of the split-seconds chronograph were made in order to include the tourbillon in the final design. The tourbillon patented by Abraham Louis Breguet in 1801 compensates for the effects of gravity on the balance wheel.  By mounting the balance-wheel and escapement mechanism in a revolving cage, positional errors due to gravity are averaged out.  While the tourbillon regulator traditionally is part of the fourthwheel of the main drive train, due to the complexity of the Calibre 89, the fourth-wheel engages the toothed rim of the tourbillons cage.  The tourbillon also revolves once every two minutes, rather than the usual one revolution per minute. Sun Hand:  The gold hand capped by the sun on the Sidereal dial makes one rotation around the dial annually, and indicates the zodiac, seasons, the solstice and the equinox, located in the outer, middle and innermost ring respectively.  The mechanism for the sun hand also corresponds to the Equation of Time, the hours of sunrise and sunset and the Date of Easter. Date of Easter: All of the possible dates of Easter, which range from March 22nd to April 25th, appear in an arc on the sidereal dial.  Easter is the only Christian lunar holiday, thus it has a different date every year.  The cam in the Calibre 89 can accurately give the date of Easter for 29 years, starting in 1989.  After 2017, the cam needs to be replaced for the next 29 years.  When the watch records change of the year, a blue-steel hand shifts to point to the date of Easter for the indicated year.  A mechanism to indicate the date of Easter had never been done before, and Patek patented the design under patent number 649673 on December 13, 1985. Second Time Zone:  A gold hand on the mean solar time dial indicates the hours of a second time zone.  By pressing the push-piece at 11 oclock, the user can advance this independent hours hand in increments of one hour.  This allows the user to adjust this watch in different time-zones without advancing the minutes hand. Secular Calendar and Leap Year:  The Perpetual Calendar shows the correct day of the week, date of the month and month of the year regardless of the length of the month, it also adjusts for the leap year.  Since the duration of a Solar year is 365 days, 5 hours, 48 minutes and 46 seconds, an extra day is added every four years (leap year).  According to the Gregorian Calendar reforms of 1582, only century years that are divisible by 400 without remainder are considered leap years.  Unlike the Graves, the Calibre 89 compensates for this, thus it will not count the years 2100, 2200 and 2300 as leap years. The aperture immediately to the right of the year indication displays the leap year cycle from 1-4.. Year Indication: The year indication appears in an aperture right under the winding-crown-position indicator.  A metal disk has the numerals for centuries up to the 27th century. Mechanism to halt chime: Two mainspring barrels in the first tier of the movement power the chime and the alarm.  The chime consists of four gongs, and is regulated by a centrifugal governor.  When the repeater is in use, it can run down the mainspring in the barrel that powers the chime.  If the watch is set to chime in passing, a blocking mechanism stops the Grand Strike or Small Strike before the mainspring of the chimes completely runs down. Winding-Crown position indicator: The Winding Crown position indicator is also unique to the Calibre 89.  Placed towards the top of the mean solar time dial, it indicates the different positions at which the winding crown must be at in order to set specific functions of the watch.  Position R to wind the movement and the chime, Position A to set astronomical calendar and the alarm, Position B to set sidereal time and mean solar time. The Mean Time Dial Cream dial, applied yellow gold Breguet numerals, outer track for minutes with red five minute divisions, double-sunk subsidiary dials for 30-minute and 12-hour registers combined with power reserve indications for going and striking trains respectively, further double-sunk subsidiary dial for constant seconds and temperature combined with moon-phases, retrograde date, apertures for day, month, year, and leap year indication, crown position indicator, yellow gold Breguet hour and minute hands, blued steel Breguet hand for second time zone, blued steel split second hands, blued steel triangular alarm indicator, hands for temperature and power reserve indications, blued steel hands for subsidiary seconds and chronograph minute/hour registers 1. Winding-Crown-Position Indicator 2. Century Decade and Year 3. Leap Year Indication 4. Split Seconds 5. Seconds in Meantime 6. Power Reserve for Movement 7. 30-Minute Register 8. Month 9. Second Time Zone 10. Constant Seconds 11. Moon-Phases 12. Temperature °C 13. Day 14. Power Reserve for Chime 15. Alarm 16. Hours in Meantime 17. 12-Hour Register 18. Date The Sidereal Dial White dial, painted gold Arabic numerals calibrated for 24 hours, inner minute track, subsidiary dials for sunrise, sunset and sidereal seconds combined with the equation of time, outermost ring for seasons, solstice and equinox indications, zodiac, and months, blued steel feuille hands for hours and minutes, blued steel hand for indicating date of Easter, yellow gold sun-tipped hand indicating to outer rings, blued steel hands for sunrise/sunset and subsidiary seconds, gold hand for equation of time, large aperture revealing the celestial chart surrounded with the cardinal points, the celestial disc composed of corundum sapphire crystal marked with 2,800 distinct gilt stars in five sizes according to their orders of magnitude, on the reverse side of the transparent disc with applied fine gold dust representing the Milky Way, the whole night sky for the horizon at the latitude of Geneva, Switzerland, 46 ° 11 59 North 1. Month 2. Signs of the Zodiac 3. Seasons 4. Minutes in Sidereal time 5. Celestial Chart over Geneva, Switzerland 6. Time of Sunset 7. Constant Seconds in Sidereal Time 8. Solstice 9. Sun Hand 10. Equation of Time 11. Time of Sunrise 12. Equinox 13. Hours in Sidereal Time 14. Date of Easter The movement of the Calibre 89 is composed of four separate tiers on three plates. The plates are made of the alloy maillechort, more commonly referred to as German silver. Within the movement are three mainspring barrels, powering the main functions of the watch and calendar, the alarm, and the repeat function respectively. The multi-tiered construction not only allows the watch to convey all the information of its 33 complications to the dial, but also allows the configuration of the dials to retain symmetry and attractive proportions.  The Movement Tier 1 Containing the chime, alarm, power reserve for the movement and repeater, and 12-hour register.  Tier 2 Containing the mean-time, tourbillon, chronograph function and 30-minute register.  Tier 3 Containing the functions of the sidereal dial including the sidereal time, star chart, seasons, solstices and equinoxes, Zodiac calendar, equation of time, sunrise and sunset.  Tier 4 Containing the functions of the perpetual calendar including the month, day and date, moon phases, second time zone, and the one non-horological function, the thermometer. The Case The classic bassine case of the Calibre 89 was made in house by Patek Philippe. It is cut from three pieces of 18 carat yellow gold, and consists of a central case band that supports the plates of the movement, the band fitted with a slide at the crown, engraved CL (Cadran Légal) and CS (Cadran sidéral), slide for strike/ silent engraved S/O, for slide for petite sonnerie and grande sonnerie engraved GS/PS, repeat slide at 6 oclock, one large slide for winding of the alarm, with two bezels on which the crystals are installed to protect the dials. Two corundum sapphire crystals are fitted atop each dial which is scratch resistant against virtually every common material, except diamond. The case boasts a massive diameter of 88.2 mm, 41.07 mm total thickness including the crystals, and, including the movement, weighs a total of 1,100 grams (2 lb, 43 oz). The case itself weighs an impressive 500 grams, twice the weight of the Henry Graves Supercomplication. With such an enormous number of complications co-existing within one finely tuned case, even the simplest of functions and configurations were put to the test and met with challenges. The winding-crown-position indicator is a simple function where a needle points to one of the three positions to which the winding-crown is set to perform certain tasks. However, as the complication was developed and ordered after the entire watch had been designed, fitting this otherwise simple function was nearly impossible without the perfecting eye of Patek Philippes, Jean-Pierre Musy and Paul Buclin.

  • CHESuisse
  • 2017-05-14
Prix ​​d'adjudication
Voir le prix

The duc d’orléans breguet sympathiquebreguet, nos.128 and 5009, dated

THE DUC D’ORLÉANS BREGUET SYMPATHIQUE BREGUET, NOS.128 AND 5009, DATED 1835 A UNIQUE AND HIGHLY IMPORTANT ORMOLU-MOUNTED RED TORTOISESHELL BOULLE-STYLE, ROYAL SYMPATHIQUE QUARTER STRIKING CLOCK AND HALF-QUARTER REPEATING GOLD WATCH AUTOMATICALLY WOUND, SET AND REGULATED VIA THE CLOCK No other horological invention has been as consistently associated with the palaces and grand houses of the European Royalty and aristocracy as the Breguet Sympathique. The present example, named “the Duc d’Orléans” after its patron, has the most complex Sympathique mechanism of all the known examples. The complexity of the mechanism is only rivalled by the clock’s sumptuous case. The d’Orléans is the only Sympathique known to wind, set to time and regulate its watch via the integrated cradle mounted on the clock’s pediment. Originally commissioned by the Duc d’Orléans for his Parisian home the Pavillon de Marsan, nearly a century later the clock found its way into one of the world’s most important horological museums, the Time Museum of Rockford, Illinois. The clock remained on display at the museum until 1999 when it was sold to a private collector at the ground-breaking Sotheby’s auction “Masterpieces from the Time Museum.” Following its sale at auction, the clock was displayed at the Patek Philippe Museum, from 2001 until 2005. The Duc d’Orléans Sympathique exemplifies Breguet’s genius and demonstrates what can be achieved when the vision of patron, designer, artisan, and horologist seamlessly fuse with one another to create a true work of art. Breguet’s horological genius and the Duc d’Orléans’ remarkable eye resulted in the clock’s creation, expressed through his talented designer, Charles Auguste Questel (1807-1888), bronzier, Guillaume Denière, and ébéntiste, Louis Alexandre Bellangé. The Clock Five-inch dial with enamel chapters and outer silver rings, signed Breguet MDCC-CXXXV, two train square plated movement signed Breguet No. 128, with eight-day Graham-type deadbeat escapement, the escape wheel teeth pierced for oil retention, jeweled pallets and beat adjustment on the crutch, quarter striking on two bells with cadrature mounted on the backplate, a tandem wheel on the striking barrel drives a separate train for winding the watch, the gridiron pendulum with gilt lenticular bob insert with an inlaid silver center, the Sympathique mechanism with three control wires rising above to the watch holder, the richly decorated case veneered overall with red tortoiseshell inlaid with gilt-brass and pewter scrolls, strap work and cornucopia, the watch holder set on the “tiled” cresting above lion masks holding a garland of fruit, the angled corners with studious winged putti finials above a satyr mask and shell frieze, the angled corners with Corinthian-capped pilasters inhabited by musical putti, the slightly out-swept base with decorated moldings and raised on gadrooned feet, the sides and back inlaid with the Duc d’Orléans’ cypher surmounted by a crown, the glazed front door bordered with ormolu roundels depicting the signs of the Zodiac. height 23 in (59.1 cm) The Watch No. 5009, with silvered dial signed Breguet, finely engraved foliate center with sectors for state of wind and regulation, the movement with lever escapement, half-quarter repeating on a single gong, two-armed compensation balance with parachute suspension and spiral steel spring with terminal curve, the gold engine-turned case with concealed winding and setting in the band, with a gilt roundel applied with the Duc’s cypher to occupy the vacant watch aperture during the day, gold Breguet ratchet key for the watch. diameter 2.24 in (57.1 mm) The Breguet Certificate Accompanied by a facsimile of Breguet certificate no. 4182 dated September 13, 1999, and Breguet certificate no. 4383 dated October 24, 2012, recording the sale on July 16th, 1836 to “Son Altesse Royale le Duc d’Orléans le No. 128 ‘Pendule Sympathique à quantieme de mois remontant et remettant la montre à l’heure quelque distance que celle-ci soit de la pendule; blanc commencement d’ouvrage: Winnerl; blanc finissage cadratures mécanise de remontoire, roué de quantieme; Charles Couëte, echappement et ouvrage: D. Lebrun.’ Avec le No. 5009 chronomètre d’or, repetition au demi-quarts, cadran argent avec indicateurs de reserve de marche et d’avance-retard; echappement à ancre, balancier compensateur. Pour le prix de 10,000 Fr.” The Patron Ferdinand-Philippe, Duc d’Orléans (1810-1842) Ferdinand-Philippe, Duc d’Orléans was born in Palermo in 1810. The eldest son of Louis Philippe and Marie Amélie, Princess of the Two Sicilies, Ferdinand-Philippe assumed the title of Duc d’Orléans in 1830 when his father became King of France. In 1837, he married Hélène Louis Elisabeth of Mecklenburg-Schwerin (1814-1858) with whom he had two sons, the Comte de Paris and the Duc de Chârtres. The Duc d’Orléans was well-educated, with a distinguished military career and a clear passion for the arts. He regularly spent more than one-tenth of his annual one million franc income on art and cultural patronage. He had broad collecting interests, which ranged from medieval works of art to Chinese porcelain and furniture. Each piece in his collection was of the highest quality. He was passionate about contemporary painting, favoring the Barbizon school in particular. His collection boasted landscapes by Camille Corot and Theodore Rousseau, as well as paintings by Eugène Delacroix. In addition, the Duc commissioned Jean-Auguste-Dominique Ingres to paint the work, Antiochus and Stratonice and his own portrait in 1840. In 1832, the Duc d’Orléans began to redecorate his Parisian apartments at the Pavillon de Marsan surrounding the Louvre. Ferdinand-Philippe’s financial wealth was such that he was able to employ the finest architects and craftsmen. The Duc was a young man of 22 when he appointed his contemporary Charles-Auguste Questel (1807-1888) as architect for his apartments. Questel demonstrated precocious talent, and the Duc was eager to patronize his artistic efforts. Questel went on to design the extraordinary case of the present lot while still in his twenties. Ferdinand-Philippe, the Duc d’Orléans died in a tragic carriage accident in 1842 at the young age of 32 whilst on his way to a military review in the countryside. Historians often consider Ferdinand-Philippe to have been the glue that held the July Monarchy together. His father, Louis-Philippe, was so distraught by the sudden loss that the event may have been a significant factor in the fall of the monarchy in 1848. The Commission In commissioning his Sympathique, the Duc d’Orléans sought to combine the latest horological technologies with a decorative design that would befit the sumptuous aesthetic of his royal apartments in the Pavillon de Marsan. Unsurprisingly, the Duc was no stranger to the House of Breguet. The d’Orléans family had been faithful patrons of Breguet since the horologist’s beginnings in 1775. Ferdinand-Philippe’s grandfather, Louis Philippe II, purchased one of Breguet’s first self-winding watches called the perpetuelle in 1780. Breguet had long been established as the preferred watch and clock maker for the French Royal family, including Marie Antoinette, as well as many other European monarchs and nobility. Therefore, it was fitting for Ferdinand-Philippe to continue his family tradition by commissioning Breguet to make the technologically advanced Sympathique. It was essential that the design of the clock case complement the interior of the newly-decorated apartment at the Pavillon de Marsan. As Anne Dion Tennenbaum, Chief Curator of the Department of Decorative Arts at the Louvre in Paris, notes, Questel was the ideal candidate for the clock case’s design. Questel hired bronzier, Guillaume Denière and ébéniste, Louis-Alexandre Bellangé to complete the execution of the case. According to Anne Dion Tennenbaum, it appears that the clock was later chosen by Dernière to be exhibited at the 1839 Exposition des Produits de l’Industrie in Paris. The Innovation of the Sympathique During the French Revolution, Abraham-Louis Breguet returned from exile to Switzerland where he conceived the ingenious idea of the Sympathique.  The Sympathique was primarily designed to demonstrate Breguet’s craftsmanship and capabilities, and to further enhance his reputation as the most distinguished and innovative horologist of his time. In a letter to his son dated June 26th, 1795, he wrote: “I have great pleasure my friend, in telling you that I have made a very important invention, but about which you must be very discreet, even about the idea. I have invented a means of setting a watch to time, and regulating it, without anyone having to do it… Then every night on going to bed, you put the watch into the clock. In the morning, or one hour later, it will be exactly to time with the clock. It is not even necessary to open the watch.  I expect from this, the greatest promotion of our fame and fortune.” Three types of Sympathiques were manufactured over the following twenty-five years.  The earliest known Sympathique was made in 1812 by Louis Rabi, one of Breguet’s most adept pupils, and featured the rewinding mechanism. However, the majority of the clocks are dated after Breguet’s death in 1823. Due to the exorbitant cost of these masterpieces, many were sold to European Royalty.  The Sympathique Mechanism  In The Art of Breguet (p. 90), Dr. George Daniels writes of the Duc d’Orléans Sympathique: “The technical development of the mechanism of this example is… remarkably advanced… and may be regarded as the complete mechanical solution to Breguet’s self-imposed problem of maintaining a watch without touching it… To have the watch set and wound it is necessary only to put it in the cradle and at three o’clock in the morning [the watch] will be set and… fully wound.”  The complexity of the Sympathique mechanism was such that construction could take up to 20 years to complete. Although the Duc d’Orléans Sympathique is numbered as part of a series that began ten years after Abraham Louis Breguet’s death in 1823, the watch itself belongs to a series that began in 1794. And though the sale of the d’Orléans Sympathique was in 1836, thirteen years after Breguet’s death, it is likely that Breguet was the mastermind behind its conception due to the amount of time it took to complete his most complicated pieces. Indeed, the present lot has all the characteristics of Breguet’s horological philosophy. Dr. Daniels wonderfully sums up the Sympathique thus: “The Sympathique is an ingenious and amusing toy such as only Breguet could conceive. Certainly no one but Breguet could have produced them, for they need the most skillful workmen to make them and the financial burden would have been considerable. They can hardly be described as useful or necessary, but great artists are not always motivated by such considerations. Sometimes fine work is done just for its own sake, or because it contains a challenge undertaken and overcome, or perhaps simply because it is amusing and demonstrates a remarkable talent in full flight of fancy. The Sympathique is a jewel of misplaced ingenuity in a forest of scientific horological endeavors and their very existence is sufficient reason for their manufacture for they never cease to amaze and mystify… The mechanism is thoroughly ingenious and fascinating to watch in action.  It can hardly be justified on practical grounds, for a watch with lever escapement and compensation balance will run accurately and not need regulating and setting each day… Such considerations however, were of little consequence to Breguet who simply wished to demonstrate his extraordinary ability as the supreme mechanic.” Excerpted and reprinted with the kind permission of Daniels London Ltd., from The Art of Breguet, London, 1974, pp. 91. Dr. Daniels was especially mesmerized by the action of the d’Orléans time-setting mechanism, noting on page 91 of his book that “the [watch’s] hand setting mechanism is fascinating to watch and quite startling to the uninitiated for… [at the allotted hour, if necessary] the hands will cross paths as the hour hand turns forward to three and the minute hand turns backwards to twelve.” For a full description, including Dr. Daniels’ technical drawings explaining the function and action of the Sympathique mechanism, see The Art of Breguet, pp. 356-360. Dr. George Daniels, MBE, CBE and the Breguet Sympathique no. 128 The celebrated horologist, master watchmaker, and Breguet scholar, Dr. George Daniels (1925-2011), was responsible for bringing the present lot, Sympathique no. 128, and its companion watch no. 5009, back to life. Seth G. Atwood (1917- 2010), the American collector and founder of the Time Museum in Rockford, Illinois, enlisted Dr. Daniels in 1974 to help him find one of the rare Sympathiques for his museum. Dr. Daniels and Mr. Atwood first met in 1974. Atwood, already a well-known horological collector, was on a mission to expand the Time Museum’s collection. He and Will Andrewes, the museum’s curator at the time, drew up a list of “must have pieces.” In the Sotheby’s New York auction, the “Fine Watches from the Atwood Collection”, December 11th, 1986 catalogue, Dr. Daniels wrote of Mr. Atwood: “His method was to approach every known and established horologist whatever their specialty and describe the pieces he wanted in order to build a complete picture of the development of the timekeeper… Nothing but the best would do and everything contributory, especially unique and extremely rare pieces, were sought.”  The Time Museum was considered the most important horological collection in the world until it closed in March 1999. Its contents were sold by Sotheby’s between 1999 and 2004. The initial sale on December 2nd, 1999 included the Sympathique no. 128. Locating a Breguet Sympathique was not an easy feat, given that all known examples were already held by institutions. Dr. Daniels wrote in his autobiography All in Good Time (2006): "I had located the piece in Paris through a French Antique dealer in 1974. The whole self -winding mechanism was missing, probably because, as so often happens with complex mechanisms, a repairer couldn’t reassemble it properly. But only a half dozen or so Sympathiques were ever made, so Atwood was pleased to be able to purchase it. My task was to replace the whole of the mechanism while filling all vacant holes and without making any new ones. At that time, I was filled with a passionate love for Breguet’s work and was at the peak of my understanding of his philosophy. The work presented no difficulty and was tremendously enjoyable." The restoration performed on the Sympathique is historic given that Dr. Daniels, considered the ‘modern day Breguet’ by virtue of his horological genius, had carried out the work. It is also significant that Dr. Daniels carried out the work for horological patron, Seth Atwood, who was instrumental in the early development of Dr. Daniels’ crowning achievement, the invention of the Co-Axial Escapement. Dr. Daniels published The Art of Breguet in 1975. The monograph on Breguet’s work was the result of a cumulative 15 years of study, thousands of miles traveled with camera and tripod, numerous collectors met, and hundreds of Breguet watches examined and photographed. In the preface, Dr. Daniels describes the role that restoring Breguet watches and clocks played in his own development as a horologist. He writes, “I began to specialize in the restoration of Breguet’s work with a view of making a detailed study.” Indeed, Dr. Daniels’ mastery of the most complicated technical elements is made evident in his thorough and academic description and illustrations of the d’Orléans Sympathique. Dr. Daniels’ interest in Breguet began in earnest following his restoration of a complicated Breguet pocket watch for his mentor and friend, Cecil Clutton, with whom he co-authored his first book in 1965 titled, Watches. In 1964, Daniels accompanied Clutton to Paris to research the newly restored watch in the Breguet record books. Dr. Daniels was then introduced to George Brown, then the owner of the Breguet firm. Mr. Brown and Dr. Daniels forged a lasting friendship, which provided Dr. Daniels with unparalleled access to the extensive Breguet archives. Dr. Daniels wrote in his book that “this information was important to [his] personal Breguet records in that it helped to give perspective to Breguet’s system of manufacture.” In 1967, Mr. Brown conferred upon Dr. Daniels the title of Agent de Breguet à Paris for London, a significant posting that had been vacant in London since 1920. Amongst Dr. Daniels’ earliest works were two replicas of Breguet’s Three Wheel Skeleton clock. Brown, excited by the quality of Dr. Daniel’s work, insisted that the two pieces be entered into the record books of Breguet, assigned a Breguet number and given Breguet certificates. Dr. Daniels retained one of the two Three Wheel Skeleton clocks until his passing in 2011. The clock was eventually sold in the Sotheby’s London sale of the “George Daniels Horological Collection”, November 6th, 2012, lot 3. Known Sympathiques Approximately 12 Sympathiques are known at this time. Of the existing Sympathique clocks, three were made for the Spanish Crown; four were made for the Russian Crown; one was commissioned by Napoleon as a state gift for the Turkish Sultan, Mahmut II; and one was made for the British King George IV at the time of his Regency. Of the entire group, eight are retained by national museums. Only four have been offered at public auction, one of which is now in the Beyer Clock and Watch Museum in Zurich. The others, including the present lot, were purchased by private collectors. Of the known clocks, few have remained in their original state and some no longer possess their original watches. In researching his 1982 article in Alte Uhren, Helmut Mann accounted for ten clocks, and published their dates of manufacture and buyers. (Mann, H. “Breguet Pendule Sympathique”, Alte Uhren, July 3rd, 1982, pp. 177-184). Following the publication of this article, an additional two Sympathique clocks were discovered. The first was clock no. 257, made for Francis Barring, currently in a private collection. The second was clock no. 421, made for Joseph Bonaparte, King of Spain, for 6,000 Francs and constructed between 1795 and 1808. However, it is not confirmed that clock no. 421 was sold with a watch, despite the fact that one was recorded in Breguet’s books. It was sold in 1994 and is now in the collection of the Beyer Museum, Zurich. The final Sympathique clock, No. 222, was made for Grand Duke Constantine Nicholaievich (missing its original watch), was sold at Sotheby’s, Geneva, November 18, 1997, lot 257.

  • USAUSA
  • 2012-12-04
Prix ​​d'adjudication
Voir le prix

Patek, Philippe, Genève. The white gold "Calibre 89", the most complicated watch in the world with a total of 33 complications

Patek, Philippe, Genève. The white gold "Calibre 89", the most complicated watch in the world with a total of 33 complications. A spectacular and unique, keyless three-barrel, double dial, astronomical and astrological 18K white gold watch with sidereal time, second time-zone, time of sun-rise and sun-set, equation of time, perpetual calendar, century leap year correction, century, decade and year indication, four year cycle indication, season, equinox, solstice and zodiac indication, star chart, phases and age of the moon, date of Easter indication, split-seconds chronograph, hour and minute recorders, Westminster chime on four gongs, “Grande and Petite sonnerie”, alarm, up/down indicators for the going and striking train, three way setting indicator, winding crown position indicator, thermometer and Tourbillon regulator. Accompanied by an Extract from the Archives and a fitted hardwood box. C. four-body, "bassine", polished. D. Front: cream with applied white gold Breguet numerals,retrograde date sector, hour and minute recording dials combined with the power reserve sectors for the going and striking trains, moon phase, year, month, day and four uear cycle apertures, second time-zone, thermometer, winding-crown position indicator, alarm indicator, outer 1/5th seconds scale with five minute/seconds red Arabic markers and subsidiary constant seconds. Blued steel and white gold hands. Back: Silvered with hours of sidereal time, date of Easter sector, sun-rise and sun-set dials, subsidiary sidereal seconds, equaeion of time sector, sun hand and aperture for the star chart. Blued steel and white gold hands. M. Cal. 89, three-barrels on four levels, maillechort, 600grams, "fausses côtes" decoration, 126 jewels, 1728 parts straight-line lever escapement, Gyromax balance, blued-steel Breguet balance spring, adjusted to heat, cold, isochronism and five positions, tourbillion regulator.,Dial side main plate: mechanisms for the chime, alarm, 12-hour recorder and the power reserve indicators, the. Reverse main plate, mechanisms for mean time, the chronograph, the 30-minute recorder and the tourbillon regulator. Plate 2: mechanisms for sidereal time, the season, solstices, equinoxes and solstice, the times of sunrise and set, the equation of time, the date of easter and the star chart. Plate 3: the mechanisms for the secular perpetual calendar, the second time-zone, the phases and age of the moon and the thermometer. Dial, case and movement signed. Diam. 88.2mm, 41.07mm thick (with the crystals), total weight 1100 grams.

  • CHESuisse
  • 2004-04-24
Prix ​​d'adjudication
Voir le prix
Annonce

Assembled by a dedicated Swatch collector over the years, this is

All the watches are in unworn pristine condition, please note that the functionality and time keeping accuracy of the watches have not been tested. This collection represents the dedication and passion of the owner Paul Dunkel spreading across 25 years. He acquired the watches via various means including exchange forums, auctions and retail outlets globally. The acrylic presentation stands that accompany the watches are the efforts of a professional Swatch expert shop to better preserve the watches and illustrate the spirit of Swatch. To our specialist's opinion, some of the watches, particularly the prototypes of the collection, are likely configured versions of the factory version, which are presumably experimental ventures at the time.We would like to offer this Swatch collection as not merely a watch or art collection, but a holistic experience that captures the essence of the Swatch brand. "In response to your inquiry, we are pleased to provide you with a general report of the condition of the property described above. All dimensions in catalogue descriptions are approximate. Condition reports may not specify mechanical replacements or imperfections to the movement, case, dial, pendulum, separate base(s) or dome. Watches in water-resistant cases have been opened to examine movements but no warranties are made that the watches are currently water-resistant. Please note that we do not guarantee the authenticity of any individual component parts, such as wheels, hands, crowns, crystals, screws, bracelets and leather bands, since subsequent repairs and restoration work may have resulted in the replacement of original parts. Since we are not professional conservators or restorers, we urge you to consult with a restorer or conservator of your choice who will be better able to provide a detailed, professional report. Prospective buyers should inspect each lot to satisfy themselves as to condition and must understand that any statement made by Sotheby's is merely a subjective, qualified opinion. Prospective buyers should also refer to any Important Notices regarding this sale, which are printed in the Sale Catalogue. In particular, please note it is the purchaser's responsibility to comply with any applicable import and export matters, particularly in relation to lots incorporating materials from endangered species.NOTWITHSTANDING THIS REPORT OR ANY DISCUSSIONS CONCERNING A LOT, ALL LOTS ARE OFFERED AND SOLD AS IS" IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE CONDITIONS OF BUSINESS PRINTED IN THE SALE CATALOGUE." **Please be advised that bands made of materials derived from endangered or otherwise protected species (i.e. alligator and crocodile) are not sold with the watches and are for display purposes only. We reserve the right to remove these bands prior to shipping. Important Notice regarding importation into the United States of Rolex watches Sotheby's cannot arrange for the delivery of Rolex watches to the United States because U.S. laws restricts the import of Rolex watches. The buyer or a designated agent may collect the property in the country of sale."

  • HKGHong Kong
  • 2015-04-07
Prix ​​d'adjudication
Voir le prix

Patek philippe

PATEK PHILIPPE REFERENCE 5208T-010 REFERENCE 5208T-010 WAS CREATED SPECIALLY FOR ONLY WATCH 2017. IT STANDS OUT AS THE FIRST AND ONLY VERSION OF THIS TIMEPIECE EVER PRODUCED IN TITANIUM, A METAL RARELY USED FOR A PATEK PHILIPPE. Model name / Reference: 5208T-010 Case: Titanium Interchangeable full back and sapphire-crystal case back. Case is humidity and dust protected only (not water resistant) Dial: Blue dial with a hand-guilloché “carbon” pattern, gold applied indexes with luminescent coating 18K gold dial plate.- 60-minute and 12-hour counters Central chronograph hand Day, date, month, leap year and day/night indication inapertures Moon phases Seconds subdial Calibre: Caliber R CH 27 PS QI. Self-winding mechanical movement with distinctive and unique black-rhodium plated finish equipped with a micro-rotor decorated with an exclusive hand-guilloched carbon fiber pattern. Minute repeater. Chronograph, instantaneous perpetual calendar with day/night indication Bracelet: Blue Cordura strap with fold-over clasp Dimensions: Diameter: 42mm - Thickness: 15.11mm Specificities: Reference 5208T-010 was created specially for Only Watch 2017. It stands out as the first and only version of this timepiece ever produced in titanium, a metal rarely used for a Patek Philippe. This unique piece features a blue dial adorned with a hand-guilloched carbon-fiber pattern, underlining the manufacture’s role as protector of the rare handcrafts. The caliber R CH 27 PS QI movement, visible through a sapphire-crystal display back, also presents a distinctive finish with the entire movement being black rhodium-plated. The platinum micro-rotor is hand-guilloché with the same decoration as the dial. A blue Cordura strap echoes the dial color.

  • GBRGrande Bretagne
  • 2017-11-11
Prix ​​d'adjudication
Voir le prix
Annonce

A historically important and exceedingly attractive white gold...

Rolex Case, dial, movement and bracelet signed When this watch made its public debut in 2013 via Hodinkee, a well-known online watch magazine, the news of a white gold vintage Daytona sent reverberations throughout the watch community. Here was a timepiece so precious, that its very existence baffled the most seasoned of collectors. So elusive that only a handful of the horological cognoscenti had seen it in the flesh. Having presided in John Goldberger’s world-class collection for many years, this singular white gold reference 6265 appears at public auction for the very first time.The “Black Swan Theory” hypothesizes that every unpredictable and major event can be explained in hindsight. This timepiece’s appearance at auction proves this theory. For the longest time, Goldberger has asserted that this Cosmograph would never be for sale. Quite simply it could not be replaced. However, realizing the impact its sale could have on others, he was willing to reconsider. He has therefore decided to sell this watch to benefit Children Action, a foundation dedicated to helping the lives of youth around the world.For many years it was commonly accepted that Rolex only produced manual winding Cosmographs in stainless steel or yellow gold, and never in platinum, white or pink gold. While a bi-metal Cosmograph was discovered last year and sold at Phillips in October 2017, it was unfathomable to many that Rolex would ever deviate from its modus operandi.Yet for one lucky customer, Rolex created a one-off unique masterpiece – a Cosmograph cased in white precious metal. Research shows that this watch was manufactured in 1970 and delivered in 1971, made upon special order for a German retailer. At the time of production, it was very likely the rarest, most luxurious and special Cosmograph available on the market. Some 45 years later, this claim still rings true today.This chronograph is without doubt Rolex’s magnum opus. Bearing reference number 6265, its groundbreaking rediscovery some ten years ago is now an indelible part of the Cosmograph Daytona’s history. It is our understanding that this watch was internally assigned with the reference number 6265/9. While Rolex historically and traditionally assigned the number 8 for yellow gold watches, 9 was used for timepieces cased in white gold. Rolex product literature confirms this, as yellow Cosmographs were listed with the reference number 6265/8.While originally found with a leather strap, Goldberger has fitted this timepiece with a luxuriously heavy white gold bracelet to enhance its visual appeal. This watch features a black “sigma” dial, which is correct for the manufacture date. The contrasting black background and silver graphics is visually spectacular. Subtly unassuming, the case has beautiful luminosity, glowing in a way that only white gold can. Featuring bold proportions and stamped with a crisp 18K mark and hallmark, it is like nothing the market has ever seen before.Its importance and rarity cannot be overstated. A dream come true for many, it presents a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity for collectors to acquire the one and only manual-winding white gold Rolex chronograph. Sold to benefit Children Action, it is the first and most likely only time the white gold reference 6265/9 will ever appear in the public sphere in our lifetime.

  • CHESuisse
  • 2018-05-12
Prix ​​d'adjudication
Voir le prix

The Yellow Gold Calibre 89 Patek Philippe - Genève A spectacular and unique, keyless three-barrel, double dial, astronomical and astrological 18K yell

The Yellow Gold Calibre 89 Patek Philippe - Genève A spectacular and unique, keyless three-barrel, double dial, astronomical and astrological 18K yellow gold watch with sidereal time, second time zone, time of sunrise and sunset, equation of time, perpetual calendar, century leap year correction, century, decade and year indication, four year cycle indication, season, equinox, solstice and Zodiac indication, star chart, phases and age of the moon, date of Easter indication, split-seconds chronograph, hour and minute recorders, Westminster chime on four gongs, “Grande and Petite Sonnerie”, alarm, up/down indicators for the going and striking train, three way setting indicator, winding crown position indicator, thermometer and Tourbillon regulator. Accompanied by the Extract from the Archives and a fitted hardwood box. C. Four-body, "bassine", polished. D. Front: cream with applied yellow gold Breguet numerals, retrograde date sector, hour and minute recording dials combined with the power reserve sectors for the going and striking trains, moon phase, year, month, day and four-year cycle apertures, second time zone, thermometer, winding crown position indicator, alarm indicator, outer 1/5th seconds scale with five minute/seconds red Arabic markers and subsidiary constant seconds. Blued steel and yellow gold hands. Back: Silvered with hours of sidereal time, date of Easter sector, sun-rise and sun-set dials, subsidiary sidereal seconds, equation of time sector, sun hand and aperture for the star chart. Blued steel and yellow gold hands. M. Cal. 89, three barrels on four levels, maillechort, 600 grams, fausses cotes decoration, 126 jewels, 1728 parts, straight-line lever escapement, Gyromax balance, blued-steel Breguet balance spring, adjusted to heat, cold, isochronism and five positions, tourbillion regulator. Dial side main plate: mechanisms for the chime, alarm, 12-hour recorder and the power reserve indicators for the chime and movement. Reverse main plate, mechanisms for mean time, the chronograph, the 30-minute recorder and the tourbillon regulator. Plate 2: Mechanisms for sidereal time, the season, solstices, equinoxes and solstice, the times of sunrise and sunset, the equation of time, the date of Easter and the star chart. Plate 3: The mechanisms for the secular perpetual calendar, the second time zone, the phases and age of the moon and the thermometer. Dial, case and movement signed. Diam. 88.2 mm, 41.07 mm thick (with the crystals), total weight 1100 grams.

  • CHESuisse
  • 2009-11-14
Prix ​​d'adjudication
Voir le prix

Breguet & Fils, Paris, No. 2667 "Montre plate à deux mouvements, sur le principe des chronomètres". An extremely rare and exceptionally fine and elega

Breguet & Fils, Paris, No. 2667 "Montre plate à deux mouvements, sur le principe des chronomètres". An extremely rare and exceptionally fine and elegant 18K gold precision watch with two movements Signed Breguet et Fils, No. 2667, sold in August 1814 to Mr Garcias of London for the sum of 5,000 francs 26'''gilded brass movement with two complete mechanisms contained within the area of a single plate, both with going barrels, fully jewelled, straight line calibrated lever escapements with divided lift and straight pallets, banking against the escape wheels arbour, draw, bimetallic steel/platinum compensation balances, gold and platinum screws, with pare-chute suspension on both pivots, blued steel Breguet free-sprung balance springs, glazed cuvette, engine-turned silver dial, two small subsidiary dials for the mean time, to the left subsidiary dial with Arabic suspended numerals, outer minute track and yellow gold Breguet hands, with inside at noon a subsidiary dial for the seconds, with yellow gold equilibrated hand, symmetrically to the right another subsidiary dial with radial Roman numerals, outer minute track and blued steel Breguet hands, with equilibrated central second blued steel hand, the circular four body "forme quatre baguettes" case, chiselled band; ball-shaped pendant and round bow, signed on the dial and numbered 2667 on the case, case no. 1887 by Jean-Louis Joly 63.7 mm. diam.

  • CHESuisse
  • 2012-05-14
Prix ​​d'adjudication
Voir le prix
Annonce

The Uncovered Amphora Attributable to Piguet & Capt, the enamel by the workshop of J-L. Richter, Geneva, circa 1805, made for the Chinese market

The Uncovered Amphora Attributable to Piguet & Capt, the enamel by the workshop of J-L. Richter, Geneva, circa 1805, made for the Chinese market. Magnificent 18K gold and enamel, pearl-set musical form watch with automaton scene, designed as an amphora, the second of a unique pair. Accompanied by period fitted box. C. The painted enamel panel below the watch covers a musical automaton scene. The oval watch has a central visible stone-set oscillating balance. The panel shows a mother with her child who is holding grapes, in the manner of Elisabeth Vigée-Lebrun (1755-1842). It is hinged so that when a catch is released it rises forwards. A small push on one side of the amphora sets the music and automaton going. A little boy to the left raises and lowers a stick, trying to encourage a dog to jump over it. To the right, also in varicolored gold, is a young lady playing a guitar. The painted background, through which the mechanism is wound, is of a classical urn upon a pedestal within a wooded landscape. Seven rows of graduated pearls run to the base which is decorated in polychrome champlevé enamel. The decoration is repeated on the reverse of the amphora, and the sides have foliate engraving, pearls and polychrome champlevé enamel, some of which is translucent. Graduated pearls decorate the back as well as the front of the handles. An oval painted enamel of a pair of nesting doves within a garland of flowers covers the watch movement. This opens onto the cuvette through which the mechanism is wound and set. The panel in the center below has a pastoral scene of a herdsman driving his cattle to drink beside a bridge, with a village and castle beyond. Later stopper. D. Oval, blue enamel plate with an aperture for viewing the four-arm polished steel diamond-set balance, beneath, the white enamel dial with Breguet numerals, above, subsidiary seconds dial. Blued-steel "spade" hands. M. 14.3 x 27 mm., oval, full plate brass, fixed barrel, cylinder escapement, steel escapement wheel, silver four-arm balance. Music and automaton driven by a five-wheel train, the last pinion with a small two-wing fly as a regulator. Pinned barrel with a stack of six tuned teeth. The automaton is activated by two cams mounted on the extension of an additional wheel driven by the musical train. Dim. 102 x 58 mm.

  • CHESuisse
  • 2002-04-13
Prix ​​d'adjudication
Voir le prix

The Skin of our Teeth

Cecily Brown makes no distinction between abstraction and figuration; rather, her work is concerned with translating sensation into paint. Anchored by the human body, her paintings divulge intimate passages of flesh via a constellation of luscious brushstrokes. Together these gestural marks and glots of paint posit a recapitulation of the canonical tradition of the painted nude. Created in 1999, The Skin of Our Teeth is a feast of flesh that invokes the abundance of Ingres Turkish Bath, the provocation of Picassos Demoiselles, the expressive corporality of Willem de Koonings Women, and the carnality of Francis Bacons writhing bodies. Indeed, Brown is nothing if not acutely cognisant of her painterly forebears; and yet, her works encompass more than mere art historical allusion. Drawing from literature, film, music, magazines and photographic sources, Brown paints a resolutely contemporary bodily experience. Titled The Skin of Our Teeth a phrase that conjures a narrow escape from disaster this painting perhaps refers to Thomas Wilders play of the same name, which won the Pulitzer Prize for drama in 1943. Across three acts the play forms an allegory for the plight of mankind; although set in modern times, the characters draw on classical and mythological archetypes while the disaster-fuelled narrative of the play underlines its central conceit: mankinds incessant ability to survive by the skin of our teeth. Brown has frequently bestowed literary titles upon her paintings Anton Checkhovs A Lady with the Little Dog and W. B. Yeats Circus Animals Desertion are two such examples of literary works whose titles have been appropriated by Brown for paintings created in 2009-10 and 2013 respectively. Furthermore, alongside the literary world, Pop culture references also play an important role for Brown; for example, in 2013 she embarked on an entire series based on the famous photograph of nude women that graces the front cover of Jimi Hendrixs classic album, Electric Ladyland (1968). Executed in luscious pinks, hot reds, peachy flesh tones and accented with swipes of yellow and black, the present work is among the most corporeal of Browns oeuvre; and yet, one struggles to locate the explicit anatomical inclusions that insidiously punctuate her works on canvas. Instead, the viewers eye roves across the scatological slippages and spills that loosely delineate what may be a buttock, leg, or breast; each limb or body part writhes in concert within the thronging mass of Browns undeniably orgiastic panorama. Sexuality has played a central role in Browns work since the very beginning. Her first exhibition with Gagosian Gallery in 1999 the same year the present work was painted was called Skin Game and showed works characterised by their overtly sexual nature. As Brown has explained: I think I was doing a lot of sexual paintings what I wanted in a way that I think now is too literal was for the paint to embody the same sensations that bodies would. Oil paint very easily suggests bodily fluids and flesh I've always wanted to have a lot of different ways of saying something so that you might have a veil of paint that suggests some very delicate skin, but then I'll want something very meaty and clogged next to it (Cecily Brown in conversation with Gaby Wood in: Gaby Wood, I Like it Cheap and Nasty, The Guardian, 12 June 2005, online). Belonging to this same moment, The Skin of Our Teeth promiscuously flits between a manifold field of provocative association and meaning. Indeed, the skin and teeth of the paintings title works to underline the carnality of Browns composition. Skin and teeth, flesh and bone the stuff of animalistic human existence is borne forth through a painterly frenzy in which boundaries are transgressed and the body becomes landscape. Signed and dated 1999 on the reverse

  • GBRGrande Bretagne
  • 2018-06-26
Prix ​​d'adjudication
Voir le prix

“King Fouad” Vacheron & Constantin, Genève, No. 402833, case No. 251058. Started in 1914, presented to King Fouad I of Egypt, by the Swiss expatriate

“King Fouad” Vacheron & Constantin, Genève, No. 402833, case No. 251058. Started in 1914, presented to King Fouad I of Egypt, by the Swiss expatriate community in 1929. Exceptionally fine, highly important and unique, large 18K yellow gold and enamel, keyless, astronomical carillon trip minute-repeating, grande and petite sonnerie with silence, two-train clockwatch with split-seconds chronograph, 30-minute register, perpetual calendar and phases and age of the moon. Accompanied by a Certificate of Authenticity. C. Four-body, massive, “bassine à filets”, polished, back with the arms of King Fouad the First in polychromeenamel, hinged gold cuvette inscribed “A Sa Majesté, Fouad 1er, Hommage de la Colonie Suisse d’Egypte, 1929”.D. Matte silver, black champlevé upright Arabic numerals, outer minute track with chronograph track dividedinto fifths with five-minute/seconds Arabic markers, aperture for the day and date at 12, concentric leap yearand month dial at 9, 30-minute recorder at 3, subsidiary seconds with moon phase aperture and lunar age sectorat 6. Blued steel Breguet hands. M. Cal. R.A. 21’’’ 74/12, maillechort, “fausses côtes” decoration, 46 jewels, twotrains, straight line lever escapement, cut bimetallic compensation balance with eight adjustments, improvedVacheron & Constantin micrometer regulator (Patents CH101652, registered 1 November 1923 and CH105967,registered 1 November 1924), tandem winding, split-seconds mechanism set on the back plate, striking on threegongs, repeating on three gongs by three hammers through trip in the band, grande/petite sonnerie andstrike/silent levers on the band, chronograph pusher co-axial to the winding crown, split seconds via a pusher inthe band.Dial, case and movement signed.Diam. 67 mm.

  • CHESuisse
  • 2005-04-03
Prix ​​d'adjudication
Voir le prix

Breguet, No. 217 “montre perpétuelle à répétition à quantième...

Breguet, No. 217 “montre perpétuelle à répétition à quantième de mois et dates et équation, échappement libre à ancre”. An exceptional and historically important, probably unique 18K gold self-winding à toc quarter repeating lever watch with sectoral equation of time, day and month calendar and sectoral power-reserve indication, constructed on the principals of the garde-temps, in a Desoutter gold tooled red morocco fitted box No. 217 Signed Breguet et Fils, sold in Germinal an 8 (1800) to Général Moreau for the sum of 3,600 Francs, resold to Mr. Havas on 31st December 1817 for 4,800 Francs Gilded brass movement with two mainspring barrels, early jewelled lever escapement with steel lever and pallet frame, brass escape wheel, four arm compensation balance supporting two compensating affixes with adjustable weights on screws at the free ends, platinum shield-shaped oscillating weight, blued steel helical balance spring with terminal curves and screw stud, parachute suspension, equation of time cam mounted on the month calendar wheel, à toc quarter repeating with one hammer onto the case, weight lock and advance/retard levers in the band, engine-turned silver dial, Roman numerals on plain chapter ring, outer dot minute divisions, gold Breguet hands, two fan-shaped sectors for 60-hours power reserve and equation of time calibrated from +15 to -15 minutes, large subsidiary seconds concentric to the month ring, aperture for the date with gold arrow pointer, circular polished case with concealed hinge, back secured by two screws in the band, quarter repeating pull-twist push-piece in the pendant, dial signed Breguet et Fils, the reverse punched B 217 T for Tavernier, dial plate edge signed Breguet No. 217, case No. B 217. 55 mm. diam.

  • CHESuisse
  • 2016-05-16
Prix ​​d'adjudication
Voir le prix

The henry graves jr. 18k yellow gold tonneau minute repeating wristwatch engrave

• circular manual winding nickel lever movement, bi-metallic compensation balance • gilt tonneau dial, painted black enamel Breguet numerals, subsidiary seconds, blued steel spade hands • the case of tonneau form, the band fitted with slide, back engraved with Graves' Coat-of-Arms • case, dial and movement signed • with an 18k yellow gold Patek Philippe buckle With an Extract from the Archives confirming the date of manufacture of the movement in 1895, encasement in 1927, and subsequent sale on June 16th, 1928. Research has shown that this previously unknown watch is likely to be the earliest minute repeating wristwatch purchased by Henry Graves, Jr. Henry Graves Jr., is known to have owned four minute repeating wristwatches. The present watch is also the only one made for Graves in yellow gold. The three others were cased in platinum. Of those, the most famous and nearly identical to the present lot is No.198212, now in the Patek Philippe Museum. For an illustration of No.198212, see Huber, M. & Banbery, A., Patek Philippe Wristwatches, Second Edition, p. 315. One platinum example, in a smaller cushion form case, No. 198095 appeared at auction for the first time in 2010 and another platinum cushion repeater, No. 198378 appeared at auction over 20 years ago.  At this early date, very few minute repeating wristwatches were manufactured by Patek Philippe. It is thought that the earliest minute repeater built as a wristwatch was created in 1906, but may have never been cased. From 1925, the sale of minute repeating wristwatches can be traced and were made up until 1942. That said, there are only twelve today known from the earliest production period. It is not until post war times, in the late 1940s into the early 1950s, that Patek Philippe's production of minute repeaters was done in series and models were assigned reference numbers. Of further interest is the fact that this watch was delivered a year following Henry Graves, Jr.'s most famous watch commission for No. 198035, the Supercomplication. Today there are twelve Patek Philippe minute repeating wristwatches known from the early part of the 20th century.  Of this group, only three have tonneau cases: two were made for Graves, and the third is known through a published archival photograph. The illustration is in Armbandurhen, Khalert, H., Mühe, R. and Brunner, G. p. 39. It should be noted that the first digit of the movement number is cut off in the photograph, however it is most likely 198306.

  • USAUSA
  • 2012-06-14
Prix ​​d'adjudication
Voir le prix

Patek philippe's first split-seconds chronograph wristwatch, no 124824

MOVEMENT• 12''' rhodium plated, especially flat Extra quality movement, straight line lever escapement, 23 jewels, 8 adjustments, bi-metallic compensation balance, the split second chronograph work likely to be produced by Victorin Piguet, the chronograph function controlled via the button on the band for start, stop and reset to zero, the split second hand function controlled via the winding crown DIAL• white enamel dial with painted black enamel Breguet numerals, subsidiary dials for constant seconds and rare 60 minute register, the outer chapter ring calibrated for 1/5th seconds in black enamel CASE• circular four-piece hinged Officer's style 18k yellow gold case, hinged gold cuvette, screw down bars with slender lugs, with an early 18k buckle MARKS• the dial, cuvette, movement and case signed, the case further stamped with French import marks and further stamped with another mark with PD with hour glass emblem above and ampersand (&) below Accompanied by the Extract from the Archives confirming date of sale on 13 October 1923. Within the pantheon of important vintage Patek Philippe watches, only a handful are of such importance and renown that they have obtained iconic status. The Patek Philippe split-seconds chronograph, no.124.824, belongs within this category and is, without question, one of the most famous and coveted of all Patek Philippe’s vintage wristwatch production. This wristwatch first re-appeared to the public eye in 1999 when it was the cover lot of the The Art of Patek Philippe auction and sold by Antiquorum, November 14th 1999, lot 448. The purchase price broke all previous wristwatch records when this extraordinary split-seconds chronograph sold for nearly CHF 3 million, at the time the equivalent of $1,918,387. Antiquorum’s auction catalogue chronicled that the watch "shed new light on the historic production of the Genevan House.  It appeared five years prior to the official release of the split-seconds chronograph, making Patek Philippe the first manufacturer to have created this model”. This timepiece is not only the world’s earliest known split-seconds chronograph born as a wristwatch by any maker, but furthermore is considered the prototype for the split-seconds chronograph category. A combination that shows it as, not only of great importance within the history of Patek Philippe, but also within the development of this genre as a whole. It should also be noted that this timepiece is one of the earliest complicated wristwatches ever made by Patek Philippe and may be the earliest still remaining in private hands. • Patek Philippe’s, and any maker's, earliest known split-seconds chronograph wristwatch • Smallest and flattest known split-seconds movement • Only split-seconds chronograph wristwatch known with enamel dial • Only known Patek Philippe vintage chronograph wristwatch with 60-minute counter • Inspiration for the contemporary Patek Philippe ref.5959 split-seconds chronograph wristwatch Extremely mechanically complex, the split-seconds chronograph is considered one of the three most challenging complications in the art of watch making and is consequently one of the most celebrated by collectors. Designed to time events commencing simultaneously but concluding at different times, the split-seconds chronograph, as we know it today, first appeared around 1880. The split-seconds mechanism employs two central chronograph seconds hands, most often controlled by two push buttons in the case side; the present watch features the rarer single button activation with split pusher above. One hand, the fly-back, can be stopped to register one event's duration then, in turn, reactivated to resynchronize with the chronograph hand; this will allow, for instance, the timing and registering of an intermediary stage. Thus the length of multiple events can be recorded. This complication proves extremely useful during sporting events with multiple competitors, whether it be a horse race, a car race or the 100 meter dash. One of the most interesting features of this watch is the 60-minute register, which is highly unusual.  Patek Philippe chronograph minute registers are usually only calibrated to 30 minutes – indeed, our research suggests that this is the only vintage Patek Philippe wristwatch chronograph to have such a calibration. This wristwatch features an “Officer” style case with straight, screw-set lugs and rounded, hinged, four-piece case. This was one of the earliest wristwatch case designs to be used by Patek Philippe and is complimented by the use of a white enamel dial. Extraordinarily flat in design, the movement of No. 124.824 is the earliest and smallest split seconds chronograph wristwatch movement by Patek Philippe. Incredibly, the movement was so innovative that, 100 years later, it was pushed back into service as the working model for its contemporary cousin, the Ref. 5959 split seconds chronograph, which Patek Philippe introduced in 2005. It is interesting to compare the Ref. 5959’s calibre 27 525 PS (12 CCR) movement with that of the present wristwatch, for the similarities are visually striking. Indeed, the similarities between the present wristwatch, No. 124.824, and the modern Ref. 5959 are not confined to the movement: the entire dial and case design are faithfully based upon the original No. 124.824 masterpiece. The production of the Ref. 5959, a century after No. 124.824 was begun, demonstrates the extraordinary status that Patek Philippe has accorded the present lot, their original split seconds chronograph wristwatch. Following the production of No. 124.824, further production and development of wrist chronographs did not begin until 1926, when Patek Philippe began using the ébauches (blank movements) of Victorin Piguet. Production of a split-seconds chronograph following the designs of the 13-lignes Louis-Elisée Piguet ébauche began in 1927. The economic crisis of 1929 slowed production and very few complicated wristwatches were made during the 1930s. This is perhaps unsurprising when one considers that the finished split-seconds chronograph was up to 50% more expensive than the simple chronograph. [Huber, M., Banbery, A., Patek Philippe Wristwatches, Vol. 2 Second Edition, p. 81]. The enamel dial on this wristwatch is of the highest quality and would have been produced by dial makers Stern Frères. The dial features a signature known as the so-called “block” layout which highlights the letters so that they form a perfect rectangle. This style can be found on other iconic Patek Philippe wristwatches such as the Henry Graves Minute Repeating Tonneau wristwatch, sold by Sotheby’s New York, Lot 8, June 14, 2012. The same signature can also be found on the earliest known repeating wristwatch, see Huber M., Banbery A., Wristwatches, Vol. 2, Second Edition, p. 313, pl. 468a. Enamel dials are much preferred by collectors since, unlike metal dials, they are not susceptible to oxidation or water damage and, when well looked after, can retain their original finish indefinitely. The pure unblemished finish of the enamel dial remains as fresh in its appearance today as it would have appeared on the day of its original sale.

  • USAUSA
  • 2014-06-10
Prix ​​d'adjudication
Voir le prix

A highly interesting and historically important stainless steel...

Rolex Case, dial, movement and bracelet signed First launched in 1965, reference 6240 was manufactured exclusively in stainless steel and featured an acrylic bezel that displayed the tachymeter. It was most notably the first “Cosmograph” wristwatch equipped with screw- down chronograph pushers, which provided improved water resistance. Produced for a few years only, reference 6240 eventually evolved to the well-known references 6263 and 6265.Most probably unique and incredibly important, this reference 6240 presents a completely novel and unprecedented way of understanding the “Cosmograph”. To the best of our knowledge, there is no other timepiece that features this dial configuration.This dial also displays a color scheme that we never seen again anywhere in Rolex’s production. Furthermore, its proportions are also quite unique, thanks to its oversized subsidiary dials that nearly touch the outer white seconds track. Any Cosmograph boasting oversized registers is called today a “Big Eye”. This example’s unicorn characteristics are underlined by the fact that the dial omits any Cosmographs and Oyster designation as well as any hint that it belongs to the Daytona family. This layout is truly unlike anything the market has ever seen before.The ancestor of the “Paul Newman”, this timepiece was presumably created before exotic dials were serially produced and during a time when Rolex experimented with various design codes. Thus, “The Neanderthal” provides a rare window into the inner workings of Rolex, enabling collectors to first, imagine what could be, and second, peek into the firm's past to understand the conceptual development and visual history of the Cosmograph Daytona “Paul Newman” design.Other interesting features of note are the correct first series pushers, with the brass peeking through the pushers, having aged with patina over time giving the wristwatch a lot of character. The watch furthermore retains its original twinlock 700 series winding crown, characterized by only the Rolex coronet.

  • CHESuisse
  • 2018-05-12
Prix ​​d'adjudication
Voir le prix

Untitled

Just as one can compose colors, or forms, so one can compose motions. Alexander Calder cited in: Modern Painting and Sculpture, Berkshire Museum, 1933 Created in 1956, the present mobile by Alexander Calder was acquired by the twentieth-century Italian sculptor, Marcello Mascherini the same year. Having remained in the Mascherini family collection since this time, its appearance at auction illustrates a unique creative dialogue between two ostensibly divergent, yet conceptually linked artists. Known for figurative bronze sculptures that echo the absolute forms of Jean Arp and Alexander Archipenko, Mascherini sought out a graceful freedom of natural form in ways that are parallel to the smooth gliding lines of Calders mobiles. Concerned with space as much as concrete materiality, both artists work can be considered as treatises on the mutability of sculpture and our relationship to it. Whether or not both artists knew each other is unclear, however, because Mascherini was a member of the Venice Biennale Council in 1952  the year Calder won the Grand Prize for sculpture  it is very likely that both artists would have met prior to the acquisition of the present work. First exhibited in at Galleria dellObelisco in Rome, the present work was created at the very height of Calders career. During the late 1940s and early 1950s Calder had already been championed as an abstract artist of sophistication and significant avant-garde import; in 1943 he became the youngest artist ever to be afforded a retrospective at the Museum of Modern Art, New York; in 1949, he created his largest mobile to date, International Mobile, an immensely impressive work that was the centrepiece of the 3rd International Exhibition of Sculpture at the Philadelphia Museum of Art; and a couple of years later he was the prize-winning flag bearer of American post-war art the 1952 Venice Biennale. Herein, narrating this period of artistic assurance and critical acclaim, the present work comprises the absolute essence of Calders aesthetic. Individually painted metal elements, in a simple palette of black, white and red, appear suspended within a delicately constructed arrangement of form. The small black and white elements seamlessly offset the ethereal gliding movements of the individual coloured shapes below as they each pursue their own unique path. The large red elements and cascade of variously sized black elements are suspended in perfect counterbalance to one another; as the slightest breath of air drifts through they begin to rotate smoothly and organically. In the catalogue essay for Calders seminal 1946 exhibition at Galerie Louis Carré in Paris, the French existentialist philosopher Jean-Paul Sartre distilled the unique complexity of the artists mobiles: Calder establishes a general fated course of movement, then abandons them to it: time, sun, heat and wind will determine each particular dance. Thus the object is always midway between the servility of the statue and the independence of natural events. Each of its twists and turns is an inspiration of the moment. In it you can discern the theme composed by its marker, but the mobile weaves a thousand variations on it. It is a little hot-jazz tune, unique and ephemeral, like the sky, like the morning. If you missed it, it is lost forever (Jean-Paul Sartre, Les Mobiles de Calder' in Exh. Cat., Paris, Galerie Louis Carré, Alexander Calder: Mobiles, Stabiles, Constellations, pp. 9-19). As brilliantly described by Sartre, the best examples of Calders mobile sculptures, such as Untitled, are thoughtfully and deliberately composed by the artist and then left to commune autonomously and naturally with their physical environment; the precise quality of their movements dependent on the slightest atmospheric shift. Marcel Duchamp coined the term 'mobile' for Calder's works in 1931, after which Calder went on to revolutionise the concept of traditional sculpture by utilising the full potential of bodies in motion through a remarkable manipulation of metal and wire. Calders earliest wire sculptures frequently portraits of well-known figures of the day had caused a sensation when exhibited in Paris and New York during the late 1920s, yet the sculptor still sought the elusive breakthrough that would enable him to forge an entirely new form of artistic expression. The answer arrived during a now legendary visit to Piet Mondrians studio in 1930, where the sight of rectangles of coloured paper, arranged on the wall for the purpose of compositional experimentation, inspired Calder to think of the kinetic possibilities of art. Following this legendary visit, Calder spent the next twenty years perfecting his now iconic mobiles. In an interview at the time of his first New York gallery show in 1930 Calder announced: Why must art be static... You look at an abstraction, sculptured or painted, an intensely exciting arrangement of planes, spheres, nuclei, entirely without meaning. It would be perfect, but it is always still. The next step in sculpture is motion (Alexander Calder cited in: Howard Greenfield, The Essential Alexander Calder, New York 2003, p. 67). From that seminal moment on, Calder remained steadfast in his exploration of sculptures potential for kinetic movement. This work is registered in the archives of the Calder Foundation, New York, under application number A18117. Incised with the artist's monogram on the white element

  • GBRGrande Bretagne
  • 2018-06-26
Prix ​​d'adjudication
Voir le prix

Geneva, attributable to Frères Rochat, made for the Chinese market, circa 1820. Extremely rare and magnificent pair of gold and enamel pearl- and diam

Geneva, attributable to Frères Rochat, made for the Chinese market, circa 1820. Extremely rare and magnificent pair of gold and enamel pearl- and diamond-set singing bird pistols. C. Made entirely of gold and enamel in the form of a double-barreled flintlock pistol, conjoined hexagonal barrels in translucent dark blue enamel over flinqué with gold scrollwork simulating damascene work, the opening set with diamonds and terminating with hinged panel enameled on the outside with black enamel and inside painted with a bird among flowers, the gold pan sides with rectangular gold plaques with concave corners, one depicting a sleeping lion, the other an antelope with black enamel border in diamond-set frame, the bottom of the pan decorated with a pattern of alternating straps of gold and black enamel, the grips with translucent scarlet enamel over engine-turning with pearl-set rosette in the middle with rose-cut diamond in the center, lower edge set with half pearls, upper edge decorated with wreath of laurel leaves made of graduated half pearls and black enamel, the back of the grip decorated with gold and black enamel fine crossing pattern with scrolling set with graduated half pearls. The top edge set with half pearls, gold matted and engraved hammers, the head of the flint vise engraved with lion’s heads, gold vise nuts terminated with diamonds, agate flints, gold pan covers mirror polished inside and engraved with acanthus leaves on the outside with their springs terminating with diamonds, opening under the right pan cover for sound, three barrel-like ramrod pipes, the ramrod containing the key for the watch. M. Rectangular, two tier, each slightly different, 115 x 29 mm, brass, reversed fusee and chain, six cams set on the extension of the second wheel arbor controlling the sound (whistle), the bird’s movements (turning, flapping wings, opening the beak and moving tail) controlled by two cams set on the same arbor between the plates, unusual mechanism for lifting and retrieving the bird, where both functions have their own mechanisms, each with its own spring, circular bellows. Punched with unidentified mark on chain ring of one of the pistols. Dim. Length 145 mm., width 38 mm.

  • CHESuisse
  • 2002-10-19
Prix ​​d'adjudication
Voir le prix

A superlative, highly important and extremely rare gold world-time

Patek Philippe case, dial and movement signed by maker; case furthermore signed by retailer Jean Guillermin The present piece is one of the most breathtaking specimens of the iconic reference 2523, by far the most appreciated, elegant, collectible and sought-after world-time model ever produced by any manufacturer. Beyond the appeal of the reference in itself, this example sports three extremely remarkable features.First and foremost, its case is preserved in absolutely unspoiled condition. The design of this reference is characterized by the angular and faceted lugs raised above the bezel. Obviously, such a detail is easily spoiled by even the lightest polishing, and to be able to behold - let alone to own - such a spectacularly preserved piece truly is a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity.Secondarily, its dial is fitted with an engine-turned decoration. So far, only two other yellow gold 2523 are known with a similar dial, thus making this variation the rarest of them all for a yellow gold case, together with the blue enamel décor. It is also interesting to note how the guillochage found on ref. 2523 is different than the one found on ref. 2523/1: 2523 presents gilt engine-turning rather than silver, and with a more elaborate design, featuring a satin ring with roman and baton numerals framing the engine-turned center. Last, but not least, the present piece was retailed by famed French jeweler Jean Guillermin and it features on the case back, absolutely unspoiled and perfectly recognizable, not only the two French import marks (the “Owl”), but also the stamp of the retailer itself. It has to be underlined how unusual it is to find a two-crown world time – whether ref. 2523, or 2523/1 – signed by the retailer. Only two other examples are known from the market: a 2523 signed by Gobbi, and a 2523/1 signed by Tiffany.

  • HKGHong Kong
  • 2017-11-28
Prix ​​d'adjudication
Voir le prix

* Veuillez noter que le prix ne correspond pas à la valeur d'aujourd'hui, mais uniquement à la devise au moment de l'achat.

Montres & Horlogerie

Les montres pour hommes et femmes, les montres de poche, les horloges de grand-père mais aussi les horloges murales et de tables peuvent être trouvés dans cette catégorie. Vous y trouverez des montres vintage ainsi que des montres design à la mode pour tous les gouts.