Toutes les enchères en un seul endroit

Paramètres de recherche
  • Mobilier, Design & Miroirs

    19 377 En vente

    1 099 743 Vendu

  • 0—8 760 000 EUR
  • 4 mai 1989—24 juin 2017

A Highly Important late Louis XVI ormolu-mounted Japanese black and gilt lacquer and ebony commode à vantaux and

A Highly Important late Louis XVI ormolu-mounted Japanese black and gilt lacquer and ebony commode à vantaux and secrétaire à abattant en suite late 18th century, attributed to Adam Weisweiler and Pierre-Philippe Thomire, possibly under the direction of Martin-Eloi Lignereux, The commode à vantaux with rectangular Egyptian granito rosso top surrounded by an ormolu border cast with gadroons and flowers upon a slightly breakfront frieze fitted with three drawers and mounted all around with ormolu anthemia and palmettes, the front with central cupboard door inset with a pair of ormolu-framed stylized uchiwa fans depicting pavillions and floral sprays on a roiro ground, the side doors inset with ormolu-framed rectangular seventeenth-century takamakie, hiramakie, and kirigane lacquer on a roiro ground depicting landscapes, the angles mounted with putto herms holding baskets of grapes and terminating in part-patinated and fluted ormolu supports mounted with flowers and raised on trumpet-form socles cast with leaves, the sides inset with ormolu-framed seventeenth-century Japanese lacquer panels depicting buildings in landscapes, the conforming plinth with rounded angles and shaped apron mounted with ormolu rosettes, foliage and shell motifs, raised upon ormolu-mounted patinated bronze paw feet; the granite top with stenciled inventory number 1101, inscription in black paint Bk Morning Room Hartmann, inscribed in black pencil lot 176, 176, 327, ... Room and in blue pencil 24; the secrétaire à abattant with rectangular breccia marble top framed by an ormolu border cast with gadroons and flowers, the frieze fitted with one long drawer and mounted all around with ormolu anthemia and palmettes, the fall-front inset with an ormolu-framed seventeenth-century Japanese lacquer panel depicting figures in a landscape in aogai and inlaid with a leather writing surface on reverse, the interior fitted with two shelves above six small drawers flanking a central compartment which can be removed to reveal two secret drawers, the angles mounted with an ormolu maiden on each side surmounted by capitals cast with palmettes and supported by balusters decorated with acanthus, the lower section with cupboard doors inset with seventeenth-century Japanese lacquer panels framed by ormolu bands and depicting mountainous landscapes, the lower interior fitted with one shelf and a coffre-fort, the sides inset with ormolu-framed rectangular seventeenth-century lacquer panels decorated in takamakie, hiramakie, and kirigane on a roiro ground, the four lower corners and the back upper corners with fluted and brass-inlaid pilasters, the plinth with shaped apron mounted with ormolu rosettes, foliage and shell motifs, raised on ormolu-mounted patinated bronze paw feet; the marble top with stenciled inventory number 1105, inscription in black paint Morning Rm Secretaire Hartmann and with writing in red pencil 1st Portion. Height of commode 38 1/2 in.; width of commode 5 ft. 5 in.; depth of commode 27 1/2 in.; height of secrétaire 4 ft. 7 1/4 in.; width of secrétaire 36 1/2 in.; depth of secrétaire 17 1/4 in. 98 cm; 165.5 cm; 70 cm; 140.5 cm; 93 cm; 44 cm

  • USAUSA
  • 2011-10-18
Prix ​​d'adjudication
Voir le prix
Annonce

A LOUIS XIV ORMOLU-MOUNTED AND BOULLE BRASS-INLAID BROWN TORTOISESHELL BUREAU PLAT

A LOUIS XIV ORMOLU-MOUNTED AND BOULLE BRASS-INLAID BROWN TORTOISESHELL BUREAU PLAT CIRCA 1710, ATTRIBUTED TO ANDRE-CHARLES BOULLE Inlaid overall en première partie, the rounded rectangular tooled long-grain brown leather top with monumental pounced and moulded border with domed lambrequin and scallop-shell corner clasps, the inverted breakfront frieze with three walnut-lined frieze drawers, the central drawer with weeping Heraclitus handle, all inlaid with foliate arabesque marquetry within channelled borders, the kneehole flanked by gadrooned berried laurel swept mounts, the shaped side drawers with cartouche escutcheons and baluster handles, the arched ends with further arabesque panels with a Bacchic mask with ribbon-tied garlanded hair, with descending husk-trailed chutes and acanthus scroll sabots, the plain ebonised walnut moulding directly beneath the top almost certainly original but with one end section replaced, the central drawer with replaced support, the side drawers with later cross-struts to the interior to prevent tipping, the right-hand of the kneehole concealing a spring-loaded hidden secret drawer to interior, the underside of the top inscribed 'DEVA', the reverse of the frieze with simulated drawers with handwritten blue paper label numbered '8944' 41¾ in. (80.5 cm.) high; 80½ in. (204 cm.) wide; 41¼ in. (105 cm.) deep

  • GBRGrande Bretagne
  • 2005-12-14
Prix ​​d'adjudication
Voir le prix
Annonce
Annonce

THE IMPORTANT HOLLINGSWORTH FAMILY CHIPPENDALE CARVED WALNUT HIGH CHEST-OF-DRAWERS, MATCHING DRESSING TABLE AND SIDECHAIR

THE IMPORTANT HOLLINGSWORTH FAMILY CHIPPENDALE CARVED WALNUT HIGH CHEST-OF-DRAWERS, MATCHING DRESSING TABLE AND SIDECHAIR Thomas Affleck (1740-1795), Philadelphia, 1765-1775 The high chest in two sections: the upper with a molded, broken-scroll pediment with carved rosettes centering a naturalistically carved rococo cartouche flanked by three-part, flame finials with fluted plinths above five thumb-nail molded small drawers, the center top drawer with a carved shell and acanthus appliques, over three large thumb-nail molded drawers flanked by fluted quarter columns; the lower section with applied moldings above a case with a long thumb-nail molded drawer over three small drawers, the center with a carved shell and acanthus appliqus, above an elaborately shaped skirt with a central applied scallop shell, flanked by fluted quarter-columns, on acanthus carved cabriole legs with ball-and-claw feet. The dressing table with a rectangular top with molded edge above a conforming case fitted with one long thumb-nail molded drawer over three small drawers, the center with a carved shell and acanthus appliqus, above an elaborately shaped skirt with a central applied scallop shell, flanked by fluted quarter-columns, on acanthus carved cabriole legs with ball-and-claw feet. The chair with a serpentine, bowed crest centering a carved shell flanked by acanthus foliage and bold shell-carved ears above an interlaced strap-work splat with deeply modeled volutes and leafage and a carved shoe flanked by fluted stiles over a trapezoidal slip-seat with original needlework upholstery, the front seat rail centering a carved shell, on acanthus-carved cabriole front legs with ball-and-claw feet high chest 94in. high, 42in. wide, 21in. deep; dressing table; 30in. high, 48in. wide, 19in. deep; chair 40in. high (3)

  • USAUSA
  • 1998-01-16
Prix ​​d'adjudication
Voir le prix

A PAIR OF GEORGE III GILTWOOD ARMCHAIRS

A PAIR OF GEORGE III GILTWOOD ARMCHAIRS DESIGNED BY ROBERT ADAM AND MADE BY THOMAS CHIPPENDALE, 1765 Each with padded back, arms and seat covered in blue floral cut-velvet silk damask, the shaped rectangular back framed with foliage-bound reeding, headed at the angles by paterae, the scrolled serpentine toprail centred by a pierced anthemia, the padded arms with scrolled foliate supports, the terminals with flowerheads, the padded serpentine-fronted seat above a deep seat-rail edged with a husk border carved with a shell issuing scrolling foliage ending in winged sphinxes, the sides with interlaced scrolls and sphinxes, the back with scrolls, on cabriole legs headed by anthemions suspending ribbon-tied wreaths, on hairy paw feet headed by a beaded girdle enclosing anti-friction castors, both chairs with incised constructional numerals, one chair numbered on the back of the front-rail 'III' and with chalk inscription 'M.H. 28/11', the other numbered 'VI', the seat-rails raised for upholstery tacking, with large screw-holes in the centre of each seat-rail and at the top of each leg for constructional tightening, the frames and side seat-rails in beechwood, the side seat-rail facings, front seat-rails and legs in limewood, with beech cross-struts, originally oil-gilt, now water-gilt over a thin lacquer with traces of original oil-gilding 42 in. (107 cm.) high; the seats 27 in. (68.5 cm.) wide; 29¾ in. (75.5 cm.) wide, overall; 29½ in. (75 cm.) deep

  • GBRGrande Bretagne
  • 2008-06-18
Prix ​​d'adjudication
Voir le prix

"The Stream of Life" Window from the First Presbyterian Church of

Attributed to Agnes Northrupwith upper tracery elements (illustrated) and three lower inscription panels (not illustrated) Signed and dated TIFFANY STUDIOS N.Y. 1914 in enamel The Stream of Life Tiffany Studios is known today for having introduced the landscape as a suitable subject for religious or devotional windows. In 1881, Louis Comfort Tiffany's first landscape, for an unknown church in Newark, New Jersey, appeared as a sketch in American Stained Glass, a pivotal three-part article by Roger Riordan in American Art Review. The Studio started making landscape windows in earnest in 1895, when Agnes F. Northrop (1857-1953), Tiffanys principal floral-window designer, created one for the Church of the Savior (now First Unitarian Church) in Brooklyn, New York. Landscapes would become a hallmark of the Tiffany style, and leave an enduring mark the history of this art form. The present window personifies Northrops mature style, drawn with confidence and mastery of her subject. A deeply contemplative scene, the composition is a quiet glade in the woods enclosed in trees. Distant mountains are visible only on the far left through a break in the foliage. A small waterfall in the center foreground focuses our attention, the sound of trickling water almost audible. The landscape is still, with huge boulders in the foreground signifying an eternity of time. Low blooming shrubs in the background replace Tiffanys usual riot of flowers, giving the scene solemnity and peace. There is a feeling of specificity here, as though we are visiting a particular place that was known to the donors or dedicatees. The magnificent selection of glass enhances this sense of peace. The flowing colors of the foreground boulders lend them weight, mass, and form. Selected to suggest soft, rounded glacier-tumbled rock, splotches of gold, green, and blue in each piece of glass hint at moss and lichen colonies on damp surfaces. Confetti or fractured glass forms foliage and shrubs, the shards of colored glass embedded in it emulating individual branches and leaves. Mottled or cats-paw glass creates dappled sunlight on the forest floor. The small meandering stream that culminates as a small cascade in the foreground is realistically depicted using plating (layering) of striated and etched glass. In his development of the landscape for religious windows, Tiffany answered a desire from liberal American congregations to illustrate the glory of Gods creation of this beautiful country, instead of Popish saints and rote Biblical stories. A central tenet of many of the newer Protestant sects, as well as a popular theme in American painting, was the sublime presence of the divine in nature. In his long-time employee Agnes Northrop, Tiffany found an able interpreter of the American landscape. Both Tiffany and Northrop were avid floral painters and garden aficionados. Northrop was raised in Flushing, Queens, amid lush gardens and nurseries. She spent her free time drawing or photographing flowers, shrubs, and vines. From the time of her hiring in 1884, Northrops role was to design floral windows, or parts of windows. This evolved into designing landscape windows in the mid-1890s, which became her lifes work. Northrop was one of Tiffanys most important and longest employees, staying with the Studio until its close in 1936 and continuing its work with its successor firm, Westminster Studios, almost until her death at the age of 96. She had her own room within the Womens Department at Tiffany, and traveled with Tiffany on sketching vacations. His fame as a landscape window designer is due almost solely to Northrops talent. Julie L. Sloan, Stained-Glass Consultant, North Adams, MA

  • GBRGrande Bretagne
  • 2016-12-14
Prix ​​d'adjudication
Voir le prix
Annonce

A LOUIS XV ORMOLU-MOUNTED SEVRES PORCELAIN, TULIPWOOD, AMARANTH AND END-CUT MARQUETRY TABLE A CAFE

A LOUIS XV ORMOLU-MOUNTED SEVRES PORCELAIN, TULIPWOOD, AMARANTH AND END-CUT MARQUETRY TABLE A CAFE Circa 1761, by BVRB, stamped twice JME and inscribed Poirier md Rue St. Honoré à Paris, the plaque with Sèvres interlaced L's, date letter H for 1760 and painter's mark for Armand L'aîné. The top fitted with a soft-paste Sèvres porcelain tray of eared rectangular shape decorated with three exotic birds in a landscape, the borders with Wittelsbach trellis pattern reserves within gilt scrolled frames, the corners with floral bouquets, the porcelain with blue interlaced L's enclosing date letter H for 1760 and painter's mark of Armand L'aîné and incised mark BP, within a molded ormolu frame secured by scrolled foliate ormolu clasps, the waved sides with molded rim and acanthus-cast handles, with single drawer to the front lined in blue watered silk and inscribed in ink to the back Poirier Md Rue St. Honoré à Paris, the angle mounts cast with guilloche framed by acanthus sprays, on cabriole legs joined by a conforming rectangular top decorated with floral bois de bout marquetry reserve within Wittelsbach trellis parquetry border, on cabochon-encrusted acanthus-cast sabots, the drawer with printed label for 1955 New York Art Treasures Exhibition 1955, no 280, the undertier inscribed in paint 44 and with paper label inscribed Riera C./No. 5(?) (now crossed through), a further small label under the drawer indistinctly inscribed 11 or 14, with incised inscription 1877 Perrin, previously with castors, the plaque with small repair to one edge 26½in. (67.5cm.) high, 14½in. (36.5cm.) wide, 11in. (28cm.) deep

  • USAUSA
  • 2000-11-02
Prix ​​d'adjudication
Voir le prix

The Goldfish Pool at Chartwell

We are grateful to David Coombs for his kind assistance with the cataloguing of the present work. Painted in 1932, The Goldfish Pool at Chartwell is undoubtedly Churchill's masterpiece from the decade. Hung in pride of place above Lady Soames's mantelpiece in the Drawing Room at West House, the painting is a culmination of all that Churchill had learnt since first wielding a paint brush in 1915. Chosen by the artist to be illustrated in the first edition of Painting as a Pastime published in 1948, the painting is a striking manifestation of the artist at his very best. Capturing the spontaneous movement of vividly coloured golden orfe, the composition combines a masterly demonstration of Churchill's skill and talent in recreating the subtle reflections and texture of water whilst at the same time bringing to life a subject that was particularly dear to him. His grand-daughter Emma Soames recalls the Sunday ritual for all the grand-children of following their Grandpapa down to the pool to watch him feed the goldfish. Pied-piper like, they would proceed in single file behind him, across the stepping stones to his usual seat by the water-side where Churchill would tap his walking stick, stirring the goldfish to life. The pool was part of Churchill's extensive renovation of all the water features at Chartwell and became a particularly contemplative spot where he could be found feeding his beloved fish right up until the end of his life. Enthusiasm for the goldfish stretched across all generations: ‘Yesterday Papa and I walked round all the lakes, and in the round one below the pool there are about 1,000 little golden orfe! Isn’t it exciting? They are no bigger than this and pale goldy yellow in colour with here & there a touch of red. They look so sweet swimming about in the weeds. Papa is very much excited, as indeed we all are, and he says their existence is due to the horrible common tenches, pike etc, which would prey on them, having been killed…’ (Mary Soames, letter to Clementine Churchill, 1938, quoted in Mary Soames, A Daughter’s Tale, Doubleday, London, 2011, p.157). Unlike many of his landscapes at Chartwell which focus on a wide panorama of the impressive gardens, stretching out over the Weald of Kent, The Goldfish Pool is unusual in zooming right into the water itself taking in the luscious foliage along the water side. More than simply capturing a corner of the pond however, the picture is an exemplary essay in tonality, combining multiple hues of greens and browns to striking effect. The quality of handling is unparalleled within his oeuvre, Churchill's deft brush-strokes enlivening the water's surface, portraying the dynamic interplay of light, reflection and movement with great aplomb.

  • GBRGrande Bretagne
  • 2014-12-17
Prix ​​d'adjudication
Voir le prix

A PAIR OF GEORGE III GILTWOOD ARMCHAIRS

A PAIR OF GEORGE III GILTWOOD ARMCHAIRS Designed by Robert Adam and made by Thomas Chippendale Each with padded back, arms and seat covered in crimson floral damask, the shaped rectangular back framed with foliage-bound reeding, headed at the angles by paterae, the scrolled serpentine toprail centred by a pierced anthemion, the padded arms with scrolled foliate supports, the terminals with flowerheads, the padded serpentine-fronted seat above a deep seat-rail edged with a husk border carved with a shell issuing scrolling foliage ending in winged sphinxes, the sides with interlaced scrolls and sphinxes, the back with scrolls, on cabriole legs headed by anthemions suspending ribbon-tied wreaths, on hairy paw feet headed by a beaded girdle enclosing anti-friction castors, both chairs with incised constructional numerals, one chair numbered on the back of the front-rail 'I', the other numbered 'II', with two pairs of batten-holes front to back, the seat-rails raised and with large screw-holes in the centre of each seat-rail and at the top of each leg, with beechwood frames, seat-rail facings, frontrails and legs in limewood; chair 'I' with two oak and two beech cross-struts; re-gilt; chair 'II' with two mahogany and two beech cross-struts, the upper part of the pierced anthemion cresting possibly replaced; re-gilt (see page 33) 30¼ in. (77 cm.) wide overall; the seats 27 in. (68.5 cm.) wide; 41¾ in. (106 cm.) high; 30¼ in. (77 cm.) deep (2)

  • GBRGrande Bretagne
  • 1997-07-03
Prix ​​d'adjudication
Voir le prix

An Important "Dragonfly" Table Lamp from the Collection of Andrew Carnegie

Andrew Carnegie’s patronage of interior decorations and objects produced by Tiffany Studios is the foundational context for this extraordinary “Dragonfly” Table Lamp. The Scottish-American industrialist is famous for ushering in a modern era of production and expansion in the steel industry of the United States, however his interest in technology and art was also of paramount importance to his cultural and philanthropic endeavors. A shared love and fascination with nature accounted for Carnegie’s interest in the work of Louis Comfort Tiffany, especially in the realm of domestic interiors. His summer residence at Skibo Castle in the Scottish highlands as well as the historic residence at 2 East 91st Street in New York City (now the Cooper-Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum) were both characterized by abundant gardens, conservatories, and myriad floral arrangements that graced the interiors. Carnegie was fascinated by botany, an intellectual pursuit that was especially displayed in the context of his home with collections of intriguing, exotic plants and blossoming species that enchanted his guests. This interest was strongly paralleled in the lush gardens and collections of Louis Comfort Tiffany at his Laurelton Hall estate. In 1913, Carnegie commissioned a major work from the Tiffany Studios Ecclesiastical Department for a memorial stained glass window depicting a magnificent scene of natural beauty, originally intended for installation within the abbey church in his home town of Dunfermline, Scotland. Carnegie’s on-going patronage of Tiffany Studios was not limited to the ecclesiastical context, however, as period photographs and inventories of the Carnegie residence in New York City depict myriad designs produced by Tiffany in an array of popular models ranging across Turtle-Back tiled chandeliers, geometric as well as intricate floral leaded glass table lamps, Favrile blown glass objects, and most notably, the present offering of this extraordinary “Dragonfly” Table Lamp, which graced the Carnegie's Picture Gallery as seen in a period photograph of the room interior. The Carnegie Mansion on 91st Street was completed in 1903, which suggests that Andrew and Louise Carnegie commissioned these works from Tiffany Studios around this same time. The naturalistic glass selection in this shade speaks to a painterly sense of tone and texture, with rich coloration that suggests dragonflies fluttering before a saturated sunset sky of golden yellow hues and fiery orange tones below. The texture of the rippled background glass heightens its reference to aquatic settings associated with dragonflies, and provides a sense of fluid movement in the design. Cabochon jewels display a range of deep colors in vibrant red, orange, gold, and green that complement the warm coloration of the background as well as the tonal variation in the dragonflies themselves. The dragonflies around the circumference of the shade display a wide range of colors in the wings and spines in deep purple, greens, and warmer tones, which indicate that the glass selector in the design process was looking directly at natural  sources as well as period studies of entomology that showed variations in anatomical iridescence. This suggestion of tonal variation is only heightened when the shade is illuminated—a combination of art and technology that was beloved by Carnegie. Carnegie shared with Tiffany a passion for incorporating art into everyday life and objects, especially through an enthusiasm for marrying artistic representations of the natural world with technical innovations. This conceptual relationship is expressed profoundly in the present offering, a “Dragonfly” lamp that embodies the dual passion of art and technology through its natural iconography and bold use of electrification—a true illumination of Carnegie’s commitment to supporting and enjoying the work of contemporary artists in his time. The Carnegie Legacy Today The name Andrew Carnegie is as synonymous with philanthropy as it is with steel.  It immediately conjures up visions of grand libraries and one of the world’s most renowned music halls, but these images offer only a glimpse into the staggering depth and breadth of one incredible man’s efforts for the betterment of our global society.  Through his bequests, with which he disposed of his entire personal fortune, Carnegie founded twenty-two institutions, each with the goal of doing “real and permanent good in this world.” Education—one of Carnegie’s greatest passions—is at the core of his philanthropic work, with a particular emphasis on scientific and technical research.  His programs have fostered significant advancements in areas such as astronomy, genetics, medicine, and robotics, and they have also served to promote the visual and performing arts.  Today, such institutions as Carnegie Mellon University, the Carnegie Institute of Science, and the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching remain as pillars of the intellectual community.  Carnegie also established institutions that encourage and reward morality, honor, and ethics on both the individual and national levels, such as the Carnegie Hero Fund Commission, the Carnegie Hero Funds in Europe and the UK, and the Carnegie Council of Ethics in International Affairs.  Additionally, Carnegie advocated resolutely for world peace, endowing The Peace Palace in The Hague and founding the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace to continue his work. Remarkably, each one of these institutions has withstood a century of change and their work continues to dynamically influence society.  It is a profound testament to the farsighted vision of their benefactor who, with his boundless optimism and keen sense of direction, imbued them with flexible mandates, tacitly trusting in future generations to manage the gifts he had given. Stellar amongst his institutions is the Carnegie Corporation of New York, whose multi-faceted work is exemplary in growing the legacy of Carnegie’s passion and vision. In 2001, under the leadership of its president, Vartan Gregorian, the Carnegie Corporation drew together the family of 22 Carnegie institutions in commemoration of the philanthropic chapter of Carnegie’s life.  They have continued to meet biennially to award the prestigious Carnegie Medal of Philanthropy and to honor the extraordinary individuals and families of today who have followed Carnegie’s example through their own immense generosity.  Of Carnegie’s many achievements, certainly one of his greatest is the legacy of philanthropy he left behind. – Linda Thorell Hills, great-granddaughter of Andrew Carnegie Shade impressed TIFFANY STUDIOS NEW YORK/1507-27telescopic base impressed TIFFANY STUDIOS/397

  • USAUSA
  • 2015-12-16
Prix ​​d'adjudication
Voir le prix

A PAIR OF GEORGE III GILTWOOD SOFAS

A PAIR OF GEORGE III GILTWOOD SOFAS Designed by Robert Adam and made by Thomas Chippendale Each with a serpentine padded back, outscrolled arms, serpentine seat and four loose cushions covered in crimson floral damask, the serpentine scrolled cresting bordered with foliage-wrapped reeding and centred by a pierced anthemion cresting, the arms and seat edged with husks, the arms carved with anthemions ending in sunflower rosettes, the deep seat-rail carved with a central shell framed by gryphons and sphinxes framing the legs, the cabriole legs headed by anthemions issuing descending wreaths, on hairy-paw feet headed by beaded girdles enclosing friction castors, the sides with sphinxes and scrolling foliage centred by wreaths, the back-rail plain; with beechwood frames, seat-rail facings, frontrail and legs in limewood; one sofa numbered on the back of the front-rail 'IIII' the other 'II'; sofa 'IIII' with the inner back left-hand foot, back right-hand foot and inner front right-hand foot partially replaced, the cresting broken and re-attached, later blocks, re-gilt; sofa 'II' with four pairs of batten-holes front to back, two cramping slots, the inner back right-hand foot and the inner front left-hand foot partially replaced, later blocks and small section of right-hand back angle bracket 1¼ in. (3 cm.) missing, re-gilt (see page 33) 86 in. (218.5 cm.) wide; 45½ in. (116 cm.) high; 36 in. (91.5 cm.) deep (2)

  • GBRGrande Bretagne
  • 1997-07-03
Prix ​​d'adjudication
Voir le prix

Portrait of Sir Winston Churchill, half length, wearing a siren suit

'He [Churchill] looks tranquil and benign and, as such, very much reflected her [Mary's] image of her father' (Emma Soames, 2014) Churchill was one of the most photographed and painted figures of the twentieth century. Portraits by the leading artists of the day, including Lavery, Orpen and Sickert, have been so often reproduced that Churchill’s face as the pugnacious politician has come to be instantly recognizable. Sir Oswald Birley, on the other hand, chose to portray in this work, a more reflective side of Churchill in his seventy-seventh year. The portrayal is no less impressive or formidable, the keen intelligence and indomitable personality clear, but Birley has captured a certain serene dignity and tenderness as Churchill sits informally, tie removed wearing his signature siren suit. These suits were modelled on the boiler suits Churchill wore to lay bricks and he wore them casually both at Chartwell and at Chequers. This portrait was Lady Soames’s favoured painting of her father - her daughter Emma recently recalled: 'In a very prominent spot behind my mother's armchair hung her favourite portrait of her father, painted by Oswald Birley when Churchill was in his seventies. It is easy to understand why she loved it so much. He looks tranquil and benign and, as such, very much reflected her image of her father’ (Emma Soames, 2014). Birley first painted Churchill in June 1946 as a commission by the Speaker of the House of Commons to be hung at his residence at the Palace of Westminster. Churchill could be notoriously difficult about not just having his photo taken, but also sitting patiently for portraits, and Mary Soames recollects a tricky beginning to the sittings for the portrait which took place at Chartwell in the studio: ‘The relationship got off to a rather sticky start because Winston became awkward and did not want to be distracted from his own ploys… I was deputed to look after Captain Birley  and “organise” my father and the sittings.  There is a rather fussed entry in my diary for 14 June 1946: “I have spent today chasing Papa to sit for Mr B. – entertaining Mr B, and cooking …” Of course I lacked both my mother’s status and her courage – eventually, however, the sittings started, Oswald Birley’s quiet charm and my father’s respect for an artist soon melted away any difficulties, and I recorded with relief: “Found Mr B and Papa well-pleased with each other and the portrait.” And the following day: “Papa sat goodly all day”’ (Mary Soames, Winston Churchill His Life as a Painter, London, Collins, 1990, p.152). Churchill would dictate to his secratary during the sittings which usually lasted for two hours. This 1946 portrait remains in the collection of the Houses of Parliament and Birley went on to paint at least four further paintings of Churchill, one of which is the present work painted in 1950, a couple of years before Birley died. Signed and dated 1951

  • GBRGrande Bretagne
  • 2014-12-17
Prix ​​d'adjudication
Voir le prix

A GEORGE III EBONY-INLAID MAHOGANY SECRETAIRE LIBRARY BOOKCASE

A GEORGE III EBONY-INLAID MAHOGANY SECRETAIRE LIBRARY BOOKCASE Attributed to Thomas Chippendale, circa 1765 Of stepped breakfront outline, the central section with imbricated and ebony-veneered swan's neck cresting centered by a platform over a fiddleback mahogany cross-grained frieze, the central door with glazing bars centered by a foliate C-scroll cartouche suspended from husk chairs and within an arch and lozenge tablets, the side sections with pierced hexagon-pattern galleries and later draped urn ebony-inlaid finials over glazed doors of a similar arched and lozenge design headed by a clasp, the three doors enclosing mahogany-fronted shelves, the base with a secretaire drawer fitted with a baize-lined double ratchet easel and two mahogany-lined side drawers (one divided) over three long drawers all mounted with original foliate-cast gilt-lacquered handles, flanked by a pair of cut-corner cupboard doors, the whole inlaid in ebony with stylized foliate scrolls, and broad lines in geometric patterns of cut-corner and circular panels, with ebonized-molded base, the hinges of top drawer stamped H. TIBATS, and labeled G. JETLEY/24, BRUTON ST. BERKELEY SQ. WI, the central platform support and finials later, the underside of plinth with yellow wash over an apparently original red wash 99 in. (251.5 cm.) high, 79 in. (199.6 cm.) wide, 24½ in. (62.5 cm.) deep

  • USAUSA
  • 2010-10-21
Prix ​​d'adjudication
Voir le prix

* Veuillez noter que le prix ne correspond pas à la valeur d'aujourd'hui, mais uniquement à la devise au moment de l'achat.

Mobilier, Design & Miroirs

Différents types de mobiliers tel des canapés, commodes, chaises et miroirs ainsi que du mobilier de jardin mis en enchères sont regroupés dans cette catégorie. Ces ventes de mobilier incluent du mobilier ancien et moderne de divers styles et époques. Vous trouverez aussi dans cette catégorie du mobilier et des lampes design provenant de la Scandinavie, mais aussi du Royaume Uni, des États-Unis et de l’Italie fait par des designers connus dans le monde entier tel que Josef Frank, Arne Jacobsen, Ray et Charles Eames et Ludwig Mies van der Rohe. Tout simplement, vous trouverez des meubles pour tous les types de maisons.

image
L'objet du jour!
PORSCHE 964 CARRERA 3.8 RSR - 1993

Estimation basse: 1 000 000 EUR

Aimeriez-vous faire expertiser vos objets?

Envoyer des informations sur un objet valuation push image
Annonce