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  • 21 nov. 1989— 3 déc. 2018

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An American Revolutionary War Battleflag, 1776–1779

An American Revolutionary War Battleflag, 1776–1779, An American Revolutionary War Battleflag, 1776 - 1779 The color of the 2nd Continental Light Dragoons captured by Lieutenant Colonel Banastre Tarleton at Pound Ridge, Westchester County, New York on July 2, 1779. Together with the three further battleflags in the next lot, the last American Revolutionary War colors known to remain in British hands and the last such colors to remain in private hands anywhere. The  earliest surviving American flag of any kind with  a field of thirteen red and white stripes. One of the last great relics of the Revolution in private hands. The silk standard with a field of thirteen red and white stripes centered by a painted badge of a winged and fulminating thundercloud with ribbon-enclosed motto, the whole bordered on three sides with a wide silver metallic fringe. Stripes of red and white silk, pierced together with overlapping seams, compose the flag’s field. A further strip of red silk is joined to the hoist end of the flag where it forms a border through which four eyelets have been pieced through which cords would have secured the flag to its wooden lance. Small sections of the cord remain. Centering the flag and pierced into the field is a rectangle of painted fabric which displays within a gold and black border on a red ground a circular black thundercloud sustained on a pair of silver wings and from which dart ten gold and orange thunderbolts. Below the thundercloud and contained within a golden scrolling ribbon is the motto, painted in black, “PAT:A CONCITA  FULM:NT NATI.” The silver fringe, continuous on three sides, is bound to the flag with silk thread. Dimensions: Including fringe 35 1/8 inches (hoist) x 38 ¾ inches (fly) Excluding fringe 30 inches (hoist) x 36 inches (fly) Framed Design of the Battleflag: The earliest Revolutionary War flags were modifications of British flags. The stripes of the Union Jack were simplified into thirteen red and white stripes signifying the union of the thirteen states. On June 14, 1777, the Continental Congress passed a resolution for the creation of a national flag. “Resolved that the flag of the United States be thirteen stripes alternate red and white, that the Union be 13 stars white in a blue field representing a new constellation.” Perhaps the present flag predated this Congressional resolve; perhaps it drew its design from our national standard. The union of thirteen stripes appeared in the cantons of a number of Revolutionary War colors; however, as no examples of our national flag survive from the Revolutionary War period, this flag is the earliest surviving (and only Revolutionary era) American flag of any kind to use in its design a field of thirteen red and white stripes. The badge painted in the center of the flag has an ancient history. The winged thunder cloud raining thunderbolts evokes the terrible power of Zeus, the king of gods, and, as a device, appears on Ancient Greek coins, circa 500 B.C. The device was later adapted by the Romans, appearing on Roman Imperial coinage. The device was adapted for use by eighteenth-century French cavalry, which may have been the way in which it was transmitted to an American cavalry standard. The Latin motto below the badge can be roughly translated, “When their country calls, her sons answer in tones of thunder.” Dating the Flag : The Second Regiment, Continental Light Dragoons was authorized on December 12, 1776. Thus the flag could date as early as 1776, but no later than its capture on July 2, 1778. Further work needs to be done on the chronology of this flag with respect to the two other surviving Revolutionary colors of this regiment. These two, one at the Smithsonian Institution, the other at the Connecticut State Library, are more rudimentary in their design. The thirteen stripes have been relegated to a painted canton and the exploding thundercloud devices are painted with less detail and fewer highlights. The embellishment of the fine silver fringe is omitted from both these flags which are also slightly smaller than the flag captured by Tarleton. They could well be later flags, commissioned to replace the lost color of 1779, but, given the austerity of the times, completed with fewer flourishes.

  • USAUSA
  • 2006-06-14
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Bust of Peace

Antonio Canovas masterful Bust of Peace was last displayed in public over two hundred years ago when it was exhibited in the Royal Academy summer exhibition of 1817. Long thought lost, this rediscovered marble is of seminal importance within the oeuvre of Canova, the greatest Neoclassical sculptor. The Bust of Peace is the first of the sculptors celebrated Ideal Heads (Teste ideali) to have been received by a high ranking British aristocrat at the close of the Napoleonic Wars. It was the first such head to arrive in Britain and, by virtue of its subject, is symbolic of the peace established by the Great Powers after Waterloo. John Campbell, Lord Cawdor, was Canovas earliest British patron. He commissioned the Amorino (National Trust, Anglesey Abbey, inv. no. NT 516599) and the celebrated Cupid and Psyche (Musée du Louvre, Paris, inv. no. MR1777), both in 1787, and, in correspondence from that same year, Canova describes a bond of friendship between the two men beyond that of any other patron. Cawdor visited Canova in Rome in late 1814 and early 1815, at which time the sculptor is likely to have been formulating his plans to repatriate Romes great antiquities and paintings which had been confiscated by Napoleons armies and installed in the Louvre. Following Napoleons final defeat at Waterloo in June 1815, Canova was dispatched to Paris by Pope Pius VII with the task of negotiating the return of these artworks. He was followed by Cawdor in September 1815 and, on 9 September 1815, the two men met with Charles Long, art adviser to the Prince Regent, and Richard William Hamilton, Under-Secretary of State to Lord Castlereagh, the British Foreign Secretary. There can be little doubt that they discussed Canovas mission for, the next day, and despite considerable resistance from Talleyrand and Vivant Denon, Director of the Musée Royale at the Louvre, Canova put his case to King Louis XVIII. Shortly afterwards, with the backing of the Duke of Wellington and the Prince Regent, an agreement was reached for the artworks to be returned to Rome. Canova appears to have developed the concept of Ideal Heads (Teste ideali) with the specific purpose of gifting them to friends and patrons who had helped him in particular ways. He gave his first such bust, the Helen, conceived in 1811, to Countess Isabella Teotochi Albrizzi in 1812 (Palazzo Albrizzi, Venice), and another, the Clio, also executed 1811, to Luise Stolberg, Countess of Albany, who had commissioned Canova to execute the tomb of the poet Vittorio Alfieri (Musée Fabre, Montpellier). The Canova authority Hugh Honour has noted that, None of them were commissioned - most unusually for Canova - and he took advantage of the opportunity to escape from the restrictions of portraiture or of mythological and historical subject-matter to realise his elusive aesthetic ideal (Honour, 1995, op. cit.). As with the other Ideal Heads, the Bust of Peace must likewise have been presented as a gift by Canova to his friend. Lord Cawdor had been a steadfast patron throughout Canova's career and, despite the interval of the Napoleonic wars, had proven to be one of the sculptor's champions in Britain. He visited Canova's studio with the Duke of Bedford, at which time the Three Graces was commissioned (Victoria and Albert Museum, London, inv. no. A.4-1994; NGS, Edinburgh, inv. no. NG 2626), and later facilitated Canova's meeting with the Prince Regent. As is discussed below, Cawdor may also have been involved in securing the restitution of looted artworks to Rome. John Davies has confirmed that, 'amongst all other payments from Cawdor, there is no record at all of negotiation or payment for the Bust of Peace' (private correspondence). Moreover, the Bust of Peace was completed in 1814. Cawdor arrived in Rome only at the close of that year (he visited Canova's studio on 26 December 1814) and so could never have commissioned the bust. The fact that the sculptor apologises for a flaw in the marble in his letter of 8 July 1816 further goes to support the inevitable conclusion that the marble was presented gratis and not as a commission. Canovas Ideal Heads enshrine the sculptors idea of facial perfection. Informed by nature, they are removed from the idiosyncrasies of portraiture and guided by Classical principles. Carved in a state of amore caldissimo, the Ideal Heads transcend the corporeal and present a vision of universal beauty inspired by Canovas unique genius. The remarkable, almost ethereal, quality of the finished heads can be attributed to Canovas superb surface finish. This, however, appears to have been achieved solely by virtue of the sculptors skill as a marble carver, since he told Cawdor in March 1817 that some believe that I use a sort of encaustic paint on the marble of my finished sculpture, but of which crime I can no longer - for many years - be accused of. I challenge you to look and examine again the two statues of Hebe and Terpsichore, which were not treated with any wash, except that I passed over them a brush soaked in sandy water, which can be removed and washed off simply with a sponge (Canova to Cawdor 27 March 1817, published in Honour, Epistolario, op. cit., p. 219). The Ideal Heads can be broadly divided into three main subjects: mythological (including: Helen; A Vestal; the Muses Clio, Callipe and Erato); historical or literary figures (including: Lucrezia dEste; Laura; Beatrice; Sappho); and personifications (including: Peace; Gratitude; Philosophy). A fourth group exists of busts lacking identities. Canovas Bust of Peace symbolises the epoch. Presented by the artist to his friend and earliest British patron within months of Napoleons downfall, it represents, by virtue of its subject, the peace brought about by the Great Powers. Categorised as an Ideal Head by Missirini as early as 1824, and subsequently by Hugh Honour (private correspondence), the Bust of Peace has an added significance within the group, since it was the first Ideal Head to be presented to a British patron following Napoleons defeat. Cawdors meetings with Canova in Paris, alongside Hamilton and Long, further indicate that the bust may have given to his friend not merely for his loyalty as a patron but in thanks for his support in the campaign to restitute the confiscated artworks of the Papal States. In the very least the Bust of Peace, which was the first Ideal Head to arrive in Britain, is representative of Canovas gratitude, as Pope Pius VII's Plenipotentiary Minister, to the British for their role, alongside Russia and Prussia, in defeating Napoleon. Subsequently, in 1818, the four British dignitaries also present in Paris in the autumn of 1815, and who were instrumental in garnering support amongst the Great Powers for the restitution, were each presented with an Ideal Head by Canova. The Duke of Wellington received the Head of a Dancer (Apsley House, London) derived from the full figure Danzatrice con le mani sui franchi commissioned by Josephine Beauharnais circa 1802, completed 1811-12, later acquired by Emperor Alexander I of Russia, and now in the Hermitage Museum, St Petersburg; Viscount Castlereagh was gifted a Bust of Helen (Londonderry collection) after the aforementioned 1811 model given to Countess Isabella Teotochi Albrizzi; William Richard Hamilton was given an Ideal Head (Ashmolean Museum, Oxford, inv. no. WA1996.395) of the type alternately identified as Clio or Calliope first conceived as Clio for the Countess of Albany in 1811; and Sir Charles Long was sent an Ideal Head (Kimbell Art Museum, Fort Worth, inv. no. AP 1981.13) probably derived from the head of the Seated Muse Polymnia, which had originally been commissioned as Concorde by Elisa Baciocchi Bonaparte (Eustace suggests that the bust may be a portrait of Caroline Murat, op. cit., p. 81). Three of the busts were first recorded in the Notizie del Giorno, 24 September 1818, shortly after their arrival in England: tre teste di donne di squisto lavoro, una al duca di Wellington, altra a lord Castlereagh, ed altra allonorevole Charles Longh (as quoted in Eustace, op. cit., p. 66). Eustace has noted that Pius VII, in a letter to the Duke of Wellington, had promised to show his thanks for Britains role in the return of looted artworks, and has concluded that the busts may have been intended as official or semi-official gifts (op. cit., p. 66). Canovas Ideal Heads caused a stir when they arrived in Britain. Charles Long was unrestrained in his enthusiasm and gratitude for the gift. In October 1818 he wrote to Canova: Je nattenderai plus long temps de vous remercier pour le Cade[au] que vous avez eu la bonté de menvoyer - elle est tout a fait gracieuse et elegante - tous les Connoisseurs, (et beaucoup lont vu) lamire extremement, et la trouvent parmi les plus jolies de vos ouvrages. je ne sais pas comment vous ... faire assez mes remerciments, pour avoir destiné cette ouvrage pourmoi mais je vous prie bien de croire quil ny a personne qui sait mieux lapprecier ... (Charles Long, Whitehall, 6 October 1818, as quoted in Eustace, op. cit., p. 82). Remarkably, the progenitor of Castlereaghs Helen, the aforementioned bust presented to Countess Albrizzi in 1811, was the subject of a poem by Lord Byron, whose eloquent lines convey the intrinsic timelessness Canovas Ideal Heads: In this belovèd marble view Above the works and thoughts of Man, What Nature could but would not, do, And beauty and Canova can! Beyond Imaginations power, Beyond the Bards defeated art, With Immortality her dower, Behold the Helen of the heart George Gordon, Lord Byron, On the Bust of Helen by Canova, 1816 Recently, the original final plaster version of the Bust of Peace was discovered in the Museo civico, Bassano del Grappa, by Prof. Mario Guderzo, Director of the Museo Canova and Gipsoteca canoviana in Possagno. The pointed plaster bust was donated to the museum by Canovas half brother Abbate Giambattista Sartori-Canova (1775-1858). Two further plasters of the model were listed in Canova's studio after his death, one of which is lost, the other destroyed. A further untraced plaster bust was cast by Canova and presented to the wife of Richard Long, Amelia Hume, in 1817 (1762-1837) (see letter between Canova and Cawdor, 6 September 1817, published in Honour, Epistolario, op cit., pp. 127-128). The accounts of the plasterer Vincenzo Malpieri dating to 6 September 1817 show that the cast of the Bust of Peace cost 7,20 scudi, substantially more than casts of Hamiltons Muse at 4,20 scudi, Wellingtons Ballerina at 3,60 scudi and Castlereaghs 'Elena di parigi' at a mere 2,40 scudi; the price differential is not explained (see accounts of Vincenzo Malpieri published in Honour, Epistolario, op cit., p. 1191). Count Nikolai P. Rumyantsev and the Commission of the Statue of Peace Canova had first been approached to sculpt a statue of Peace by the Russian Foreign Minister and Chancellor Count Nikolai Petrovich Rumyantsev (Romansov) (1754-1826) in 1811 (although he had developed the concept as early as 1805; see Praz, op. cit., p. 123). The Romanzov family had a long and distinguished history as peacemakers. Count Nikolais father, the great military commander Pyotr Alexandrovich Rumyantsev-Zadunaisky (1725-1796), had forced the Ottoman Sultan to sue for peace during the First Russo-Turkish War in 1774, whilst his grandfather Count Alexander Ivanovich Rumyantsev had concluded the Treaty of Abo in 1743, ending the Russo- Swedish War of 1741-1743. A Francophile and a Russian patriot, Count Nikolai Rumyantsev was a supporter of the Treaty of Tilsit on 7 July 1807, which established peace between Russia and France, and, in 1808, he concluded the peace which bound Swedish Finland to Russia. In 1809 he had made a peace proposal with Britain to avoid war. His commission for a statue of peace in 1811 was intended to serve as a memorial to his familys role as peacemakers in Europe. It came at a time when Canovas reputation in Russia was approaching its zenith. The sculptor was even offered to relocate to Russia, but he declined, saying Italy...is my country - is the country and native soil of the arts (Memes, op. cit., pp. 468-478). A terracotta bozzetto exists for the Statue of Peace in the National Gallery of Scotland (Clifford, et al., op. cit., no. 24). Interestingly, having been gifted by Canova to his friend Mary Berry, circa 1820-1821, this entered the collection of the Earls of Carlisle at Castle Howard in 1853, the family of Lord Cawdors wife Caroline Isabella. An early unfired clay bozzetto of different composition exists at Possagno (inv. no. 225), together with two plaster bozzetti thought to date to circa 1811 which broadly show the final composition (inv. nos. 227 and 228). The large scale finished plaster shows the pointing markers used for the execution of the marble and is incised: Finita in 7bre 1812 (this dating further indicates that Canova was referring to the present bust in his letter to Quatremère de Quincy on 17 August 1814 when he confirms completion of the Statue of Peace). Due to the hostilities between Russia and the French Empire in the intervening period, the Statue of Peace was only finished in 1815, and delivered to Saint Petersburg in November 1816. The statue is now in the Varvara and Bogdan Chanenko Museum, Kiev (inv. no. 204). Canovas student Demut-Malinovskiy (1776-1846) cast a bronze version of the statue entitled: Monument to Ecaterine II in 1834, now in the Shchusev Museum of Architecture, Moscow. A further cast was made for the funerary monument to Count Nikolai Rumyantsev, who sadly fell out of favour with the Tsar towards the end of his life (now Petrikov Ethnographic Museum, Gomel; see Grabar, op. cit., p. 241). Swathed in classical drapery, Peace is supported by a truncated column onto which is inscribed the names of the peace treaties secured by the Rumyantsev family. She is winged, crowned with a diadem, holds a staff in one hand, and, with her right leg, tramples upon the serpent of war. According to Canova, the composition is derived from a Claudian medal (Cicognara, op. cit., pp. 227-229). The head of Peace is stylistically and compositionally very close to the head of La Concordia (Galleria Nazionale, Parma), which had been conceived circa 1809-1814 as a portrait of the Empress Marie-Louise (Clifford, et al, op. cit., no. 23). Significantly, the present Bust of Peace of 1814 predates the completion of the full figure marble, completed in 1815. When Count Rumyantsevs full figure Statue of Peace arrived in Saint Petersburg in 1816, it must surely have symbolised Russias role in bestowing peace upon the war torn European continent. Entering Paris on 30 March 1814, the Tsar Alexander I had declared: I come to bring you peace and commerce. After Napoleon's invasion of Russia in 1812 Rumyantsev had continued to push for peace and Napoleon expected to negotiate peace after the Battle of Borodino in October 1812, but Alexandre I was silent; Moscow fell to the French only weeks afterwards. Alexander I is quoted as saying 'The Army underrated Rumanzev [sic] who does not advise submission to Napoleon, and I greatly respect him' (Joyntville, op. cit., p. 185). In 1812 Ataman Platov said that 'Rumanzev [sic] would prove an enemy of his country and a servant of France' (Joynville, op. cit., p. 185). Russia allied herself with Britain in 1812, and the Tsar travelled to London in 1814. Upon his return, on 14 July 1814, he accepted the resignation of Rumyantsev. Aside from disagreements with the Tsar on Russia's diplomatic strategy, Rumyantsev's failing health had proven to be a handicap and it was one of the reasons why he did not accompany Alexander I to the Congress of Vienna. Affairs of State aside, the Tsar and Rumyantsev were bound together by their shared literary and scientific tastes. A progressive, Rumyantsev sought to promote education amongst the wider Russian population. He gave up all the presents he received from foreign princes for the benefit of the wounded, and he refused to accept the pension Alexander I had assigned to him. His philanthropy allowed the publication of the Russian "Codex Deplomaticus" printed in Moscow in 1813, as well as a Russian translation of the "History of the Mongols and Tartars" in 1814. In 1817-18, he made several journeys to collect historical manuscripts. He formed a museum of oriental medals and coins and he made financial donations to the Academy of Sciences to print and publish ancient Russian records (see Joynville, op. cit., pp.110-113). Canova's Bust of Peace: An Exceptional Marble Autograph marbles by Antonio Canova are extremely rare at auction. Canova was the ultimate master of marble carving, his works form the cornerstones of the most important European sculpture collections around the world, from the Louvre to the Hermitage, from Chatsworth to the Victoria and Albert Museum. The rediscovered Bust of Peace is a work of unique beauty and seminal importance within Canova's corpus of busts. Symbolic of peace, she represents the end of the Napoleonic era and the artist's sense of optimism at the burgeoning new age of European politics. Her remarkable history, given to the sculptor's earliest British patron and one of his closest friends, exhibited at the Royal Academy and then lost from the public eye for over two hundred years, is as poetic as the marble is beautiful. The sale of the Bust of Peace represents a unique opportunity to acquire one of the finest and last Ideal Heads in private hands. Essays Canova's Bust of Peace is discussed in two essays, respectively by Professor Mario Guderzo, Director of the Museo Canova and Gipsoteca Canoviana, Possagno, and Dr John Davies, Former Head of the Carmarthenshire Archives Service at the Welsh National Archives. Dr Davies is the author of the forthcoming volume: 'Changing Fortunes: The Cawdors, a British aristocratic family, 1689-1976.' These essays are available upon request. Summaries of the essays can be found below: Queen of the World: Peace by Antonio Canova for Lord Cawdor Professor Mario Guderzo The genesis for Canova's Bust of Peace lies in Count Nikolai Rumyantsev's commission for a Statue of Peace to commemorate treaties signed by himself, his father and grandfather. The Bust of Peace dates to 1814. Canova used his characteristic method to create the bust. Three plaster versions of the Bust of Peace are recorded. One at the Museo di Bassano, a second at the Gipsoteca in Possagno (severely damaged) and a third (lost). Guderzo then outlines Canova's method: conceiving his models in clay and then casting them in plaster, before executing the marble. A glossary in order of the process is provided, outlining Canova's sculptural practice. The first stage was drawing, followed by a clay bozzetto, followed by the plaster cast, followed by a clay model of actual size. A plaster mould was taken, the clay would be destroyed, and a plaster model to actual size cast. Pointing markers would thence be added, from which the marble would be roughed out to scale by a highly experienced artisan. Canova would intervene at the final stage, elevating the marble to a state of 'exquisite perfection' according to Cicognara. Guderzo discusses Canova's brother's donation to the Museo di Bassano and the place of the plaster model of the Bust of Peace within this important collection. John Campbell, First Baron Cawdor (1755-1821): Patron, Collector and Connoisseur Dr John E. Davies Cawdor Castle was the principal seat of the Campbell's of Cawdor until 1689, at which time Stackpole Court in Pembrokeshire was added their estates through marriage. John Campbell, 1st Baron Cawdor was one of the largest British landowners and an Italophile who visited Italy on several occasions. His art dealer Henry Tresham probably introduced Campbell to Canova in 1787, with whom he struck a strong and lifelong friendship. Campbell commissioned the Amorino from Canova in 1787 and the Cupid and Psyche two years later. Campbell married Caroline Howard, daughter of the 5th Earl of Carlisle in 1790 and leased a house on Oxford Street where he amassed an antiquities collection. The house and contents were sold due to financial worries in 1800. In 1814 Campbell travelled to Rome, dining with Canova daily, including on Christmas day. In 1815 he records seeing Canova working on the Hebe and Statue of Peace (Rumyantsev's full size marble) in his studio. He arrived in Paris on 6 September 1816 and met with Canova who was lobbying to secure the return of Italian artworks looted by Napoleon. Canova gifted the Bust of Peace to Cawdor in gratitude for his support in this task and his long term patronage. Ideal Heads were later gifted to Charles Long, Castlereagh, William Hamilton and the Duke of Wellington. Campbell moved at the highest levels in British society, though his collecting habits were curtailed by financial restraints. Stackpole was demolished in 1962 subsequent to the sale of its contents, including the Bust of Peace. RELATED LITERATURE L. Cicognara, Biografia di Antonio Canova : aggiuntivi I. II catalogo completo delle opere del Canova, II. Un saggio delle sue lettere familiari, III. La storia della sua ultima malattia scritta dal dott. Paola Zannini, Venice, 1823; M. Missirini, Della vita di Antonio Canova, Libri quattro, Prato, 1824; S. Memes, Memoires of Antonio Canova with a Critical Analysis of his Works and an Historical View of Modern Sculpture, Edinburgh, 1825; A. Graves, The Royal Academy of Arts: a complete dictionary of contributors and their work from its foundation in 1769 to 1904, London, 1906; H. Honour, A. Canova and the AngloRomans, Connoisseur, vol.143, 1959, pp. 2415; vol.144, 1959, pp. 22531; H. Honour, Canovas Studio Practice, Burlington Magazine, vol.114, 1972, pp. 14659, 21429; G. Pavanello, Lopera completa del Canova, Milan, 1976; I. Wardropper and T. F. Rowlands, Antonio Canova and Quatremère de Quincy: the Gift of Friendship, Art Institute of Chicago Museum Studies, vol.15(1), 1989, pp. 3844; H. Honour, A Bust of Sapphoby Antonio Canova, Artibus et historiae, vol.24, 1991, pp. 193200; T. Clifford, H. Honour, J. Kenworthy-Browne, Iain Gordon Brown and A. Weston-Lewis, The Three Graces, exh. cat. National Gallery of Scotland, Edinburgh, 1995; H. Honour, An Ideal Head by Canova, Sothebys Preview, London, December 1995; H. Honour, Canovas Amorini for John Campbell and John David La Touche, Antol. B. A., vols.4851, 1994, pp.12939; H. Honour (ed.), Epistolario (1816-1817), Salerno, 2003; A. Coliva and F. Mazzocca, Canova e la Venere Vincitrice, exh. cat, Galleria Borghese, Rome, 2007; I. Roscoe, E. Hardy and M. G. Sullivan, A Biographical Dictionary of Sculptors in Britain, 1660-1851, New Haven and Yale, 2009; S. Androssov, F. Mazzocca and A. Paolucci, Canova. L'ideale classico tra scultura e pittura, exh. cat., Museo San Domenico, Forlì, 2009; M. Guderzo, Antonio Canova: Sculture, dipinti e incisioni dal Museo e dalla Gipsoteca di Possagno, exh. cat., Palazzo Monte Frumentario, Assisi, 2013; S. Androssov, Museo Statale Ermitage. La scultura italiana dal XVII e XVIII secolo. Da Bernini a Canova. Catalogo della Collezione, cat. Hermitage Museum, St Petersburg, Milan, 2017

  • GBRGrande Bretagne
  • 2018-07-04
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Three American Revolutionary War Battleflags, 1778–1780

Three American Revolutionary War Battleflags, 1778–1780, Three American Revolutionary War Battleflags, 1778–1780 The complete stand of three colors of the 3rd Virginia Detachment, under the command of Colonel Abraham Buford, captured by Lieutenant Colonel Banastre Tarleton at the Battle of Waxhaws, Waxhaws, South Carolina, on May 29, 1780. Together with the battleflag in the previous lot, the last American Revolutionary War colors known to remain in British hands and the last such colors to remain in private hands anywhere. This regimental flag and its matching grand division colors form the only intact stand of regimental colors known to have survived from the Revolution. The earliest surviving documented American flag of any kind bearing thirteen stars. The earliest surviving documented American flag designed, as is our national flag, with a canton of stars. The earliest surviving documented American flag containing, as does our national flag, five-pointed stars. Among the last great relics of the Revolution in private hands. THE REGIMENTAL COLOR. The silk gold-yellow field well-painted on both sides with the device of a beaver felling a palmetto over the motto “PERSEVERANDO” and inset on the upper hoist and with a blue silk canton containing thirteen silver five-pointed stars. The flag is composed of three equal widths of yellow silk seamed together, to the upper hoist end of which has been pieced a canton of blue silk into which have been inserted thirteen silver tin-glazed five-pointed stars, arranged as a triangle of three stars within a circle of eight stars, with two further stars at the upper left and right corners of the canton. Whether the beaver and palmetto were centered between its hoist and fly end of the color is uncertain as a portion of its fly end has been cut away and is missing. If the images were centered then as much as 17 inches of its fly end is missing. If it were not (as is the case with other colors where a canton was part of the design) then the missing portion would be as little as five or six inches. Dimensions: 50 ¼ inches (hoist) x 45 3/8 inches (fly) Framed THE YELLOW "GRAND DIVISION" COLOR. The gold-yellow field composed of three strips of silk sewn together and on the hoist folded back to create a pole sleeve. The color is centered on both sides with a painted scrolling white ribbon highlighted with green containing the word “Regiment.” Self-fringed on the fly end. Dimensions: Including fringe 44 ½ inches (hoist) x 44 inches (fly) Excluding fringe 44 ½ inches (hoist) x 42 inches (fly) Framed THE BLUE "GRAND DIVISION" COLOR. The sky blue silk field composed of two sections of silk sewn together and folded back on the hoist end to create a pole sleeve. Centering both sides of the color is a painted scrolling white ribbon, highlighted in pink, containing the word “Regiment.” The fly end is self-fringed. Dimensions: Including fringe 40 ¾ inches (hoist) x 43 ¾ inches (fly) Excluding fringe 40 ¾ inches (hoist) x 42 ½ inches (fly) Framed  Design of the main Regimental Flag: The regimental flag in this stand of colors is lushly painted on both sides with the device of a broad-tailed and bear-like beaver gnawing through the trunk of a palmetto tree. A stream flows by and on the grassy verge are broad-leaved water plants. Forming a lower border to this tableau is a scrolling ribbon containing the Latin word “Perseverando.” How this beaver and tree metaphor for the virtue of persistence in overthrowing tyranny reached the designers and flag-makers of this color is clear. When it became necessary for this new nation to create its own paper currency, Benjamin Franklin was invited to select appropriate motifs to be engraved on the new Continental bills. He consulted his 1702 edition of Joachim Camerarius's Symbolorum ac emblematum for suitable motifs. For the six dollar bill he chose an emblem signifying perseverance. The six dollar bill, albeit in the roughest form, included also almost all the elements of the present flag’s device: the beaver, palmetto, riverbank, and motto. This transference of emblems from patriotic currency to patriotic flags is conclusively demonstrated by an important Revolutionary War survival. This is Major Jonathan Gostelowe’s inventory, known as “Gostelowe’s Return,” which described in detail thirteen new stands of regimental colors held in his Continental Army Commissary stores in Philadelphia during the summer of 1778. This regimental color is described along with others for which there are no complete surviving examples. But all the described flags have in common devices drawn from Continental currency. The artist of this flag – who, perhaps, in quieter times, painted tavern signs and carriages – elaborated considerably on the rudimentary six dollar image. The beaver is large and robust. The palmetto flourishes but is doomed. To enclose this motto the artist has added a scrolling ribbon. The Union of Stars: The most remarkable aspect of this flag is the sky blue canton containing thirteen inset tin-glazed five-pointed stars. This is the most extraordinary survival of all. While the “Gostelowe Return” describes all thirteen flags bearing unions of stars, of the three likely survivors of the Return (in addition to the 3rd Virginia Detachment they are the “Headman Color” and the “Fort Washington Color”) only this one still retains the canton of stars. The appropriate arrangement of thirteen stars was a particular challenge for eighteenth-century flag-makers. The arrangement of stars in this flag is especially complex and unique among eighteenth-century flags. A circle of eight stars surrounds a triangle of three stars. In each of the upper corners of this canton are two further stars. The inspiration for this arrangement may well have been the Continental Congress’s resolution of 1777 establishing a national flag. The resolution calls for “13 stars white in a blue field representing a new constellation.” That phrase resonates. As our country was the latest nation among the nations of the Earth, so were the stars of our flag a new constellation among the stars in heaven. Was the designer of this flag creating his own version of a “new constellation”? The arrangement of stars is complex and intriguing. In any event this spatially complex design was difficult for a flag-maker to compose with scissors, thread, and paint and was never used again. There are three other Revolutionary War period flags with a canton of thirteen stars. But they all either postdate this flag or are undocumented. Dating the Colors: In the summer of 1778 Major Jonathan Gostelowe, a Commissary of Military Stores for the Continental Army, drew up an inventory of “New Standards and Divisionary Colors” available in his stores in Philadelphia. The “Gostelowe Return," as it came to be known, lists thirteen regimental standards, one of which is identical to the present flag. However, that flag is described as being accompanied by blue and red division colors, not blue and yellow. It is possible that the present flag was “new” in 1778. Certainly the design dates from no later than 1778. As all three colors were made of matching silk, they all must date from the same point in time.

  • USAUSA
  • 2006-06-14
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[WATSON, James Dewey]. Nobel Prize Medal in Medicine or Physiology for his work on the discovery of DNA’s structure. 23 carat gold, 66 mm diameter (ap

[WATSON, James Dewey]. Nobel Prize Medal in Medicine or Physiology for his work on the discovery of DNA’s structure. 23 carat gold, 66 mm diameter (approx. 2 5/8 in.). Profile bust of Alfred Nobel facing left on obverse, with “ALFR. NOBEL” at left and his dates in Roman numerals at right, signed along lower left edge (incuse) “E. LINDBERG 1902”, reverse with allegorical vignette showing the figure of Science unveiling Nature, signed at right “E. LINDBERG”, legend “INVENTAS VITAM IUVAT EX COLUISSE PER ARTES” around edge, “J. D. WATSON / MCMLXII” engraved below on plaque, with caption “REG UNIVERSITAS – MED CHIR CAROL” on either side of the plaque; rim marked “GULD 1950” (Kungliga Mynt och Justeringsverket [Swedish Royal Mint]); housed in original red morocco gilt case, interior lined in tan suede and satin. Prior to 1980 the Nobel Prize medal was made from 23 carat gold, but since then Nobel Prize medals are made of 18 carat green gold plated with 24 carat gold. The diameter of the Nobel Prize medal is 66 mm but the weight and thickness varies with the price of gold. The average Nobel Prize medal is 175 g with a thickness ranging from 2.4-5.2 mm. Both sides of most of the categories of Nobel medals are the same, showing the image of Alfred Nobel and the years of his birth and death. However, the verso of the Physiology or Medicine medal is different (as here), depicting the goddess of medicine quenching the thirst of a sick girl. The medals for Physics, Chemistry, Physiology or Medicine and Literature were modeled by the Swedish sculptor and engraver Erik Lindberg (1873-1966). According to his will, the Swedish inventor Alfred Nobel established the prizes in 1895, and the prizes in Physics, Chemistry, Physiology or Medicine, Literature, and Peace were instituted in 1901. (The related Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Sciences was created in 1968.) While the initial five prizes are awarded in Stockholm, the Nobel Peace Prize is presented in Oslo. The Nobel Prize is widely regarded as the most prestigious award available in the fields of literature, medicine, physics, chemistry, peace, and economics. The Nobel Prizes in Physics, Chemistry, and Economic Sciences are awarded by the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences; the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine is awarded by the Nobel Assembly at Karolinska Institutet; the Nobel Prize in Literature is awarded by the Swedish Academy; and the Nobel Peace Prize is awarded by the Norwegian Nobel Committee. Awarded annually, each laureate receives a gold medal, a diploma and a sum of money, which is decided by the Nobel Foundation. In 1962, the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine was awarded jointly to Francis Harry Compton Crick, James Dewey Watson and Maurice Hugh Frederick Wilkins “for their discoveries concerning the molecular structure of nucleic acids and its significance for information transfer in living material.” Maurice Wilkins’s colleague Rosalind Franklin (1920–1958), whose data and research using X-ray diffraction images of DNA were essential to Crick and Watson’s determining its structure and formulating their double-helical model, died of cancer at the age of 37, and was therefore not so honored because the Nobel Prize cannot be shared by more than three scientists, nor can it be awarded posthumously.

  • USAUSA
  • 2014-12-04
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1880 $4 Stella Coiled Hair Cameo PF-67 NGC

1880 $4 Stella Coiled Hair Cameo PF-67 NGC George T. Morgan, designer (attributed) Obverse: Head of Liberty facing left, wearing diadem inscribed LIBERTY, her hair braided and tightly coiled on top of her head; around, ★6★G★.3★S★.7★C★7★G★R★A★M★S★; below, 1880. Reverse: Large five-pointed star inscribed in incuse: ONE / STELLA / — / 400 / CENTS, in five lines; around outer rim: UNITED STATES OF AMERICA — FOUR DOL.; around, within outer legend: E – PLURIBUS – UNUM — DEO – EST – GLORIA. Condition: NGC Proof 67 Cameo (Certificate number: 1963260-004 – Photo Proof 10-07; previous Photo Proof 04-05 [number 1916321-002]: "NGC has certified just one other as PF67 Cameo and none finer"). A rich yellow-red color with exceptional frosting of the devices over deeply mirrored surfaces. A minimal lint mark to the right of the second 7 on the obverse, and a small (mint-caused) line ascending from the upper left point of the star between .7 and C are two hallmarks to identify this specimen. An amazing example which is virtually unimprovable. References: This Coin Published: Breen (Proofs) p. 167 (8); Akers (1976) p. 82; Akers (Patterns) pp. 53, 104; Garrett & Guth (Encyclopedia) p. 170 ("One of the finest pieces known for the issue..."), 570; A Guide Book to United States Coins (The Red Book), 59th ed., 2006, pp. 233, 399; 66th ed., 2013, pp. 252, 423; this piece used to illustrate the type on the NGC Coin Explorer website. Other references: Judd 1660; Pollack 1860; Breen (Encyclopedia) 6411; Garrett & Guth, 100 Greatest U.S. Coins. (PCGS 88060) Condition Census: Tied for finest known. NGC records only two other examples as Proof 67 Cameo, none finer; PCGS records none graded this perfectly preserved (Proof 64+ Cameo and Proof 66 without the cameo designation, the finest). (07-13) Rarity: Exceptionally rare. One of the classic rarities of the entire United States series. Although the precise mintage records are thus far lost, the consensus of researchers is that no more than ten to fifteen were produced, with nearly ten surviving examples (though the Red Book cites only eight) having been confirmed (without duplication of listing); Teichman (U.S. Patterns website) lists nine confirmed examples including the Smithsonian example (the presently offered lot is his number 2). According to the PCGS records of auction appearances this is the finest certified piece ever sold at auction, and according to Guth & Garrett is finer than the Smithsonian coin by three full points. According to the 2006 Red Book, this coin when last sold at auction realized a price within the top-20 all-time U.S. coin prices ever realized up to that time, its price only exceeded by such iconic rarities as the 1933 Double Eagle, 1804 Dollar, 1913 Liberty Head Nickel, Brasher Doubloon, and 1894-S Dime. Provenance: Gold Rush Collection, Heritage, January 12, 2005, lot 30044, PR66 Cameo NGC, "an exceptional cameo proof," (but incorrectly identified in the census as example 2 or 5 [Kern or DuPont]; it is example 3), ($977,500); Stack's Fixed Price List, Summer 1997 as part of a complete set ($875,000); Winner F. Delp Collection, Stack's, November 17, 1972, lot 792 ($35,000). Note: The Coiled Hair design has long been attributed to George T. Morgan, and a close comparison of the two designs clearly defines the hands of two different engravers. Charles Barber, succeeded his father, William as the sixth Chief Engraver of the Mint in 1879. He was, by almost universal agreement, technically gifted but a lackluster artist. Morgan, an Englishman, by comparison, was recommended for the assistant engraver's post precisely because of his artistic gifts, which were amply displayed in his series of pattern half dollars in 1877 and 1878, and of course his well-known silver dollar. Here the coiled hair design is not only treated with greater naturalism than Barber's flowing hair design (even the pupil of Liberty's eye is delineated), but the design itself is more sophisticated. The braided plait on top of Liberty's head is delicately and intricately engraved, and the portrait of Liberty is fully modeled and has a distinct individual personality. By contrast, the flowing hair design presents a more distant, cool effigy of Liberty with her hair more heavily engraved, both aspects of which are more in keeping with Barber's well-established use of classical sculpture for his inspiration. David Akers also noted that there may be an aura of mystery surrounding the issue of 1880 Coiled Hair Stellas. In his extensive examination of examples during his long career, he noticed that the issue came with two distinctly different finishes. The first group (as displayed on this specimen and that in the Smithsonian, for example) has frosted devices and mirrorlike fields; those of the second variety are effectively brilliant proofs with little if any cameo contrast (indeed, Akers states that they appear polished). He suggested that one variety, probably the first group (as the Smithsonian's example bears these features) may be original strikes, and the other re-strikes, but there is no data thus far known which would support such a conjecture. Suffice it to say, as Akers did, "this stella remains the rarest of the four." In fact, the 1880 Coiled Hair Stella has long been thought of as the 'great white whale' of the four coin series, and while the voracious collector Virgil Brand is known to have owned more than one example, it eluded even such great and sophisticated collectors as T. Harrison and John Work Garrett, the Norwebs, and Harry Bass.

  • USAUSA
  • 2013-09-24
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Important, Fresh and Extremely Significant Middle Eastern Treasure:

Important, Fresh and Extremely Significant Middle Eastern Treasure: 15th Century Shirt of Mail and Plate with Elaborate Gold Koftgari Decorated Plate Reinforcement with the Property Stamp from the Janissary Arsenal at the Hagia Irene Church in Istanbul with Inscription that Appears to Bear the name of the Recipient: Qaytbay Mamluk Sultan of Egypt 1468-1496 Reported to be one of two known and identified Qaytbay shirts of plate and mail and the only one available in private circulation, the other shirt is housed in Topkapi Armoury Museum in Istanbul. Qaytbay was the 18th Burji Mamluk Sultan of Egypt (other translations of his name include Qaitbay and Kait Bey). Known for his martial prowess fighting approximately 16 military campaigns and was a prolific builder with some 85 structures attributed to him in Mecca, Medina, Jerusalem, Damascus, Aleppo, Alexandria and Cairo. Under the Sultan Qaybay the Circassian Mamluks experienced a cultural revival. As Sultan he reigned from 1468 through 1496, a record broken only by al-Nasir Mohammed. Qaytbay's monument which was built between 1472 and 1474 AD is featured on the Egyptian One Pound Note. This type of mail and plate shirt was used throughout eastern Anatolia, Persia, and the Caucasus, plated mail was an evolution of both earlier chain and lamellar designs, and would become one of the de-facto standards of personal armor until finally rendered obsolete by the firearm reaching maturity. Measuring roughly 18 inches across the shoulder with a set of 20 inch sleeves and a length of 30 inches down the back, the overall pattern of the chain is a "4 to 1" arrangement, with each ring being woven through the four rings immediately next to it, for an ideal balance of strength to weight, with this example weighing in at approximately 25.15 pounds. Additionally, the core of the pattern is an arrangement of one solid-forged ring with a ribbed surface surrounded by four smooth riveted rings, which would give greater overall strength than using riveted rings for the entire construction, as well as a single thickness of solid forged ribbed brass rings forming the edge trim. Additionally, both front and rear feature iron plate reinforcement, with a series of 28 rectangular panels protecting an 11 1/2 inch high and 23 1/2 inch wide area of the midsection on the front, and 59 panels protecting a 21 inch tall and 17 1/4 inch wide area of the back on the rear. The front of the armor is open, with a set of three leather tie-down closures. The back panels are arranged into five columns, with the thin central column contoured to follow the natural concave of the spine region and the columns connected by a 3-link wide chain segment, and the front arranged in four columns and curved to follow the chest, with a similar arrangement between columns. Both front and back are extensively decorated with gold koftgari, with a repeating sequence of circular border patterns surrounding panels of floral and geometric designs, as well as untranslated writing. Additionally, the plates are configured to overlap vertically, with the lower plates covering the bottom edges of the plates above them; though no specific information or documentation was included with the armor, this overlap suggests issue to a cavalryman or similar mounted soldier, as it would make it harder for a man on foot to find a gap in the armor to insert a spear or sword. On the interior of the plates a small stamped marking is present; research indicates this is a property/inventory mark from the Hagia Irene. Originally established by Emperor Constantine I as one of three great shrines in Constantinople (later Istanbul), Hagia Irene (aka Saint Irene's) was converted into an arsenal after the city fell to the forces of Memed II in the 15th century. In addition to being used as an arsenal, Hagia Irene was also a storehouse and collection point for Ottoman war loot, eventually evolving into a military museum. The Hagia Irene stands to this day, serving as a museum and concert hall. Manufacturer: None Model: None BBL: Stock: Gauge: Finish: Grips: Serial Number: Class: Other Condition: Fine. The metal overall shows a mixed brown patina, with a few areas rubbed bright and mild spotting. Around 60% of the gold koftgari is present, with the front being especially well covered. A few rings and plate rivets have been bent or lost, with one of the back plates showing an old repair, possibly from period of use, where a roughly 1 inch square of metal was missing from the lower right corner and a period added piece riveted in behind it. This is an important attractive piece, which could hold a strong place in any advanced collection of armor or a significant centerpiece for a world-class museum.

  • USAUSA
  • 2015-12-05
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Cased Colt Model Colt Civilian Walker Revolver

Extremely Well-Documented, Historic and Iconic Only Known Original Cased Colt Civilian Walker Percussion Revolver, Known as "The Danish Sea Captain Walker" Offered here is without question the rarest, most historic and finest Colt Walker revolver Rock Island Auction Company has had the privilege to offer at auction. Known by the collecting fraternity as the Danish sea captain Walker, it is a type of revolver that gun collectors usually can only fantasize about owning. The story of the Walker revolver forever changed the course of American history and firearms design. It involves a young gallant U.S. Army officer, Samuel Hamilton Walker, a brilliant second generation inventor and manufacturer, Eli Whitney, Jr., and thrusted a young, unsuccessful (up until this point) but ambitious entrepreneur to the forefront of American manufacturing, one of the first American business tycoons, Col. Samuel Colt. The Colt U.S. 1847 Walker Model design was developed by Samuel Colt and influenced by suggestions from the former Texas Ranger Samuel Hamilton Walker who was serving as a captain in the Regiment of Mounted Riflemen. On December 7, 1846, Colt met with President James K. Polk to promote his revolver. President Polk directed Secretary of War William L. Marcy to order 1,000 revolvers from Colt through the Ordnance Department. This order marked the beginning of the relationship between Colt and the U.S. military which exists to this day. Colt made arrangements for the revolvers to be manufactured by Eli Whitney at the Whitneyville Armory. The original intent was to issue two revolvers per man to the Mounted Rifle Regiment. After filling the 1,000 unit order for the military, a civilian series of Walkers in the serial number range 1001-1100 was put into production for two purposes. The first and most notable was presentation arms which would become a famous tactic used by Colt throughout his illustrious career. Presentations were made to ranking military personages who could secure important military contracts. Second was to offer revolvers to the commercial or civilian market in order to get this new, innovative and potent revolver in consumer hands and a conversation started. This revolver, serial number 1022, was one of the only 100 civilian Walkers manufactured. The revolver has the distinctive half octagon nine inch barrel with German silver front sight blade and hinged round tip loading lever secured by a T-shaped spring. The top barrel flat is stamped ?ADDRESS, SAML. COLT, NEW-YORK CITY.? The barrel lug on the right side is stamped ?U.S./1847.? The Texas Rangers and Indian battle scene is roll engraved on the cylinder which has oval stop slots. The brass square back trigger guard has a distinctive broad base. The back strap is iron. The serial number is stamped on the bottom of the barrel lug, bottom of the frame, the rear of the cylinder, the trigger guard, and the back strap. The arbor pin has the number ?18,? and the wedge is unnumbered. The revolver properly lacks U.S. military inspection marks. The oak case is lined in green baize and contains rare accessories: a ?COLT?S/PATENT? marked bullet mold, ?COLTS PATENT? marked powder and ball flask (more about this accessory later), and question-marked shaped tool. This is the only known Colt Walker with the original case in existence. The case has brass hardware with steel screws and two compartments with lids featuring turned pulls. The lock plate is stamped ?BUNDGER? and ?BARMEN.? Unable to obtain this revolver for himself, famed firearms collector William Locke reverted to replicating the case for one of his own Walkers, serial number 1004, which is pictured in Frank Seller?s ?The William M. Locke Collection? on page 44. Accompanying the revolver is a remarkable record of its history handwritten in ink by Samuel Colt himself. The 3 inch x 3 inch card reads in Colt?s own handwriting, ?This Pistol is a correct sample of the Pistols furnished to the U.S. government [and] the Texas Ran

  • USAUSA
  • 2018-04-13
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Historic Winchester Model 1886 Rifle Serial Number 1 and Pocket Watch

Historic Winchester Model 1886 Rifle Serial Number 1 and Pocket Watch Presented to Congressional Medal of Honor Recipient Captain Henry W. Lawton, Noted Captor, following the Surrender of Chiricahua Apache Leader Geronimo This historic group consists of a Winchester Model 1886 Sporting Rifle (serial number 1) presented to Congressional Medal of Honor Recipient Capt. Henry W. Lawton by fellow Congressional Medal of Honor Recipient, friend and influencial firearms designor and noted friend of the Browning family Lieut. George E. Albee and a gold pocket watch made by C. Howard & Company Boston and presented to Capt. Lawton by "The Cattlemen of Central New Mexico". The top barrel flat of the rifle is inscribed: "ALBEE TO LAWTON". The inside of the watch case bears the inscription: "Presented to/CAPT. H.W. LAWTON/4th Cavalry/BY THE/Cattlemen of Central New Mexico/as a token of their appreciation of his/gallant service in the capture of the/Apache Indian Chief/-GERONIMO-/and his band/Albuquerque, New Mexico/Sept. 27th 1886". Henry W. Lawton (1843-1899) enlisted in the 9th Indiana Volunteer Infantry in August 1861. At the conclusion of his 90-day service, he re-enlisted in the 30th Indiana Infantry and was commissioned as a 1st Lieutenant. Lawton fought with the 30th Indiana in the battles of Shiloh, Stone's River, Chickamauga, Atlanta, Franklin and numerous small engagements. He was awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor for distinguished gallantry in the Battle of Atlanta on August 3, 1864. Speaking about the battle of Franklin, General W. Grose wrote, "The Thirtieth Indiana, most of whom were new recruits, under Captain Lawton, commanding the regiment, stood by the colors to the man and fought well." In March 1865, Lawton was promoted to Brevet Colonel for gallant and meritorious services. After he mustered out of Federal service, Lawton studied law briefly at Harvard University. In May 1867, he accepted a commission as a Lieutenant in the 41st Infantry. In 1871, Lawton transferred to the 4th Cavalry where he fought in campaigns against the Kiowa and Comanche. In the summer of 1886, under the direct orders of Gen. Nelson A. Miles, Capt. Lawton and Capt. Charles Gatewood led a small force of soldiers and Apache scouts into Mexico in pursuit of the hostile Chiricahua Apaches led by Geronimo. In September 1886, after a pursuit of over 1300 miles across Mexico and Arizona territory, Gatewood and Lawton found Geronimo and negotiated the surrender of last band of hostile Apaches to the U.S. Army. The surrender of Geronimo ended over 25 years of bloody conflict with the Apache in the Southwest. Alfred F. Sims, a solider who fought under Lawton's command, stated, "The work of Lawton in the Apache campaign will go down in our history as one of the greatest achievements of Indian warfare?.It was his untiring energy and ceaseless vigilance that put down the uprising." Lawton was promoted to major in 1888, Lieutenant-Colonel in 1889 and Colonel in 1898. During the Spanish-American War he fought in the battles of La Guasimas, El Caney and San Juan Hill. In 1899, Lawton, now a Major-General was ordered to the Philippines to command the 1st Division, VIII Corps, against Filipino insurgents. On December 19, 1899, General Lawton was killed in action in the battle of San Mateo. Speaking about Lawton's death, U.S. President William McKinley said, "I have learned with inexpressible sorrow of the death of Major-General Lawton, and ask to share with the officers and men of the Eighth Corps in their grief. One of the most gallant officers of the Army has fallen." Henry W. Lawton was one of the most respected officers in the U.S. Army. Lawton, Oklahoma was named in his honor. George E. Albee was a 4th Cavalry officer who served with Lawton in the Southwest. Included with this group is a copy of a letter from Winchester Repeating Arms to Lieutenant Albee signed by T.S. Bennett. The letter discusses testing and purchase of Winchester-Hotchkiss Bolt Action Rifles by the Army and mentions a report by Capt. Lawton. Albee's connection with Winchester almost certainly allowed him to obtain Winchester Model 1886 (serial number 1) as a gift for Capt. Lawton following the surrender of Geronimo. Serial number 1 is a standard Winchester Model 1886 Sporting Rifle with 26-inch full octagon barrel and full length magazine. The barrel has a standard sporting front sight with nickel silver blade and a folding leaf rear sight marked "1876" at the top of the leaf. The barrel, magazine, bolt and loading gate are blued and the forearm cap, receiver, hammer, trigger, lever and crescent buttplate are color casehardened. The stock and forearm are straight grain American walnut with a polished finish. The factory inscription "ALBEE TO LAWTON" is located on the top barrel flat between the rear sight and the receiver. The serial number "1" is stamped in script on the lower tang between the lever and the rear tang screw. The two-line legend ("-MANUFACTURED BY THE-/- "WINCHESTER REPEATING ARMS CO. NEW HAVEN. CONN. U.S.A.-") is roll-stamped on the top of the barrel ahead of the rear sight. "45-70" is stamped in script numerals on the top barrel flat between the inscription and the edge of the receiver. The upper receiver tang is roll-stamped "-MODEL 1886-" between the tang screws. The 1884 and 1885 patent markings found on the lower tang of later production rifles are not present on this rifle. The gold plated "C. Howard & Co." pocket watch is suspended by a heavy gold chain with long gold links inscribed with the names of the New Mexico cattlemen who contributed to the presentation. The watch is accompanied by two letters from former owner Arnold Marcus Chernoff that describe the watch, chain and circumstances of the presentation to Capt. Lawton. One of the letters notes that the price of the Howard watch and chain was $1000.00 in 1885. Also included with the group are numerous documents related to Henry W. Lawton's military career including copies of his service records dating from the 1861-1899. This combination of Winchester Model 1886 (serial number 1) presented to the officer credited with the surrender of Geronimo and the very high quality watch and chain presented to Capt. Lawton by New Mexico cattlemen is one of the most important and historic firearms groups ever offered by the Rock island Auction Co. General Henry W. Lawton's career involved distinguished combat service in the Civil War, Indian Wars, Spanish American War and Philippine Insurrection. He was awarded the Medal of Honor for gallantry in action during the Civil War, ended the Apache Wars, and was killed in action leading troops in the Philippines. ANY firearm associated with Lawton would be a rare and historic piece. This first production Winchester Model 1886 rifle with factory presentation to Henry W. Lawton from a fellow soldier following the surrender of Geronimo combined with a presentation watch and chain for the same action is a one-of-kind group. Manufacturer: Winchester Model: 1886 BBL: 26 inch octagon Stock: walnut Gauge: 45/70 Finish: blue/casehardened Grips: Serial Number: 1 Class: Antique Condition: Excellent. The barrel and magazine retain 95% of the original blue finish. Nearly all of the original blue finish remains on the bolt. The receiver retains 90% of the vivid original case colors with wear limited to the bottom where the case colors have faded. The forearm cap, hammer, trigger, lever and crescent buttplate retain 95% of the original case colors. The wood is excellent with much of the original finish remaining and showing a few scattered and relatively minor handling marks. The gold watch and case are excellent. This is a truly rare and historic rifle and watch in exceptional original condition. Arguably one of the most historic Winchester lever action rifles to come to public auction!

  • USAUSA
  • 2016-04-30
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1967 FERRARI 275 GTB/4 BERLINETTA

1967 FERRARI 275 GTB/4 BERLINETTA 100% restaurée, matching numbers, française d'origine Châssis n° 10427 Moteur n° 10427 Les premières années 1960 confirment chez Ferrari le passage progressif des types destinés à être utilisés en compétition et accessoirement sur la route aux types routiers éventuellement préparés pour la compétition. La base mécanique en est toujours le moteur V12 Colombo de 1947, le célèbre " simple arbre " sans cesse amélioré qui a signé un copieux palmarès tant sur la route que dans les épreuves d'endurance. Le glissement vers des modèles plus " civilisés " s'affirme avec la 250 GT/E, premier coupé 2+2 de 1960, puis avec les 330 America et 330 2+2 de 1963, tandis que la " 250 GT Lusso " avoue plus franchement sa vocation de routière " de luxe " tout en conservant l'empattement des redoutables berlinettes compétition " châssis court ", indice d'un caractère sportif encore vivace, confirmé par ses deux places, un confort relatif et une habitabilité restreinte. C'est à ce modèle hybride et performant, mais d'une rare élégance, complété par la série des 250 GT/L un peu plus confortables, que doit succéder en 1964 la nouvelle berlinette 275 GTB qui, en faveur de son comportement sportif, hérite de nombreuses solutions empruntées aux machines de course. Son moteur représente la dernière évolution du V12 Colombo original. Toujours du type " simple arbre ", il développe dorénavant 280 ch à 7 600 tr/min et, doté de six carburateurs double corps, 300 ch. Mais les grands progrès qui mettent fin à pas mal de critiques concernent la suspension et la transmission. Il s'agit de la première berlinette de production de Maranello à roues arrière indépendantes par triangles superposés (comme à l'avant) et combinés ressorts-amortisseurs réglables. La motricité s'en trouve grandement améliorée, le train arrière ayant moins tendance à décrocher sous fortes accélérations et sur mauvais revêtement. L'autre amélioration concerne le montage de la boîte à cinq rapports directement contre le carter du différentiel, au grand bénéfice de la répartition du poids et de la réduction des masses non suspendues. Le châssis comporte la traditionnelle structure tubulaire rigide typique de Maranello sur l'empattement fétiche de 2,40 m et des roues en alliage léger remplacent les roues à rayons " fil " (disponibles en option). Cet ensemble mécanique homogène, d'une belle maturité technique, est habillé par Pininfarina d'une carrosserie évocatrice d'un prometteur potentiel de puissance : capot long et plongeant, habitacle court et reculé, ligne de toit surbaissée fuyant jusqu'au panneau arrière vertical, hauteur de glace réduite. Presque agressive, la superbe 275 GTB ne laisse rien ignorer de sa musculature et elle démontre ses capacités en compétition, parfois carrossée en aluminium, en prenant notamment la troisième place aux 24 Heures du Mans 1965 (première en GT) derrière deux pures machines de course. Ses qualités sont aussitôt reconnues et la production atteint 250 exemplaires en un an. Au Salon de Paris 1965, la 275 GTB " série 2 " présente une lunette arrière agrandie et une capacité du coffre un peu supérieure. Sur le plan mécanique, l'arbre qui relie rigidement l'embrayage à la boîte-pont est désormais enfermé dans un tube qui garantit un parfait alignement de l'ensemble et réduit les vibrations. Au début 1966, une version C (pour compétition) apparaît qui offre un moteur plus poussé, des allègements sur de nombreux points (mécanique et carrosserie) et un graissage à carter sec. Ce type annonce une 275 encore plus efficace : la GTB/4. Présentée au Salon de Paris 1966, la GTB/4 révèle par son appellation qu'elle bénéficie d'une distribution à quatre arbres à cames en tête, une première sur une routière de Maranello. Ce raffinement provient directement des moteurs installés sur les prototypes à moteur arrière 275 et 330 P de la saison 1965. Les cames attaquent directement les poussoirs de soupape au grand bénéfice des montées en régime déjà brillantes sur la " simple arbre ". Le carter sec expérimenté sur le 275 GTB/C est évidemment retenu, comme les six carburateurs double corps, et si les 300 ch avoués ne traduisent pas un gain de puissance considérable, l'amélioration concerne le couple, les reprises et la souplesse. La " quatre arbres " garantit des relances interdites à toute autre GT à une époque où les limitations de vitesse sur autoroute n'existent pas. Jean-Pierre Beltoise avoue en 1967 avoir parcouru lors d'un essai 75 km en 23 minutes soit une moyenne de 195 km/h … arrêt péage compris. En 1968, la 275 GTB/4 clôture donc brillamment la saga des 250 GT et dérivés qu'il est impossible d'adapter aux nouveaux règlements américains en matière de sécurité passive et de protection de l'environnement. Une époque s'achève. Moins d'un an plus tard, Turin règnera sur la production… M. Chassedieu est le premier propriétaire de cette GTB/4. Il l'a commandée à la Franco Britannic à Paris qui lui délivre le 7 novembre 1967. Une facture d'entretien apparaît dans les registres Pozzi lorsque la voiture n'avait que 800 km. Elle est ensuite reprise par le concessionnaire de Levallois et revendue à un M. Charcot. Ensuite, M. Frédègue l'achète et la revend par l'intermédiaire de Me Poulain au propriétaire actuel qui n'est donc que le 5ème heureux détenteur de cette exceptionnelle voiture. Lorsqu'il l'achète en 1995, il demande à Franck de la faire repeindre entièrement, la peinture étant passée. Il s'aperçoit que la tôle souffrait des affres du temps et ils décident donc de la mettre totalement à nu afin d'atteindre l'état " concours ". Le moteur est également complètement démonté pièce par pièce, refait, remonté. Un livre du suivi complet des travaux avec toutes les photos sera remis au futur propriétaire qui pourra admirer le travail colossal réalisé sur cette voiture, jusque dans les moindres détails. L'intérieur a évidemment bénéficié d'une nouvelle sellerie en cuir noir de la plus belle facture, comme à l'origine, les moquettes y compris. Les travaux ont pris fin l'année dernière et l'auto a reçu les félicitations des équipes Pozzi lors de sa dernière sortie sur le Circuit du Val de Vienne, lors de la manifestation " Ferrari contre le cancer ". Il s'agit du modèle ultime et le plus recherché des 275, celle-ci nous prouvant lors de son essai sa souplesse, son équilibre, son onctuosité, elle est presque aérienne, évoluant comme un souffle inondé d'une musique magistrale. Carte grise française fully restored, matching numbers, French origin The early 1960s confirmed Ferrari's gradual changeover from models intended for competition, and incidentally for the road, to road cars that could be prepared for competition. The famous and constantly improved 'single shaft' V12 Colombo engine from 1947 still provided the mechanical base - and had been highly successful, whether in rallies or endurance events. The trend towards more 'civilized' models was confirmed with the 250 GT/E, the first 2+2 coupé, in 1960; then with the 330 America and 330 2+2 in 1963. The 250 GT Lusso, meanwhile, was clearly more of a roadster de luxe, although retaining the wheelbase of the redoubtable 'short chassis' racing berlinettes - reflecting a tenacious sporting character evidenced by its two-seater design and relative lack of comfort. It was in 1964 that the new 275 GTB berlinette succeeded to this elegant 'hybrid' and the slightly more comfortable 250 GT/L series. The 275 GTB inherited a range of solutions from racing cars. Its engine represented the latest evolution of the original Colombo V12. It was still of the 'single shaft' type, but now produced 280bch at 7600rpm or, with six twin carburettors, 300bch. But the progress which silenced most critics concerned suspension and transmission. This was Maranello's first production-line berlinette with independent back wheels and adjustable shock-absorbers/springs. Motivity was much improved as a result, as the front axle-unit was less inclined to lose its grip during rapid acceleration or on poor surfaces. The other improvement was the mounting of the five-speed gearbox directly against the sump of the differential, much to the advantage of weight-spread. The chassis had Maranello's traditional, rigid tubular structure on its trademark 2.40m wheelbase, with alloy wheels instead of radiating 'wire' wheels (available as an option). This homogenous, technically mature ensemble received Pininfarina bodywork evoking its power potential: a long, plunging bonnet; short cockpit moved further back; lowered roof-line receding down to the vertical back panel with smaller rear window. The superb, almost aggressive 275 GTB showed its racing potential - sometimes with aluminium bodywork - by finishing 3rd at the Le Mans 24 Hours in 1965 (first in GT class) behind two pure racing cars. Its qualities were recognized immediately, and production topped 250 cars inside a year. The 275 GTB 'Series 2' was presented at the 1965 Paris Motor Show, with a larger rear window and slightly bigger boot. In mechanical terms, the shaft rigidly linking the clutch to the transaxle was now enclosed in a tube, ensuring perfect alignment and reduced vibration. At the start of 1966 a C (competition) version appeared with a more powerful engine but lighter bodywork. This paved the way for an even more impressive version of the 275: the GTB/4, first presented at the Paris Motor Show in 1966. As its name suggests, the GTB/4 had four overhead camshafts - a first for a road-car built at Maranello, and a refinement taken directly from the 275 and 330P rear-engine prototypes of 1965. The cams directly attacked the valve pushrods, leading to increased revving (already impressive on the 'single shaft'). The dry sump had been successfully tested on the 275 GTB/C, as had the six twin carburettors; although the 300bhp produced did not represent much gain in power, torque, acceleration and smoothness were all improved. The 'four-shaft' provided acceleration beyond other GTs at a time of no motorway speed limits. In 1967 Jean-Pierre Beltoise claimed to have covered 47 miles in 23 minutes during a test-drive, at an average 122mph… including a stop at a toll. The 275 GTB/4 brought the 250 GT saga to a brilliant close in 1968, and it was impossible to adapt models to new American safety and environmental protection measures. It was the end of an era: within a year, Turin would be reigning supreme over production… The GTB/4's first owner, Mr Chassedieu, ordered it from Franco-Britannic Autos. It was delivered on 7 November 1967. A servicing invoice appears in the Pozzi register after the car's first 500 miles. It was subsequently reacquired by the Levallois dealers and sold to a Mr Charcot, then bought by a Mr Frédègue and sold in 1995 at auction by Hervé Poulain to the consignor, who is therefore the fifth lucky owner of this exceptional car. After buying it he asked Franck to have it entirely resprayed, as the paintwork had faded and the bodywork was the worse for wear. It was stripped down to 'racing' condition, and the engine taken apart, repaired, and reassembled. A booklet recording all the work undertaken, complete with photographs, will be given to the new owner, who will be able to assess all the work done on the car down to the smallest detail. The interior has been exquisitely refitted in new black leather, as per the original, carpet included. Work was completed last year, and the car received the congratulations of the Pozzi teams at its most recent outing on the Val de Vienne Circuit during the 'Ferrari Against Cancer' event. This is the ultimate 275 model, and the one most eagerly sought. During test drives it has shown superb handling, balance and a smoothness that takes the breath away. French title Estimation 750 000 - 850 000 € Sold for 837,474 €

  • FRAFrance
  • 2010-07-09
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1879 $4 Stella Coiled Hair Cameo PF-67 NGC

1879 Stella Coiled Hair Cameo PF-67 NGC George T. Morgan, designer (attributed) Obverse: Head of Liberty facing left, wearing diadem inscribed LIBERTY, her hair braided and tightly coiled on top of her head; around, ★6★G★.3★S★.7★C★7★G★R★A★M★S★; below, 1879. Reverse: Large five-pointed star inscribed in incuse: ONE / STELLA / — / 400 / CENTS, in five lines; around outer rim: UNITED STATES OF AMERICA — FOUR DOL.; around, within outer legend: E – PLURIBUS – UNUM — DEO – EST – GLORIA. Condition: NGC Proof 67 Cameo (Certificate number: 1963260-002 – Photo Proof 10-07; previous Photo Proof 04-05 [number 116535-001]). Faint cloudiness over deep, clear, pale yellow surfaces, with superb cameo-effect, and slight weakness at the centers (diagnostic for this issue). A minuscule mint-caused fleck in the reverse field between the star and N of UNUM and a shallow 'dimple' by the right foot of M on the obverse help to identify this fantastic gem. References: This Coin Published: Breen (Encyclopedia) 6409; Breen (Proofs) p. 165; Akers (1976) p. 82; Akers (Patterns) pp. 53, 104; Garrett & Guth (Encyclopedia) p. 170 ("...one of the finest pieces known..."), 570; A Guide Book to United States Coins (The Red Book), 59th ed., 2006, pp. 233, 399; 66th ed., 2013, pp. 252, 424; this piece used to illustrate the type on the NGC Coin Explorer website. Other references: Judd 1638; Pollack 1838; Garrett & Guth, 100 Greatest U.S. Coins. (PCGS 88058) Condition Census: Tied for finest known. NGC records only two other coins of comparable quality, and PCGS a single specimen (though not designated cameo); none finer graded by either service. (07-13) Rarity: Exceptionally rare. All references are in general accordance that the original mintage was only about fifteen pieces (Breen [Proofs] cites ten). The census information which has been published over the years seems to confirm the survival of most though with a fair share of impaired examples. Akers (1975) estimated 13-15 survivors, and Teichman (US Patterns website) positively identifies twelve, including 2 in the Smithsonian. According to the PCGS records of auction appearances, this is the single finest example to have been sold at auction: In its most recent appearance (2005) it more than doubled the price of any 1879 Coiled Hair Stella offered before. Immediately following that sale, according to the Red Book (2006 ed.), it ranked within the upper 40 of the 250 most valuable U.S. coins ever sold. In the most recent Red Book (2013), it still ranks in the top 100. Since the sale of this coin 2005, nothing remotely as fine has been offered at auction (two Proof 63 NGC examples have made four appearances, and in May, 2013 a Proof 64 Cameo PCGS example was sold). Provenance: Gold Rush Collection, Heritage, January 12, 2005, lot 30041, PR 67 Cameo NGC, "one of the very finest known" ($655,500), this coin is number 7 in their census (largely adapted from the US Patterns website); The Western Collection of United States Gold Coins, Stack's, December 12, 1981, lot 1137 ($80,000); a further comparison of catalogue images may further extend this coin's ownership history. However, because of photographs of differing quality, it appears that there are two possibilities, which may intersect at the 1992 Ed Trompeter sale. The Western Collection coin appears to come from a set which appeared in the Stack's 1976 ANA sale, lot 2920 ($225,000); that set, from the Grant Pierce and Son Collection had previously been in the Will W. Neil Collection, B. Max Mehl, June 17, 1947, lots 2602-2605 (sold as a set: $3,850). The identifying 'smudge' between the 9 and the neck appears to be a photographic blemish, and not on the coin. Further plate comparisons of the Tacasyl coin with the Trompeter coin correspond to various identifiers including: on the obverse, a toning "smudge" between the rim and third star, a minute "flake" at the right foot of the M, a toning spot between the S and the last star; and on the reverse, toning flecks between the S and T and T and E of STATES [Note: the reverse enlargement in the Trompeter catalogue is of the wrong coin]; therefore the provenance may also include: Ed Trompeter Collection, Superior Galleries, February 25, 1992, lot 134, Gem Brilliant Proof, "... Pristine ... outstanding." ($198,000) Neither the Neil Collection nor the Western Collection were mentioned in the Trompeter catalogue census for lot 134, and therefore they may substitute the pedigree given in that catalogue of the Lighthouse Sale, Stack's June 16-17, 1978, lot 828 ($90,000), and Rio Rancho Sale, Superior Galleries, October 15, 1974, lot 133 ($105,000). All these pedigree chains are impressive, but prospective bidders should to come to their own opinion. Note: The Stella is one of the few patterns collected alongside adopted issues that saw general circulation. The reason is unknown, but may be a combination of the allure of such an odd denomination and because enough 1879 Flowing Hair examples were struck to make acquiring an example possible for most advanced collectors. Also, perhaps, was the fact that some have clearly seen circulation or have been mounted as jewelry, supposedly given by congressmen to some of Washington, D.C.'s more prominent bordello owners. Regardless of the reason, Stellas have found their way into mainstream collections of regular issue coins.

  • USAUSA
  • 2013-09-24
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RARE AND HISTORIC COLT WHITNEYVILLE-WALKER PISTO

RARE AND HISTORIC COLT WHITNEYVILLE-WALKER PISTOL "A COMPANY # 210" AND ORIGINAL FLASK ISSUED AT VERA CRUZ IN 1847 TO PRIVATE SAM WILSON (TEXAS RANGER), LATER OBTAINED BY BREVET MAJOR GENERAL JOHN REESE KENLY OF MARYLAND AND BELIEVED TO BE THE FINEST EXAMPLE OF A MARTIAL WALKER EXTANT. SN A Co. 210. The Wilson-Kenly Walker is one of the most exciting Colt discoveries in many years. This magnificent Colt Walker Revolver, SN A Co. 210, has been the subject of much research proving it to be a well documented firearm from the Mexican War that is related to both a Texas volunteer private and one of the Maryland's most respected officers in both the Mexican War and Civil War. Moreover, this revolver retains an extraordinary amount of orig finish that is a rarity in and of itself. Until now this historic treasure has been almost unknown and never photographed or offered at public sale. At the annual Meeting of the National Rifle Association in 1972 in Portland, Oregon, the current owner did exhibit it . As a result the firearm won a prestigious Certificate of Recognition for its "...outstanding historical value, or beauty, or rarity..." and the NRA Silver Medallion #127 as one of the ten best arms at the show. The Colt Walker was officially designated a pistol as it was the first revolver ever purchased by the Army Ordnance Department. Many men familiar with single shot percussion muzzle loading pistols had never seen a revolver, much less used one, resulting in many burst cylinders and the accidental firing of all six chambers. The Walker pistols were manufactured during a short production run in 1847 and were named after Capt. Samuel Hamilton Walker, a renowned national hero who fought in the Texas-Mexico wars. Capt. Walker approached Samuel Colt, a leading firearms designer, to create a stronger and more reliable revolver suitable for the Texas Rangers and the U.S. Dragoons. The new weapon was designed by both Colt and Walker, based on the Colt Paterson revolver, but clearly an improvement. It proved to be a revolver of such size, weight, and heft that Colt was reputed to have said, "It would take a Texan to shoot it". Walker wrote in 1847 that the gun was "as effective as a common rifle at 100 yards and superior to a musket even at 200". Far more powerful than the earlier Patersons, this gun quickly became legendary. In fact at the time it was made it was the most powerful handgun in the world and remained so until the advent of the .44 Magnum in about 1954. For those who could afford it, the Walker Colt was a symbol of strength, authority and great financial means. While the revolver was a financial success for Colt, Capt. Walker met a tragic end. Fighting at the front in the Mexican War, he was killed by a lance in the Battle of Juamantla in early October 1847. At the time of his death, Walker was carrying a pair of Walker revolvers--gifts from Colt which had just arrived a few days before. The spectacular condition and rarity of this revolver certainly qualifies it as a special treasure, but also of equal importance is its impeccable provenance and history. This revolver has descended through the family of Bvt. Maj. Gen. John Reese Kenly of Maryland and this is the first time that this revolver and flask have been offered for sale outside of Kenly's family descendants. Research in published materials, Colt Factory records and Federal documents show that this Colt-Walker revolver was part of the second shipment of 280 revolvers that were received from Eli Whitney's factory at the New York Ordnance Depot on August 6, 1847. Three days later, this shipment of Colts was forwarded to the United States Ordnance Depot in Vera Cruz Mexico. All 220 of the revolvers designated for "A Company" (and so marked) were in this shipment along with 60 others marked for "B Company". The revolvers arrived in Vera Cruz on October 22, 1847. On the 26th of October, Lt. Josiah Gorgas (the future Confederate Brig. Gen. and Chief of the Ordnance Bureau) issued 180 of these Colts to Col. John Coffee Hays, Commander for the First Regiment, Texas Mounted Vols. This revolver, serial number 210 was part of that issue. At the time of issue, the First Regiment was stationed at Vergara, just three miles from the Depot at Vera Cruz on the road to Jalapa. One of the privates in Company I, named Samuel Wilson, received this Colt, confirmed and attested to by his presence on the regimental roster and the crudely scratched name "Samuel Wilson" on the trigger guard. Wilson is listed in the records of Texas Veterans in the Mexican War as "died at Jalapa, Mexico" at age 33. The cause of death is unknown. It is, however, known that John Kenly was in Jalapa at that time. The circumstances under which Sam Wilson's Colt-Walker revolver was acquired by Kenly are unknown. In Kenly's published work, Memoirs of A Maryland Volunteer: War With Mexico, in the Years 1846-8, on page 366, Kenly states, "Nov 30 I was this day appointed by Colonel Hughes the military commandant of the garrison at Jalapa". On page 374, he further states, as part of his duties he was "to inspect the company drills, the company quarters, and the hospitals...". There are many mentions of his contact with Texas volunteer regiments, his duty in and around Vera Cruz and Jalapa and there is a mention that he picked up "interesting" firearms. Kenly's memoirs also mention interactions with Col. Hays, Commander of the First Regiment Texas Mounted Vols, where Samuel Wilson served. As military commandant and being in charge of the hospital (likely when Wilson died), Kenly was ideally positioned to acquire the revolver from the dying Wilson. One thing for certain is the fact that Kenly somehow acquired Sam Wilson's Walker Colt and not only kept it throughout his lifetime (together with various other accouterments and memorabilia acquired in the Mexican War, which were sold on the private market by the same consignor prior to his meeting with Julia's), but also passed the Walker (and his collection of memorabilia) onto his descendants. The revolver eventually descended to the consignor's mother to whom John Reese Kenly was her great uncle. In the consignor's sworn affidavit, which accompanies this lot, he states that in the late spring or summer of 1941 he, together with his mother and brother visited the old Kenly home for the last time. At that time, the consignor himself discovered a powder flask in a trunk in the same house, which later proved to be the orig flask for this Colt Walker. The revolver has been in his mother's possession and eventually passed to him until the time that it was consigned to Julia's. John Reese Kenly was born in Baltimore, Maryland on January 11, 1818. He was schooled in Baltimore, studied law and was admitted to the Maryland Bar in 1845. Like all good socialites, Kenly joined one of the City's elite militia units "The Eagle Artillery". With the opening of the Mexican War, Kenly attempted to enter the United States Regulars but was told that the War Department needed companies of volunteers from Maryland and Washington D.C. and that he could achieve a higher rank by starting a company of his own to respond to the crisis. In Baltimore, in 36 hours, he had raised the necessary officers and men for the company and shortly thereafter reported for duty in Washington D.C.. Thus, now as Capt, Kenly had become attached to the Battalion of Baltimore and Washington Volunteers. During the Battle of Monterey, Kenly distinguished himself for gallantry under fire and received a formal resolution of thanks from the Maryland legislature. Upon the expiration of his term he returned to Baltimore, raised yet another company of volunteers named the Maryland and District of Columbia Volunteers and returned to Mexico in the rank of Major where he remained through various campaigns in and around Vera Cruz until the end of the war. Following the War with Mexico, John Kenly returned to Baltimore to resume his law practice, remaining in the local militia. With the outbreak of the Civil War, President Abraham Lincoln commissioned Kenly as Col. of the First Maryland (Union) Infantry. During Stonewall Jackson's Valley Campaign, Kenly was wounded and taken prisoner at the Battle of Front Royal Virginia. In this action, at the cost of nearly 600 casualties and many prisoners, Kenly's heroism was reported to have saved Gen. Nathanial Banks' army. Kenly was paroled and exchanged on August 15, 1862. Within days he received notice of his promotion and commissioning as Brig. Gen. With his new rank he was assigned to command "The Maryland Brigade" which was a consolidation of the 1st, 4th, 6th, 7th and 8th Maryland Infantry Regiments. Following the Antietam Campaign, the Maryland Brigade was assigned to Western Maryland providing protection against the constant attacks on the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad. In the fall of 1863, Kenly received command of the 3rd Division, 1st Army Corps in the Bristoe, Virginia Campaign. Leaving the Army of the Potomac at the outset of Grant's Richmond Campaign, Kenly was sent to Wilmington, Delaware to command the District of Delaware. In the course of Confederate Gen. Jubal Early's campaign on Washington D.C., Kenly pursued the Confederates out of Monocacy Junction, Maryland with a band of local home guards and militia. The end of Kenly's battlefield career came with the destruction of a supply train in Winchester, VA by Confederates under his watch that resulted in a board of inquiry. While the results were inconclusive, Kenly was sent off to command the District of the Eastern Shore of Maryland for the remainder of the War. On March 13, 1865, Kenly received a commission as Bvt. Maj. Gen. of Vols and was mustered out of service in August of the same year. He returned to Baltimore to practice law, received, yet another resolution of thanks from the Maryland State Legislature and a presentation sword from the City of Baltimore. He died on December 20, 1891. This is a rare Whitneyville-Walker Colt Revolver along with its orig flask in extraordinary condition and believed to be the finest conditioned, martial Walker in existence. The impeccable provenance, and being identified to a prominent Mexican War and Civil War officer of note, makes it the most important and orig martial Walker known to us to exist. Opportunities to acquire rare firearms with important and documented histories do not come along very often. Of particular interest is the fact that this revolver and flask have both a documented history to Pvt. Samuel Wilson, First Texas Mounted Volunteers (including his name on the revolver) and undisputed family connections to Bvt. Maj. Gen. John Reese Kenly being a part of a magnificent collection of Kenly artifacts that have been in descendants' hands since Kenly's death. This is the first time that this revolver has ever been offered for sale. In this day and age, the sale of this revolver and flask will represent its first possession outside of the family. This fine revolver is described as having a 9" oct to rnd bbl with German silver front sight and address reading from cyl to muzzle, with a tiny "P" proof on the top flat just above the forcing cone. It has bayonet style rammer latch that is broken. Left side of bbl lug has the full serial number and right side has a small "US" over "1847" just above the wedge screw. Wedge is not numbered but appears to be the orig item. Frame has the three screws on the left side of which only the hammer screw extends through the right side and has full serial number on the left front side. It has its orig square back brass trigger guard with orig short trigger with rounded front edge on the trigger slot. Bottom front flat of the trigger guard has the abbreviated serial number with a small "H" proof at the rear edge of the trigger bow. The trigger bow has the crudely scratched name "Samuel Wilson". Back strap is blued steel with full serial number on the butt strap reading from heel to toe and has a small "H" proof about centered on the back. Mounted with a smooth, straight grain, 1-pc walnut grip with legible cartouches on each side & a small "P" proof on the left bottom edge. Right side of the front strap, under the grip, is stamped "210" which number is also stamped inside the front strap channel of the grip. It has its orig U-shaped hammer spring with no additional visible numbers under the grip. Front end of the frame, between frame pins and bottom of the cylinder arbor are also stamped "210". The cylinder, which is in the white, has its full rolled Ranger/Indian fight scene with a fine strong pressure ridge toward the rear edge. It also has the abbreviated serial number on the panel between "MODEL U.S.M.R." and "COLT'S PATENT", with fine stippled, checkered background. It has oval cylinder stop notches with a single safety pin on the rear face and the number "430" on the opposite land between nipple recesses. "430" is the sequential number of Walker revolvers produced. Bore has seven lands & grooves of about equal width with a right hand twist. It is the contention of this cataloger and numerous historians & researchers that Walker cylinders were never finished blue but were left "in the white", as this one remains today. Accompanied by its orig "COLTS PATENT", brass Walker flask with dbl sided repoussed stand of flags & trophy of arms with a mortar on the left side, a stack of cannonballs at the far left edge & a single large cannonball below the field carriage wheel. Right side has drum that is tilted well behind the other field carriage wheel. Below this scene are crossed Paterson rifles & a pair of crossed Walker style revolvers over the ribbon embossed with "COLTS PATENT". See The Powder Flask Book, Riling, No. 826, which he refers to this flask as the "later Walker" type. Also accompanied by an orig National Rifle Association of America sterling silver medallion serial number "127" which was awarded to this revolver as previously noted. (Additional Information). Right grip has a hand-carved "K", undoubtedly for John Reese Kenly. Item is accompanied by a Statement of Authenticity by Bobby Vance, Briggs, TX. PROVENANCE: Pvt. Samuel Wilson, Company I, 1st Regiment Texas Mounted Volunteers; Brevet Maj. Gen. John Reese Kenly; descendants of Brevet Maj. Gen. John Reese Kenly. CONDITION: Exceptionally fine. The bbl retains 60-70% strong orig Colt factory blue, glossy & bright in sheltered areas and strong on right side of the lug. Bbl is flaked & slightly worn with left side cleaned to a blue/gray patina. Right side retains thinning orig blue. Rammer & rammer handle retain case colors turned silver with about 60% faded colors on the pivot. Wedge retains about 80% orig blue. Frame retains 30-40% faded case colors with the balance turned to a silver/gray patina. Trigger guard has lightly worn edges with a few minor nicks & scratches and retains a light mustard patina, having been cleaned a long time ago and now beginning to regain a patina. Cyl, in the white & never finished blue, has a few minor nicks around the front edge with strong clean nipples and about half of the orig safety pin. Overall, the cyl has a few minor scratches and some extremely fine pin prick pitting and retains about 85-90% strong Ranger/Indian fight scene with the fine shaded background mostly still present. Fine shading on the horses & figures is also mostly still present. Back strap retains about 50% orig blue, glossy & strong toward the top and on the shoulders. Butt strap retains about 75% thinning orig blue. Grip has a minuscule chip on the right toe with four or five dings on the right side and retains a fine hand worn patina with both cartouches legible. Mechanics are crisp, brilliant shiny bore with one spot of pitting and a few minor light spots of discoloration. Flask shows small nicks & dings and a couple of minor dents and retains a dark mustard patina. Spout is functional. 4-33737 JR493 (500,000-1,000,000)

  • USAUSA
  • 2008-10-07
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1880 $4 Stella Flowing Hair PF-67â605 NGC

1880 $4 Stella Flowing Hair PF-67★ NGC Charles E. Barber, designer Obverse: Head of Liberty facing left, wearing diadem inscribed LIBERTY, hair flowing in long locks; around, ★6★G★.3★S★.7★C★7★G★R★A★M★S★; below, 1880. Reverse: Large five-pointed star inscribed in incuse: ONE / STELLA / — / 400 / CENTS, in five lines; around outer rim: UNITED STATES OF AMERICA — FOUR DOL.; around, within outer legend: E – PLURIBUS – UNUM — DEO – EST – GLORIA. Condition: NGC Proof 67★ (Certificate number: 1963260-003 – Photo Proof 10-07; previous Photo Proof 10-01 [number 1634634-001], PF-67 [without star]: "...this is the finest example of the rare 1880 Flowing Hair type certified by NGC...Perhaps the finest of an estimated two dozen survivors, this fabulous coin is a sheer delight."). A spectacular, beautifully toned coin of medium red gold. This is an unusually well-struck example with the central strands of Liberty's hair well defined. Lightly mirrored fields with subdued, but frosted devices. The central striations seen on all examples are virtually invisible on this specimen. A small mint-caused 'comma' extending from the tail of the first 7 in the peripheral inscription (the Trompeter example has a similar feature), a thin reverse toning line from the right foot of the R of FOUR to the rim, and a tiny raised dot at the tail of the first S in the obverse inscription serve as an identifiers. A magnificent superb gem. References: This Coin Published: Breen (Proofs) p. 167 (5); Akers (Patterns) pp. 53, 85; A Guide Book to United States Coins (The Red Book), 59th ed., 2006, p. 402; this piece used to illustrate the type on the NGC Coin Explorer website. Other references: Judd 1635; Pollack 1832; Breen (Encyclopedia) 6410; Akers (1976) pp. 80-81, 103-104; Garrett & Guth (Encyclopedia) p. 170; Garrett & Guth, 100 Greatest U.S. Coins. (PCGS 8059) Condition Census: Tied for finest known. Perhaps the finest; while NGC records only two other examples as Proof 67 (cameo), this is the only example to bear the star designation for eye appeal. PCGS has graded a single coin at this grade, with the cameo designation. Neither firm has graded anything finer. As the Sotheby's/Stack's cataloguers of the H. Jeff Browning (Dallas Bank) Collection stated, "it is hard to imagine any of comparable quality." Garrett and Guth, noted it is one of the finest seen by them, and graded the Smithsonian's example as Proof 65, two full points lower than this exceptional coin. (07-13) Rarity: Exceedingly rare. An underappreciated rarity, perhaps because it is the same design as the much more abundant 1879 flowing hair issue. Breen (Proofs) estimated only 15 struck, a figure that Akers agrees with (but notes that a second, smaller mintage, must have supplemented the original number). Garrett and Guth suggest a total mintage of only 25 coins and a survival of about 15 to 20 pieces (which Teichman's census appears to bear out). The PCGS census of auction prices (which is reasonably comprehensive back to 1979) lists no Proof 67 examples having ever been offered at auction (with the exception of this specimen, which was sold uncertified in 2001 and, by nearly $100,000, exceeded the highest price ever recorded to that date for an example of this variety). Nothing remotely comparable to this example has appeared at auction in more than a decade, but a Proof 66 (NGC) example was sold in January, 2013. Regardless of the total number known, as noted above, few, if any, can match this remarkable coin, superbly preserved and with a distinguished pedigree. Even five years after its 2001 auction appearance it ranked among the Red Book's (2006 ed.) top 250 auction prices realized. Provenance: H. Jeff Browning Collection ("The Dallas Bank Collection"), Sotheby's/Stack's, October 29-30, 2001, lot 362, Gem Brilliant Proof, "... Monumental" ($241,500); Dr. John E. Wilkison Collection (via David W. Akers and Mike Brownlee prior to 1973). Note: When Mint engravers approached the design of the international coinage, they had any number of challenges to overcome. As noted above, the issues of alloy, weight, and how to express the intrinsic value of the coin internationally were all cleverly and quite simply dealt with. But, it should be remembered that the Stella was also meant to circulate in the United States (where an understanding of the metric standard was not then, and is still not, commonplace) and it also had to meet certain legal requirements regarding various portions of its design; so, the obverse bore a head (and inscription) emblematic of Liberty, while the reverse bore the inscriptions UNITED STATES OF AMERICA and E PLURIBUS UNUM. The use of the motto IN GOD WE TRUST was optional at this time, and was replaced by the DEO EST GLORIA (the Glory is God's). The denomination was expressed in three different ways: 400 Cents, Four Dol., and finally One Stella (within the star for which the denomination was named). Despite the number of competing design elements, the Stellas are well-conceived, uncluttered and, like so many unadopted patterns, in many ways artistically superior to the designs ultimately accepted for circulation. As also noted above, Congressional interest in the proposed international coinage caused that body to order more examples for the membership; according to Breen (Encyclopedia) many of the 1879 dated issues were in fact struck in 1880 (in January, April, and May). However, the concept of the international coinage was scuttled by legislators when no difference in the alloys could be readily distinguished (the standard circulating U.S. coins were .900 pure, and the Stellas .857 pure). Nevertheless, the concept of a Four Dollar gold piece did greatly appeal to numismatists as an oddity and the two issues of 1880 are widely accepted as having been produced for well-placed collectors of pattern coinage.

  • USAUSA
  • 2013-09-24
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1930 BENTLEY SPEED SIX 6,5 L TOURER LE MANS

1930 BENTLEY SPEED SIX 6,5 L TOURER LE MANS Châssis n° SB 2775 Moteur n° NH 2736 S Walter Owen Bentley, ingénieur ferroviaire passé à l'automobile puis aux moteurs aéronautiques pendant la Première Guerre mondiale, mit son expérience de motoriste à profit en concevant en 1919 une voiture de sport à moteur trois litres quatre cylindres très inspiré par le moteur Mercedes à arbre à cames en tête de 1914. Particularités : le moteur Bentley avait un bloc-cylindres et une culasse, coulés en une seule pièce et quatre soupapes par cylindre. La Bentley trois litres produite jusqu'en 1929 à plus de 1600 exemplaires remporta les 24 Heures du Mans 1924. Dans la foulée de ce type réussi, Bentley et ses commanditaires visèrent une clientèle plus exigeante en étudiant une six-cylindres de 6,5 litres clairement opposée à la nouvelle Rolls-Royce Phantom I. Cette première Bentley Six, lancée fin 1925, bénéficia de l'adoption d'une commande de distribution originale très silencieuse par bielles et excentriques, inspirée par le système bielle et manivelle des locomotives. Sur un marché du luxe restreint, mais très encombré, ces performantes mais coûteuses voitures eurent du mal à s'imposer malgré la réputation que la marque se forgea par ses victoires au Mans de 1927 à 1930, les succès de 1929 et 1930 étant signés par les nouvelles Speed Six apparues l'année précédente. Cette version résultait d'une refonte de la 6.5 Litre dont le caractère sportif fut plus affirmé. Outre un radiateur plus grand à côtés parallèles, la voiture avait un moteur plus puissant grâce à un rapport de compression supérieur et à deux carburateurs. Les clients sportifs avaient souhaité retrouver avec la 6.5 Litre la vivacité de la première trois-litres, plus légère, mais la première six-cylindres avait déçu, entraînant la création de la 4,5 litres à quatre cylindres. La nouvelle Speed Six devait atteindre un niveau de performance digne de la marque en remportant, outre deux fois les 24 Heures du Mans, plusieurs grandes épreuves d'endurance britanniques. C'est cette même Speed Six habillée d'une carrosserie spéciale profilée qui fit parler d'elle en 1930 en battant de quatre heures, pilotée par Woolf Barnato, patron de la firme, la liaison ferroviaire entre Cannes et Londres. La voiture présentée n° SB 2775 prit la route en juillet 1930, habillée d'une carrosserie de limousine réalisée par Lancefield sur ce châssis de 12' 6'' ( 382 cm) d'empattement. Dès 1938, elle fut recarrossée en tourer Le Mans par Corsica. Acquise en 2002 par l'actuel propriétaire auprès du négociant britannique Stanley Mann, spécialiste des Bentley Vintage, elle a été depuis régulièrement conduite et entretenue. Cette formidable machine est prête à reprendre la route. Carte grise française Titre britannique V5 Walter Owen Bentley began his career as a railway engineer before going into automobiles (then aero-engines during World War I). He made full use of all his mechanical experience in 1919 to design a sports car with a four-cylinder, 3-litre engine, much influenced by the Mercedes overhead camshaft engine of 1914. The Bentley engine had a cylinder-block and cylinder-head cast in a single piece, and four valves per cylinder. This Bentley 3-Litre won the Le Mans 24 Hours in 1924, and 1,600 of these cars had been produced by 1929. Its success prompted Bentley and his backers to target a more demanding clientèle by planning a six-cylinder 6 1/2-Litre, no doubt in response to the new Rolls-Royce Phantom I. This first Bentley Six, launched at the end of 1925, boasted an original, very quiet distribution system using connecting rods and eccentrics, inspired by a locomotive's rod and crankshaft system. This high-performance, albeit costly, car struggled to make its mark on the limited yet overcrowded luxury market, despite Bentley's burgeoning reputation in the wake of their Le Mans victories from 1927-30. The wins in 1929/30 were obtained by the new Speed Six launched in 1928 as a more sporting version of the 6 1/2-Litre, with a larger radiator and more powerful engine, thanks to a higher compression-ratio and two carburettors. Race-minded clients had hoped the 6 1/2-Litre would display the same vivacity as the first, lighter 3-Litre, but the initial six-cylinder proved a disappointment - prompting the design of the new, four-cylinder 4 1/2-Litre. The new Speed Six soon reached levels of performance worthy of the marque by twice winning the Le Mans 24 Hours, along with several major British endurance events. This same Speed Six, with special streamlined bodywork, hit the headlines in 1930 when, driven by the firm's chairman (and Surrey wicket-keeper) Woolf Barnato, it raced the Blue Train from Cannes to Calais and on to London (via Dover), winning by four hours. The car presented here, n° SB 2775, was made in July 1930 with limousine bodywork by Lancefield on this chassis with a 12' 6'' (3.82m) wheelbase; the body was reworked by Corsica as a Le Mans Tourer in 1938. It was acquired by its current owner from the British dealer and Vintage Bentley specialist Stanley Mann in 2002, and has since been regularly driven and maintained. It is a formidable machine, and ready for the road. French registration "carte grise" British title V5 Estimation 390 000 - 440 000 € Sold for 736,710 €

  • FRAFrance
  • 2010-07-09
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Profoundly Rare and Equally Magnificent Cased No. 5 Texas Paterson

Profoundly Rare and Equally Magnificent Cased No. 5 Texas Paterson with 6 Silver Bands 9" Barrel, Loading Lever and Shell Carved Ivory GripsPresented before you is one of the most important, impressive and significant revolvers ever to be offered for public sale. This cased revolver embodies all the characteristics of an investment grade collectable firearm: beauty, intrigue, rarity, desirability and unparalleled historical significance. It is with both great pleasure and honor that we at Rock Island Auction Company offer this benchmark revolver back to the collecting fraternity. The 9" barrel with German silver front sight, proudly exhibits the standard snake and star roll marking "Patent Arms M'g Co. Paterson, N.J.-Colt's Pt.". Shell carved ivory grips. Brightly polished steel with blue finish with the frame, hammer and back strap casehardened. Accompanied by its original factory casing of varnished mahogany with standard beveled lid. Full compliment of accessories including matching extra cylinder, also bearing serial number 515, and brass capper marked "No 123" inside the lid and on the surface of the interior. Wood core to ball portion of the combination powder and ball charger with "99" marked on each of the copper halves. Escalloped German silver escutcheon inlaid on lid of case. This revolver was first offered for sale in 1938 a catalog put out by the Far West Hobby Shop located at 406 Clement Street, San Francisco CA featuring the David L. Ingalls Collection in which this very Paterson revolver is described: G1419 COLT-PATERSON LONG BARREL "TEXAS" MODEL WITH LOADING LEVER, CASED.................$1650.00 9" OCTAGON BARREL with PERFECT BORE 36 cal. 5 shots. ONE-PIECE IVORY GRIPS CARVED WITH SHELL DESIGN AT ROUNDED TOP SECTION. Concealed trigger. LOADING LEVER UNDER BARREL WITH HOOK-SHAPED SPRING CATCH AS IN WALKER MODEL. At the muzzle A SILVER BAND IS INLAID AROUND THE BARREL. 2 bands of silver are INLAID IN THE BREECH OF THE BARREL. On under side at loading lever screw and at the catch spring are 2 more SILVER INLAYS. Cylinder engraved with scene of stagecoach holdup. In a rectangle marking the beginning and end of this scene is engraved the name, "COLT," in Roman type letters. . . .Here is the realization of an arms collector's dream - an outfit that will stand for all time as the very TOPS is any exhibit at Colts. Every factor that contributes to the valuation of an antique firearm is outstandingly apparent in this magnificent Texas-Paterson - Age, Historical Interest, Beauty, Condition, Pride of Possession, Great Demand, Extreme Rarity, etc. In our opinion, this is the most desirable Colt outfit ever offered for sale at any time. Aside from the fact that it will be some collector's most treasured arms possession, it will also prove a gilt-edged investment for the future. ENTIRE OUTFIT IS EXTREMELY FINE, THE REVOLVER ESPECIALLY SO. Plate No. 9 This cased set was then subsequently purchased from the Far West Hobby Shop by Mr. William M. Locke, in whose collection serial no. 515 remained for decades. Texas Paterson Colt revolvers are seldomly observed today. The fact being that 150 were bought by the U.S. government for the Navy. Further, the Republic of Texas purchased 180 Texas Patersons (with 9-inch barrels) for its Navy. Consideration should be given to the fact that Texas Paterson revolvers served as the immediate predecessor to the Walker Colt, and both are extremely important in the evolution of Colt firearms and the evolution of repeating firearms. Furthermore recent decades have seen several examples of the No. 5 Texas Paterson leave private hands and enter into public institutions' collections. Among the institutions which boast these rare and sought after arms are The Metropolitan Museum of Art, The New York Historical Society, the Smithsonian Institution's National Museum of American History, the Woolaroc Museum (Bartlesville, Oklahoma), the Raymond Baldwin Museum of Connecticut History, the Wadsworth Atheneum (Hartford, Colonel and Mrs. Samuel Colt Collection, a bequest of Elizabeth Hart Jarvis Colt in 1905), the Autry Museum of Western Heritage (now known as the Autry National Center of the American West), the Cody Firearms Museum of the Buffalo Bill Historical Center, the National Cowboy Museum and Western Heritage Center, and the Paterson Museum (Paterson, New Jersey - cradle of the revolver and birthplace of Paterson Colt production). Considering the fact that Paterson firearms are disappearing into museums, and considering all other aspects of rarity and significance, the quite desirable Colt Texas or Holster Model No. 5 Paterson Revolver, no. 515 is within the ranks of the most sought after of Paterson Colt revolvers. The Holster No. 5 or Texas Paterson Colt Revolver, serial no. 515 is well deserving of a place in a discriminating collection of Colt percussion revolvers. This is a rare and well-documented example of a seldom observed variation with round back cylinder, six silver band inlays and the scalloped German silver escutcheon inlay on the case lid. Also important in determining rarity is the fact that the German silver or silver banded Texas Paterson revolvers are significantly more rare than Texas Paterson revolvers with German silver or silver band inlays and hand engraving. It is also important to recognize that serial no. 515 was selected to be featured in the historic landmark Wadsworth Atheneum Museum of Art loan exhibition, "Samuel Colt Presents" (November 1, 1961 to January 1962), and pictured in the book accompanying that event, of the same title. Of further merit this important Texas Paterson comes from one of the most famous of all Colt Collections of William M. Locke whose collection amounted to approximately 40% of "Samuel Colt Presents." Texas Paterson No. 515 can be found in the following books and periodicals: R.L. Wilson, American Arms Collectors Percussion Colts and Their Rivals The Al Cali Collection, pages 2-3. G. Charter Harrison, Jr., The Gun Collector, issue 39, "The William M. Locke Collection," page 659. Sellers, Frank, Colts from the William M. Locke Collection, page 41. Wilson, R.L. Colt Handguns, (Japanese; pages 2-3). The Paterson Colt Book, Featuring the Dennis A. LeVett Collection, pages 148-149, and pages 286-287. The Colt Heritage and Colt An American Legend, page 2. Samuel Colt Presents A Loan Exhibition of Presentation Percussion Colt Firearms, page 15 (lent by William M. Locke).Wilson, R.L. and R.E. Hable, Colt Pistols, pages 13, 18, 19. Provenance: David L. Ingalls (pictured in Far West Hobby Shop catalog, item G-1419) 1938 William M. Locke L. Allan Caperton George Repaire Al Cali- 2011 Property of a GentlemanManufacturer: ColtModel: PatersonBBL: 9" roundStock: Gauge: 36Finish: blue/casehardenedGrips: ivorySerial Number: 515

  • USAUSA
  • 2014-05-03
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1972 LAMBORGHINI P400 MIURA SV

1972 LAMBORGHINI P400 MIURA SV Châssis n° 5104 Moteur n° 30752 La Lamborghini Miura P400 définitive, présentée au Salon de Genève 1966, habillée par Bertone d'une carrosserie aux lignes à la fois viriles et sensuelles signées Marcello Gandini, fit l'effet d'une bombe. Ses caractéristiques mécaniques étaient à la hauteur de son style et Ferruccio Lamborghini, qui avait voulu inquiéter un Enzo Ferrari sceptique quant à ses capacités de constructeur, réussit pleinement son coup. Les choix techniques distinguaient totalement la Miura des productions de Maranello, destinées à la route qui venaient tout récemment d'acquérir des roues arrière indépendantes : le châssis plate-forme très élaboré était à la fois rigide et plus léger que le châssis tubulaire des Ferrari et la position arrière centrale du moteur monté en travers fit date. La direction à crémaillère était aussi un avantage pour la précision et la réponse par rapport au boîtier de ses rivales. Le moteur quatre litres à 12 cylindres en V et 4 ACT (conçu initialement par Giotto Bizzarrini) qui équipait déjà les 400 GT avait été poussé à 350 ch en version standard et à 430 en version Sprint (données constructeur à l'époque). Son architecture en faisait un bijou de mécanique avec une seule pièce coulée en alliage léger, réunissant les blocs-cylindres, le carter supérieur et ceux de la boîte-pont, l'ensemble exigeant des usinages et des montages d'une extrême précision. Chaque Miura était assemblée manuellement comme un prototype. La nouvelle Lamborghini fit tourner les têtes, devenant aussitôt la supercar à posséder pour ceux qui en avaient les moyens, à la fois pour ses performances et pour son style. Ferruccio Lamborghini avait toutes les raisons d'être fier de cette création à nulle autre pareille. Toutefois, il voulut faire mieux encore et, par une succession de retouches et d'améliorations, parvint à proposer la plus puissante P400 S en 1969 suivie en 1971 de la P400 SV, considérée comme la meilleure des Miura. Plus performante et dotée d'un comportement dynamique raffiné, la P400 SV avait bénéficié de longues années de mises au point. Châssis, trains roulants, suspensions, caractéristiques aérodynamiques, roues (des Campagnolo spéciales), détails de carrosserie et moteur plus souple définissaient une voiture pas forcément plus rapide (285 km/h quand même !), mais plus sûre, plus facile à contrôler et dotée de meilleures reprises. Ses concepteurs même la jugèrent " différente " des P400 et P400 S, en la créditant d'un comportement à grande vitesse beaucoup plus rigoureux et précis. Apogée de la Miura, la P400 SV fut la dernière Lamborghini produite sous la supervision personnelle de Ferruccio Lamborghini qui céda ses parts dans Automobili Lamborghini SpA en avril 1972. Cette sublime Miura SV #5104 est la 6ème avant-dernière SV sortie des chaînes de production. Son numéro de production est 757 et tous les éléments, portières, capots avant et arrière, ailettes de capot arrière portent le même numéro. Nous sommes en face d'un exemplaire exceptionnel à tous points de vue puisqu'elle n'a parcouru que 5 600 km depuis sa sortie d'usine. Vendue neuve au Guatemala, via le concessionnaire Lamborghini, Herrera, de Madrid, le 22 septembre 1972, cette SV est livrée dans son superbe coloris Rosso Granada avec intérieur en cuir beige, air conditionné, radio Autovox, ceintures de sécurité : tout est indiqué sur la facture originale qui sera fournie au futur acquéreur. La voiture est ensuite achetée et importée par un Belge dénommé Galina (document original d'importation fourni) le 9 février 1990. Il la garde pendant onze ans (nouvelle peinture dans la couleur d'origine dans cette période-là) avant de la vendre à l'actuel propriétaire en 2001. Le mécanicien du vendeur, Franck Opderbeck, remplace alors les étriers, tout le circuit de refroidissement dont la tuyauterie est fabriquée en inox, révise complètement l'allumage et la carburation ainsi que la climatisation et change le vase d'expansion. Les quatre pneus n'ont que 1000 km. Cet exemplaire de troisième main seulement est certainement la plus belle Miura SV en circulation, affichant un kilométrage d'origine des plus faibles, un intérieur jamais remplacé et strictement d'origine dans un état époustouflant. Elle est " matching numbers " en tous points et fonctionne de manière optimale, nous l'avons constaté lors de l'essai effectué pour le film. A son volant, tous vos sens sont sollicités : l'odorat, dès que vous prenez place dans son baquet, le parfum de l'authenticité vous pénètre, le toucher avec la caresse du volant gainé de cuir et la douceur du pommeau de vitesse, la vue avec votre regard attiré par les voluptueuses courbes du capot et le moteur vibrant dans le rétroviseur, l'ouïe pour la musique époustouflante du V12 et ses montées en régime et enfin…le goût parce qu'il s'agit simplement de la dévorer à moins qu'elle ne vous dévore avant. Il est clair qu'il s'agit du modèle le plus désirable et le plus abouti de cette lignée de GT dont le dessin magistral signé Gandini a marqué à jamais l'histoire de l'automobile. Un mythe… et une réalité. Carte grise française The definitive Lamborghini Miura P400, fitted by Bertone with virile yet sensuous bodywork designed by Marcello Gandini, created a sensation when it was unveiled at the Geneva Motor Show in 1966. Its mechanical characteristics were equally top-grade. Ferruccio Lamborghini had been keen to impress Enzo Ferrari, who had voiced scepticism about his ability as a constructor. He did just that. The Miura's technical specifications were totally different from cars being produced at Maranello, which were designed for the road and had only recently acquired independent rear wheels. The Miura's elaborate chassis was both rigid and lighter than Ferrari's tubular chassis, and the engine's mid-mounted positioning (rear wheel drive) would prove a landmark. Its rack-and-pinion steering was also superior to its rivals' when it came to precision and response. The 12-cylinder, 4-litre V/ACT engine (initially designed by Giotto Bizzarrini), which already equipped the 400 GT, had been upped to 350bhp in the standard version, and 430bhp in the Sprint version (manufacturer's contemporary data). It was a bijou of mechanical construction: a single piece cast in light alloy, uniting the cylinder blocks, sump and transaxle. The ensemble required high-precision machining and mounting, and each Miura was assembled manually, like a prototype. The new Lamborghini caused quite a stir, promptly becoming the must-own supercar amongst those who could afford it - both for its performance- levels and its style. Ferruccio Lamborghini had every reason to be proud of this matchless creation. Even so, he wanted to go even further and, after various modifications and improvements, came up with the more powerful P400 S in 1969, followed in 1971 by the P400 SV - considered the finest of all Miuras. The refined, dynamic P400 SV had benefited from years of development, and had higher performance-levels. The chassis, axle-units, suspension, aerodynamics, wheels (Campagnolo specials), body detail and smoother engine defined a car that was not necessarily faster (180mph even so), but safer, easier to handle and with better acceleration. Even its designers thought it 'different' from the P400 and P400 S, crediting it with far more rigorous and precise road-holding at high speed. The P400 SV represented the pinnacle of Miura achievement, and was the last Lamborghini produced under Ferruccio Lamborghini's personal supervision - he sold his shares in Automobili Lamborghini SpA in April 1972. This sublime Miura SV 5104 was the sixth-last SV off the production line. Its production number is 757 and all components (doors, front and rear bonnets, rear fins) bear the same number. It is exceptional from every point of view, as it has only done 3,500 miles since leaving the factory. Sold new to Guatemala on 22 September 1972 through Lamborghini's Madrid dealer Herrera, this SV has superb Rosso Granada livery and a beige leather interior, air conditioning, Autovox radio and safety-belts: all mentioned on the original invoice, which the buyer will receive. The car was subsequently bought and imported by a Belgian named Galina (original import document supplied) on 9 February 1990. He kept it for 11 years (repainting it in its original colour) before selling it to the current owner in 2001.The vendor's mechanic, Franck Opderbeck, then replaced the callipers and the entire cooling circuit (with stainless steel pipes), and thoroughly revised the ignition system, carburation and air-conditioning. The four tyres have driven only 625 miles. This example, only third-hand, is surely the finest Miura SV in circulation, with very few miles on the clock and a never-replaced, strictly original interior in dazzling condition. It is 'matching numbers' in every respect, and drives supremely well, as we observed during practice for the film. All five senses are solicited at the wheel: smell - you are assailed by the whiff of authenticity as soon as you sit down; touch - as you handle the leather-lined steering wheel and soft gear-knob; sight - with your eyes attracted to the bonnet's voluptuous curves and the engine vibrating in the rear mirror; hearing - the staggering music of the V12 as it revs up; and finally… taste - you'd better devour this car, or it will devour you first! This is clearly the most desirable and accomplished model from the masterly GT range designed by Gandini, which has left a permanent mark on automobile history. A myth… yet a reality. French registration "carte grise" Estimation 500 000 - 600 000 € Sold for 667,500 €

  • FRAFrance
  • 2010-07-09
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THE WORLD'S MOST FAMOUS ENGRAVED & GOLD INLAID COLT SINGLE ACTION

SN 172485. Cal. 45 Colt. The Sears & Roebuck Colt Single Action Army Revolver, like few other firearms known, has reached near-mythical legend since it was discovered in recent years. It has the belonged to several notable collectors and is almost completely documented from its production in 1897 and shipment to Sears & Roebuck in Chicago where it was used as a promotional item in their advertising & catalogues. Apparently when Sears was no longer using this wonderful piece in their advertising it was relegated to a storeroom or one of the company officials' office displays, it was sold to an unidentified private individual and remained in the Chicago area until 1954 when the famous singer & actor, Mel Torme, learned of its existence through Mr. Ted Busse, a salesman for Klein's Sporting Goods Store in North Chicago. He purchased it after much agonizing for the grand sum of $750.00, a truly substantial amount of money in that day & age when an ordinary Colt Single Action could be purchased for $50.00 or less. This fabulous Colt remained in Mr. Torme's collection until 1975 when he was tempted to sell it to Mr. John Solley for the astronomical sum of $100,000. From Mr. Solley it was sold to David S. Woloch, then to a private collector in Texas and from there to Stanley Shapiro. There are probably other owners between Mr. Shapiro and Dr. Murphy who are unknown at this time. Of the total Pre-WWII production of 357,859 Single Action Army revolver only about a single handful are known with factory engraving and gold inlay. In addition to the Sears & Roebuck colt simply being a superior price, it is also one of the most rare. This fantastic Single Action Army revolver is described as having a 5-1/2" bbl with orig full front sight, 1-line block letter address and the caliber marking on left side. Left side of frame has 2-line patent dates and it is fitted with exceptional 2-pc pearl grips that are unusually Bas relief carved with the figure of seated Columbia holding a staff & cap at her right side. It has D+ coverage spectacular engraving by master engraved Cuno Helfrecht with beautiful intertwined foliate arabesque patterns on frame, recoil shield & loading gate. Top strap has braided rope patterns down each side. The bbl has extensive coverage with foliate arabesque patterns, some of which terminate in flower blossoms with beautiful shell patterns on each side surrounding a diamond & dot checkerboard pattern. Bbl address is very nicely framed with multiple borders of chip & dot, straight lines and feather patterns which terminate toward the muzzle in a figure-8 pattern around front sight. Ejector rod housing has foliate & arabesque patterns at each end with a vine & leaf pattern on outside radius with a snake pattern in top gullet and fine side patterns. Bbl has wide & narrow gold bands at the frame end with a narrow gold band at muzzle. Engraving on the frame itself is outlined with a fine gold wire border and the rampant Colt on left side is within a gold circle. Cylinder is spectacularly engraved with four different patterns of engraving on the lands between the flutes, consisting of three panels of foliate arabesque scrolls, another of flower blossoms & stones, still another of different flowers and the last one of multiple flower, foliate & leaf patterns. The bands between cylinder stop notches & approaches are lightly engraved with foliate arabesque patterns and two fine borders. Rear of cylinder has a feather pattern border between two fine gold bands. Top of back strap is engraved with a beautiful foliate fan pattern outlined in gold wire with foliate arabesque patterns down back strap, at the heel and across buttstrap. Trigger guard is engraved to match with another fan around the frame serial number. All engraving has an extremely fine punch dot background with delicate & fine shadings. Accompanied by its orig gray suede covered, French fitted casing that has a purple satin lining in the lid with gold edged ribbon over center and a purple velvet lined bottom that is recessed for the revolver and a pillow shaped covered cartridge recess in right front. This casing is similar to earlier Colt factory casings. This revolver is pictured in full color on p. 421 of The Colt Engraving Book, Vol. I, Wilson, on pp. 157-159 of Fine Colts The Dr. Joseph A. Murphy Collection, Wilson. Accompanied by three issues of Man at Arms magazine: March/April 1983 which contains a 5-page article on this revolver by R.L. Wilson along with full color center photographs; November/December 1985 which includes the aforementioned advertisement by Clark Cail on p. 11; and September/October 1988 which includes a 2-page guest editorial by Mel Torme wherein he mentions selling this revolver and being presented with a facsimile serial number 172485 for giving a concert at the Benefit Auction Preview for the Metropolitan Museum of Art Department of Arms & Armor in New York in October 1985. That facsimile revolver is being sold immediately following the sale of this revolver, the original. Also accompanied by a Colt Factory letter identifying this revolver, as found, in 45 caliber with 5-1/2" bbl, blue finish, pearl stocks "with carved Goddess of Liberty motif" and engraved and inlaid in gold. It was shipped to Sears Roebuck & Co., Chicago, Illinois, Oct. 23, 1897 in a shipment of one firearm. Also accompanied by a bronze rampant Colt, Colt Collector's Association Award. The bronze stands 14-1/2" high by about 11" wide on a 8-5/8" round walnut base. Additionally accompanied by a small grouping of Sears & Roebuck items including a 2-3/4" x 1-3/4" oval sharpening stone that was a company handout; a 6" x 4-3/8" painted tin tip tray which pictures the Sears & Roebuck store in Chicago and a box of 50 stereoptic viewer cards of the Sears store and catalogue operation including a picture of Mr. R.W. Sears, President of the company. The box has a black paper cover embossed in gold on the lid "A TRIP THROUGH SEARS ROEBUCK & CO." PROVENANCE: Klein's Sporting Goods, Chicago; Mel Torme Collection; John Solley Collection; David S. Woloch Collection; Stanley Shapiro Collection; Dr. Joseph A. Murphy Collection CONDITION: Extremely fine plus. Overall retains about 98% fine orig factory blue, including the frame which is not now and never was case colored. Bbl has slight muzzle edge wear and light wear at front of ejector rod housing. Body of ejector rod housing has a few small scattered spots of chemical staining which has left fine pitting. Frame retains virtually all of its fine orig factory blue, including screw heads. Back strap & butt strap retain about all of their orig factory blue, slightly thinned on back strap. Trigger guard is slightly thinned on trigger bow with a small spot of pitting and some light rust on front strap. Grips are sound with tremendous fire & color with some visible rust staining on both sides that has been present since this revolver was rediscovered. Mechanics are crisp, brilliant shiny bore. Case is lightly soiled on exterior with some slight weakness in fabric over the hinge and some minor damage in recess in bottom around revolver. Bronze and Sears items are all very fine to extremely fine. 4-36438 JR79

  • USAUSA
  • 2009-03-17
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Extremely rare & historically important Winchester Mod. 1866 Saddle

Extremely rare & historically important Winchester Mod. 1866 Saddle Ring Carbine. Forensically proven to have been used at the Battle of the Little Bighorn. Ser. 39618 The Battle of the Little Bighorn was one of the most historic engagement in U. S. military warfare. It not only resulted in the massacre of Custer & his troops, but also marked one of the turning point of life in the United States for its aboriginal Plains tribes. Since that fateful day on June 25th, 1876, any form of artifact related to that battle has been of tremendous interest. Over the years, various firearms have been purported to havebeen used in this battle, but it was not until 1984-85 that proof could be made for any weapons. During that time period, the National Park Service conducted a comprehensive archeological dig on the Custer& Reno-Benteen battlefields excavating nearly 5000 battlefield artifacts. Cartridge cases discovered during this dig were then testedfor potential matches to any guns thought to have been at the battle. A highly sophisticated, forensic examination was conducted by Dr. Douglas Scott & Dick Harmon. In this special examination, each weapon submitted was examined for a match-up with a potential spent casing found at the battlefield. The equipment and techniques used were identical to those used in modern criminology labs. As a result of these very involved testings only fifteen firearms were positively identified as being present at the Battle of Little Bighorn. It is important to note that of these fifteen firearms, ten are in museums, only five are in private hands. ( james D. Julia Auctioneers sold a forensically proven firearm in April 1999 This Winchester is one of the remaining four forensically proven firearms still in private hands and it is important to note that of the fifteen only one was a Winchester 66 The casing that matched this Winchester 66 is referred to as Fs ( field specimen) 2004 It was found in 1985 on the Reno - Benteen defense site in the vicinity of an area known as Sharp Shooters Hill. It is known that Reno and Benteen, after attacking the village were repulsed and took a defensive position outside the village. After various skirmishes and activities, Reno and his troops finally retreated to the top of a hill. There they lay in a depressionshooting down on any Indians that attempted to approach. Unfortunate for them, there was another hill a short distance away, higher up thanthe hill that they were on. This was known as Sharp Shooters Hill, or also Wooden Leg Hill, and it is known that some of the Indians took a position on top of Sharp Shooters Hill and could shoot down onto Reno's troop and thus they managed to kill a number of troopers. The owner of this carbine was one such Indian, since this is where the casing was discovered, on the top of Sharp Shooters Hill. The Indian that possessed this carbine was believed to be a Cheyenne warrior as the engraved stick figures on the receiver ( the medicine of the owner are apparently Cheyenne characters. As indicated earlier, this is theonly model 66 forensically proven to have been there at the battle. The Winchester 66 is probably the most illustrious "Old West" gun. TheIndians greatly admired and appreciated this weapon and referred to them as "Yellow Boys". They were much intrigued with the fact that thegun was a repeater and could fire a number of rounds. Unfortunately, most of the cavalry men who fought against the Indians were utilizing,in many cases, single shot carbines. On more than one occasion, articles that appeared in print quoted cavalry men and/or their officer's complaining about the numbers of these repeating firearms which had become available to the Indians which gave them greater firepower than the troopers. The cartridge casing, Fs 2004, is listed in the book prepared after the archaeological dig entitled "Archaeological Perspectives on the Battle of Little Big Horn" by Douglas D. Scott, Richard A, Fox Jr., Melissa A. Conner and Dick Harmon. This same gun is illustrated in R.L. Wilson's book "The Peacemakers" on page 24in a full color illustration together with a brief write up about it. Also accompanying this lot are various maps of the area with an indication of where the cartridge casing was found Also included is a copy o the book "Archaeological Insights into the Custer Battle" In addition the lot is accompanied by a copy of a notarized letter by N. Joyce Hawthorne and signed by Douglas Scott andDick Harmon attesting that this carbine was forensically proven to have been at the Battle of Little Big Horn. It is also illustrated andmentioned in other articles and books. This very historically important Model 66, unlike many Indian weapons which were frequently much battered, IIIl used and poorly preserved, is in surprisingly goodcondition. The current owner, who was originally involved in the archaeological dig, has owned it for 15 ( fifteen) years. Prior to hisacquiring it, the former owner had possessed it for some 50 to 60 years and it originally came from the Rosebud Reservation. The gun with its original 20in barrel is complete with the standard Winchestermarkings. The rifle buttplate has no number but is original to the stock. The lower tang screw is a replacement. The metal has a blue- brown patina on all iron parts. A dark uniform patina covers the brass The wood has numerous dents and scratches but is still solid, except for a replaced piece at the toe and has a nice old patina The bore is poor. The action is good. The sale of this historic carbine representsan opportunity to the most advanced of Western historical collectors, in particularly, those with a specific interest in items relating to the famous battle fought at the Little Big Horn, a truly unique opportunity. ( illustration titled "It's a Good Day to Die" is of froma painting by noted Western artist and Custer Historian Ralph Heinz ofNewport, Wa) 4-40505 ( open estimate)

  • USAUSA
  • 2000-04-18
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Fresh to the Market, Well-Documented and Extraordinary Factory

Fresh to the Market, Well-Documented and Extraordinary Factory Engraved Special Order Winchester Model 1876 Deluxe Rifle with Factory Letter: The Finest of Its Type Known Deluxe, special order Winchester Model 1876 rifle factory engraved by John Ulrich. This rifle is illustrated in color on page 204 of the 1989 edition of "WINCHESTER ENGRAVING" by R.L. Wilson and on 194 of the 1975 edition of "WINCHESTER ENGRAVING". In addition, the rifle is accompanied by a Cody Firearms Museum letter dated 2017 and a 1973 dated letter from the Winchester Gun Museum. The Cody letter describes "Model 1876, serial number 42491" as: "Type: Rifle, Caliber: 40/60, Barrel Type: Octagon, Trigger: Set, Checkered stock, Pistol grip, Sights: Lyman and Beach and Sporting rear, Casehardened" and "Engraved etc.,". The Cody letter further states that this rifle was shipped from Winchester on January 26, 1885. This rifle has the Third Style receiver with integral dust cover rail and dust cover with serrated edges. The barrel and magazine have a blue finish and the dust cover, loading gate and trigger are fire blue. The forearm cap, receiver, hammer, and lever are casehardened with vivid case colors. The pistol grip stock and forearm are deluxe, highly figured, fancy grade walnut with Winchester "Style H" checkering and a semi-gloss finish. The stock has a full checkered black hard rubber shotgun buttplate and the pistol grip has an ebony inlay. The sides of the forearm cap, top of the dust cover, sides, top and bottom of the receiver and the cartridge elevator are engraved with restrained scrollwork and line borders. The right side of the receiver is engraved with a highly detailed grizzly bear head and the left side of the receiver is engraved with a detailed head of a whitetail buck. The engraving was executed by John Ulrich. The 28-inch, full octagon barrel has a gold-plated Beach folding combination front sight and a buckhorn sporting style rear sight with serrated edges. A Lyman "Combination Tang Peer Sight" with fine knurled post and hinged inner aperture disk is mounted on the receiver tang. The receiver has a single set-trigger. The top barrel flat is roll-stamped: "WINCHESTER'S-REPEATING ARMS. NEW HAVEN. CT./KING'S-IMPROVEMENT-PATENTED-MARCH 29. 1866. OCTOBER 16. 1860." in two lines ahead of the rear sight. "CAL 40-60" is roll-stamped on the top barrel flat between the rear sight and the receiver. "40-60" is roll-stamped in script numerals across the bottom of the brass cartridge elevator. The serial number is stamped in tiny numerals across the lower tang between the lever latch and rear tang screw. This rifle is complete with a custom, French fitted, leather covered oak case. The case exterior has two-tone leather with brass latches and brass reinforcements on the corners. The case has a crimson baize lining and contains two keys in a small compartment with brass handle and empty 20 round carton of Winchester 40-60 cartridges with green picture label. This rifle was formerly part of the Felix Bedlan collection. Manufacturer: Winchester Model: 1876 BBL: 28 inch octagon Stock: walnut checkered pistol grip Gauge: 40-60 WCF Finish: blue/casehardened Grips: Serial Number: 42491 Class: Antique Condition: Utterly magnificent. The barrel and magazine proudly exhibit 98% plus original blue finish showing only the most delicate handling marks. The barrel legend and caliber markings are clear. The dust cover, loading gate and trigger retain 98% plus of the fiery niter blue finish. The forearm cap, receiver, hammer and lever have 98% plus vivid case colors. Wear is limited to some thinning with traces of silver patina on the forward edge of the receiver and some small spots on age discoloration on the bottom of the lever. The exquisitely executed game heads and scroll engraving remain in perfect condition. The deluxe, highly figured walnut stock and forearm are both in excellent condition and retain 98% of the original finish. The checkering on the stock and forearm is extremely sharp. The modern leather covered wooden case is in very good condition. This is a truly magnificent example of a special order, deluxe, factory engraved Winchester Model 1876 rifle that would in fact be impossible to improve upon. The flawlessly executed scrollwork and highly detailed game heads combined with the vivid receiver case colors and overall near mint condition make this Winchester a true marvel, a instant one gun tour de force and collection defining piece. It is Rock island Auction Company's pleasure to present this icon to the collecting community for the first time.

  • USAUSA
  • 2018-04-14
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Spectacular Historic Presentation Cased Factory Engraved Colt Model

Spectacular Historic Presentation Cased Factory Engraved Colt Model 1849 Pocket Percussion Revolver Inscribed to Latter Day Saint Leader and Utah Territory Governor Brigham Young We at Rock Island Auctions are both pleased and fortunate to offer this lot as one of the most historical and iconic firearms ever brought to public sale on behalf of the direct descendants of Brigham Young and in association with Michael Simens and HistoricalArms.com, a personal friend of the Young Family. Its combination of features include embellishment, condition, provenance, history and importance and rival all others that we have successfully offered throughout our many years. This is an extraordinary example of a historic factory engraved Colt Model 1849 Pocket percussion revolver manufactured in 1854 and presented to the famed leader of the Latter Day Saint movement and first governor of the Utah Territory, Brigham Young, by H.E. Dimick & Co., a major St. Louis firearms dealer. Brigham Young, often referred to as ?The American Moses,? was the second leader and president of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church) and served in that capacity from 1844 until his death in 1877. He supervised the migration of Mormon pioneers to the Salt Lake Valley in the Utah territory from Illinois and other staging points across the country and the world. The migration was necessary after many years of community and religious abuse and the murder of first church leader Joseph Smith and his brother by an angry mob followed by the burning of the city of Nauvoo, Illinois. Two years later, Brigham Young, Smith's successor, made the decision to lead the church members on a mass exodus through the Mexican-controlled southwest wilderness that eventually ended in the forming a permanent Latter Day Saint community in the valley of the Great Salt Lake in Utah. On July 24, 1847, the first contingent arrived at their ?Promised Land? when Young and 147 Mormon pilgrims arrived at the Salt Lake Valley. In 1851, the colonizer and founder of ?Great Salt Lake City? was appointed the territory's first governor by President Millard Fillmore. In his lifetime, Brigham Young supervised the trek of nearly 80,000 pioneers to the Salt Lake Valley; founded 400 settlements, towns and cities; established a system of land distribution later ratified by Congress; and served as the first territorial governor of Utah for two terms, as first superintendent of Indian Affairs of Utah Territory, and as Church President for 30 years. With scarce provisions and resources, Brigham organized cooperative efforts to dig canals; construct roads; build telegraph lines, gristmills and tanneries; and established new industries including: cotton and woolen mills, iron foundries, a sugar beet factory and railroads. All of this took place under his personal direction. In a short period of time, he built a country within a country. Young was a human dynamo as a planner and builder of community but also encouraged advancements in human nature, encouraging not only hard work but dance, singing, reading ?and anything else that will expand our frames, add fire to spirit, improve minds and make all citizens feel free and untrammeled in body and mind?. He encouraged woman to study and said, ?We believe that women are useful, not only to sweep houses, wash dishes, make beds, and raise babies, but they should stand behind the counter, study law or physics [medicine], or become good book-keepers . . . And all this to enlarge their sphere of usefulness for the benefit of society at large. In following these things they but answer the design of their creation." He also gave them the vote in 1870 in the State of Utah. To accomplish these feats, Young and his followers exercised their rights as provided in our Constitution and were obviously strong believers in the First and Second Amendments (particularly the Second Amendment to defend the First). This revolver was presented to Young by H.E. Dimick & Company while Young served as Governor of the Utah Territory (1851-1858). Founded in 1849 in St. Louis, H.E. Dimick quickly became the largest firearms dealer west of the Mississippi and attracted a large share of public attention on account of the splendid assortment of firearms that composed their stock. Dimick was popular among mountain men, scouts, fur traders, buffalo hunters and pioneers migrating west in need of firearms and related supplies. It must be assumed that Young, as the Governor of the Utah Territory, would have had specific dealings with Dimick in the supplying of firearms to the Utah Territory. The revolver has deluxe factory floral scroll engraving with punch-dot background and floral accents. Due to its exquisite quality, we believe the engraving was executed by Master Engraver Gustave Young himself, and this gun is consecutively numbered to a gun listed on one of his two existing work-shop sheets from September 1854. The flawlessly executed scrollwork covers the lug and rear two thirds of the barrel, the loading lever flats, the frame, the trigger guard bow and the bottom and upper third of the back strap. The back strap is unquestionably factory, special order inscribed as follows; "Presented to Gov. Young/by H.E. Dimick & Co." The top and sides of the hammer are decorated with Gustave Young's characteristic wolf head motif with beautifully executed additional dog heads on the left side of the frame and barrel. The hammer exhibits deluxe knurling and the screw heads are also engraved. The top barrel flat is presentation style scroll engraved "Saml Colt" surrounded by simple decorative line engraving and the left side of the frame is engraved "COLT'S/PATENT". The serial number (97326) is marked on all major parts, and the correct partial serial number (7326) is on the barrel wedge. The cylinder is roll engraved with the stagecoach holdup scene and marked "COLTS PATENT" over the serial number. The barrel and cylinder are blue. The loading lever, frame and hammer are casehardened, and the trigger guard and back strap are silver plated brass. It is fitted with a smooth one-piece antique ivory grip. The partitioned deluxe rosewood case is lined in red wine velvet and is presentation inscribed to Young. The top of the lid has a brass inscription plaque that reads, "Gov. Young/G.S.L.C./Utah Ter." Interestingly, the city was named by Young himself, ?Great Salt lake City? upon Young?s arrival to the valley, hence the decorated initials ?G.S.L.C.? on the plaque. The name was later shortened to its current title. The case has brass hardware including the corner protectors on the lid. The case holds the revolver, silver or German silver powder flask, two cavity "COLTS/PATENT" brass bullet mold, combination screwdriver and nipple wrench, Eley percussion cap tin, nipple pick, cleaning rod and a small knife blade from a dress knife and file often used as a watch fob marked ?G. Wostenholm, I.X.L.? The gun is accompanied with an un-impeachable letter of provenance from the great grandson of Brigham Young and a period ID card that was displayed with the set in the Young household on special occasions. This is the personal Colt revolver that Brigham Young received as a gift; that he personally cleaned, loaded and kept at-the-ready and would undoubtedly have used when necessary to protect himself, his family and those who might need it from nefarious persons as was his Constitutional right. Manufacturer: Colt Model: 1849 BBL: 4 inch octagon Stock: Gauge: 31 percussion Finish: blue/casehardened/silver Grips: antique ivory Serial Number: 97326 Class: Antique Condition: Excellent to near mint. The revolver retains 97% of its bright, original high polished blue finish with some scattered high edge wear and an extremely thin line of toning on its cylinder where it laid in its case. It even retains most of the blue in its bore and chambers. The frame, loading lever and hammer retain nearly all of their original, early style case colors. The grip straps retain nearly all of their original silver plating. The grip is excellent with a highly attractive color and grain pattern. The gun is mechanically excellent. The case is very fine with minor handling/storage marks overall and some high spot wear to the lining. The accessories are all very fine. We cannot speak too highly of this remarkable and iconic American weapon. Its magnificent features would be hard to improve upon by any measure, and place it as a potential centerpiece to any antique Colt or Americana museum collection! Its rarity, form, embellishment, history, provenance and high condition cannot be underestimated!

  • USAUSA
  • 2016-04-30
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Annonce

1836 $5 Ultra Cameo PF-67★ NGC

1836 $5 Ultra Cameo PF-67★ NGC William Kneass, designer (after John Reich); refined by Christian Gobrecht Obverse: Head of Liberty facing left, her hair bound in a fillet on which LIBERTY is inscribed, her hair curled and falling to the base of her neck; around, thirteen stars; below, 1836. Reverse: Heraldic eagle, head facing left, with shield emblazoned on its chest holding olive branch and three arrows in its talons; around, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA; below, 5 D. Condition: NGC Proof 67★ Ultra Cameo (Certificate number: 1963262-002 – Photo Proof 10-05; previous Photo Proof 10-07 [number 2019387-009] "This delightful proof is the only one certified by NGC, confirming its important status." Deeply mirrored, almost 'black' limpid fields highlight the richly frosted designs. Struck from incredibly dense, dark gold, with dies so fresh that a few raised die polish lines are still visible (these are part of the manufacturing process and not defects). Star nine slightly flat, which is a feature shared by all the known examples. A spectacular coin without peer. References: This Coin Published: Garrett & Guth (Encyclopedia) p. 286. Other references: Breen (Encyclopedia) 6510; Breen (Proofs) p. 65 (this example unknown); Akers (1979) pp. 86-87. (PCGS 45300) Condition Census: The finest known. NGC has graded no other examples as perfectly preserved as this piece; the other Proof 67 graded by NGC (probably the Pittman example) lacks both the Ultra Cameo and star designations; PCGS has graded nothing even remotely as fine (Proof 63 cameo, the finest). (07-13) Rarity: Of the highest rarity. Breen (in both Proofs and Encyclopedia) knew of only two examples, that in the National Coin Collection in the Smithsonian, and the example he identified as 'NY Specialist' (John J. Pittman). Akers (1979) concurred, but when he sold the Pittman Collection (1997), he cited the existence of a third example and, more recently (2000) a fourth (not nearly as fine as the other three) was discovered. The list of known examples includes the National Coin Collection (Smithsonian) example; John J. Pittman (Part 1 [October 1997], lot 938); Brian Hendelson, 1996 (this coin), as part of a complete proof set; Harry Bass Collection (Part 4 [November 2000], lot 344). Only three auction appearances of this exceptionally rare issue have been recorded since the Farouk sale in 1954. As with the proof quarter eagle of 1836 in the present sale (lot 1002), for a number of years NGC had not deleted the original certification number for this coin when it was re-holdered in 2007. This gave the false impression that there was another coin as perfectly preserved as the Tacasyl coin. NGC has corrected this error, confirming the unique finest-known status of this amazing coin. Provenance: The Rarities Sale, Bowers and Merena Galleries, July 31, 2000, lot 580 (part); prior to August 2000, the complete 8-piece set was sold to a private collector for a reported $1,000,000 (according to PCGS Coin Facts website); Brian Hendelson, 1996; Anonymous Philadelphia family (as part of a complete 1836 proof set, owned since the date of issue). Note: The design development of the Classic Head half eagle is essentially the same as the quarter eagle (described above in lot 1002). As has been explained in some detail by Breen (Encyclopedia), the passage of the Mint Act of June 28, 1834 (which reduced the weight and purity of all gold coins) required the production of a substantial number of new dies which would clearly differentiate the new issues from the 'old tenor' coinage. The re-use of John Reich's Empire head (which Breen, peculiarly, saw as androgynous), and the elimination of the motto, E PLURIBUS UNUM, were the two distinctly new design elements. Producing the large number of dies was a chore as so many different design elements had to be imparted by hand and over the short life of the design numerous small adjustments were made, first by Kneass and then, following his stroke in August 1835, by Christian Gobrecht, who created a series of transitional designs which culminated with his coronet design in 1839. Although the specific authorization and purpose for the striking of Proof coins in 1836 has thus far eluded researchers (Breen [Proofs] suggested sets may have produced early in the year to celebrate the admission of Arkansas as a state, or late in the year in anticipation of Michigan's admission), it is logical to infer that they were produced for presentation purposes, possibly, as with the 1834/1804 proof sets as diplomatic gifts. The two 1836 gold proofs in this sale have been together since the year they were struck, and together represent the finest 1836 gold proof set obtainable.

  • USAUSA
  • 2013-09-24
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The Finest Iron Frame Henry Lever Action Rifle in Existence

The Finest Iron Frame Henry Lever Action Rifle in ExistenceThis is an extraordinary example of an iron frame Henry Lever Action Rifle manufactured by the New Haven Arms Company. Experts believe that the New Haven Arms Company manufactured between 200 and 400 iron frame Henry rifles. Serial numbers of known iron frame Henry rifles range from 2 to 355. Henry rifle authorities speculate that the New Haven Arms Company contracted with outside sources (Colt or the Arcade Malleable Iron Co.) for production of iron receivers, buttplates and other components due to initial difficulties in obtaining equipment to manufacture the larger components required for the new Henry rifle. The iron frame Henry rifles were sold concurrently with the more common brass frame rifles and discontinued a few months into production. The iron frame Henry rifle is the rarest and most desirable of all Henry rifle variations. The 24 inch octagon barrel and integral magazine, iron receiver and iron buttplate have a high polish blue finish. The few surviving Henry rifles in collections today rarely retain more than trace amounts of the original blue finish on the receiver and buttplate. This impressive rifle retains virtually all of the original blue finish applied by the New Haven Arms Company. The loading lever, trigger and hammer are color casehardened. The straight grain walnut stock has a high polish varnish piano finish. This rifle displays the distinctive features found on the earliest Henry rifles. Both the barrel and the receiver have rear sight dovetails. The folding leaf rear sight mounted in the barrel dovetail is the first variation with "1000" yard marking below the center notch, elevation bar with rounded edges and small "V" notch. The nickel silver front sight is the first pattern half moon style. The magazine has the early style small brass cartridge follower and the receiver has the early straight follower cut. In addition to the rear sight dovetail, the upper rear portion of the receiver has the slight bevel in front of the hammer found on early rifles. The receiver has the small trigger retaining pin. The loading lever is the first style with no spur and the lower receiver tang lacks the lever latch added around serial number "400". The iron buttplate is the first style with rounded heel. The cleaning rod hole in the stock has the beveled opening found on iron frame rifles. The buttplate has the early style hand fitted screws. The three tang screws are the early style used on the first Henry rifles. All of the screws appear to be indexed with the slots aligned with the axis of the bore. The rifle lacks the sling swivel on the left side of the stock and the sling hook loop on the left side of the barrel that were special order items on early production rifles. The top of the barrel is roll stamped with the two-line legend "HENRY'S PATENT. OCT. 16.1860/MANUFACT'D BY THE NEWHAVEN ARMS CO. NEWHAVEN. CT." ahead of the rear sight. The markings are the small first style format that features "NEWHAVEN" in block letters and the remainder of the legend in serifed letters. The serial number "49" is stamped on the top barrel flat between the front sight and the receiver. The rifle was not disassembled to examine the serial numbers on the tang screws, lower tang, stock, buttplate screws and buttplate. Included with the rifle is a rare four piece hickory Henry cleaning rod in nearly new condition. Provenance: Mac McCroskie CollectionManufucture: New Haven Arms Co.Model: Henry RifleBBL: 24 inch octagonStock: walnutGuage: 44 Henry RFFinish: blue/casehardenedGrips: Serial Number: 49

  • USAUSA
  • 2013-09-15
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Winchester 1866 Rifle 44 rimfire- Stunning

Stunning, Documented Factory Panel Scene Engraved, Gold Plated, Maple Stocked and Cased Winchester Deluxe Model 1866 Factory "On The Rocky Mountains" Display Lever Action Rifle This is an extraordinary example of the iconic "On the Rocky Mountains" deluxe factory panel scene engraved Winchester Model 1866 Lever Action rifle that was manufactured in 1871. This Model 1866 rifle has the flared receiver front, moderate curve at the rear of the frame and serial number stamped on the lower tang behind the trigger. The rifle has a full octagon barrel and full length magazine. The barrel has a nickel silver front sight blade and round top, Henry style folding leaf rear sight with center notch and elevator bar stop screw. The upper receiver tang is factory drilled for a tang sight with filler screws present. Factory sling swivels are mounted on the stock and forearm tip. The crescent buttplate has a hinged butt trapdoor. The top barrel flat is roll-stamped: "WINCHESTER'S-REPEATING ARMS. NEW HAVEN. CT./KING'S-IMPROVEMENT-PATENTED-MARCH 29. 1866. OCTOBER 16. 1860" in two lines. The serial number "79862" is stamped on the lower tang in an engraved ribbon surrounded by flourishes. The left side of the tang is marked ?XXXX?. The brass receiver, buttplate and forearm tip are gold plated, and the barrel and magazine are blued. The loading gate and bolt have a fire blue finish, and the hammer, trigger and lever are color casehardened. The frame and buttplate screws are fire blue. Quite impressively, the full serial number is marked on the inside of the buttplate and the stock inlet. The stock and forearm are extraordinarily rare fancy grade birdseye maple with a high gloss piano finish. The forearm tip, receiver and buttplate heel feature deluxe, presentation grade scroll and border engraving with four highly detailed game scenes. The left side of the receiver has a mule deer in a circle with elaborate borders, and the left side plate is engraved with a bear hunting scene entitled "ON THE ROCKY MOUNTAINS". The right side plate has a round panel scene that depicts a buck and doe mule deer in a woodland glade, and a round panel on the forward portion of the receiver depicts a hound on point. The area surrounding the game scenes, top and bottom of the receiver, upper and lower tang, sides of the forearm tip and buttplate heel are extensively engraved with highly detailed scrollwork on a stippled background bordered with waved lines, circles and dot motifs. A fox is incorporated in the scrollwork on the right rear of the receiver, and a running hare is engraved on the left rear of the receiver. The game scenes on this rifle are very similar to those on Model 1866 rifles engraved by Conrad F. Ulrich. However, a detailed description of this rifle prepared by Winchester engraving expert R.L. Wilson suggests that this rifle was engraved by John Ulrich. This rifle is complete with a French-fitted, burl walnut, brass bound case with ebony trim on the edges. The case interior is lined with green velvet and contains four 26-round cartridge blocks with eight cartridges, screwdriver and spare handle and a compartment with wooden lid with a four piece Winchester jointed steel cleaning rod. This rifle is illustrated on page 144 of "Winchester Engraving" by R.L. Wilson. The Wilson description with this rifle states: "In rarity, quality, design, condition and importance serial number 79862 ranks among the finest of Model 1866 deluxe Winchester firearms. The rifle is also featured in George Madis' "The Winchester Book" on page 76. Manufacturer: Winchester Model: 1866 BBL: 24 inch octagon Stock: maple Gauge: 44 RF Finish: blue/gold-plated Grips: Serial Number: 79862 Class: Antique Condition: Exceptionally fine overall. The barrel and magazine retain 85% plus of the original blue finish with the balance having aged to a plum-blue patina. The barrel legend is crisp. The loading gate has 70% of the original nitre blue finish, and substantial amounts are present on the breech bolt. Most of the mottled case colors remain on the hammer. The case colors on the trigger and lever have aged to a brown patina. The delicate original gold-plated finish on the forearm tip, receiver and buttplate shows wear on contact points but remains at least 90% complete. The intricate and flawlessly-executed game scenes, scrollwork and borders are deep and crisp. The rarely encountered birdseye maple stock and forearm are both excellent and retain at least 95% of the piano finish. The fancy grain walnut case is good overall with scattered, minor scratches and handing marks. The ebony trim-pieces on the ends of the lid have been removed but are present in the case storage compartment. The case interior is very good overall. The lining is clean and bright. Wear is limited to several small tears from contact with the rifle hammer, muzzle and sling swivels. This is a stunning example of the highest grade of a Winchester Model 1866 Lever Action Rifle. This rifle was created to display the quality of firearms manufactured by the Winchester Repeating Arms Company. After the passage of more than 140 years, it continues to achieve that goal. Provenance: The Press Collection and Robert M. Lee Collection.

  • USAUSA
  • 2017-05-06
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1891 $20 Ultra Cameo PF-68â605 NGC

1891 $20 Ultra Cameo PF-68★ NGC James B. Longacre, William Barber, designers Obverse: Head of Liberty facing left, wearing a bejeweled coronet on which LIBERTY is emblazoned; around, thirteen stars; below, 1891. Reverse: Heraldic eagle, head facing left, with spread wings and shield emblazoned on its chest holding olive branch and three arrows in its talons; above, IN GOD WE / TRUST in two lines within an oval of thirteen stars amidst rays of Glory; around, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA; below, TWENTY DOLLARS. Condition: NGC Proof 68★ Ultra Cameo (Certificate number: 1963253-015 – Photo Proof 10-07; previous certificate number [on or before 11-05]: 1704497-001). An absolutely amazing, nearly indescribable gem of the first water. An intense, razor-sharp strike, fathomless, mirrored surfaces with devices that are as richly and fully frosted as can be imagined. A minuscule (mint-caused) dimple on Liberty's cheek is diagnostic, which with an infinitesimal (also mint-caused) depression to the right of the upper serif of the F in OF serve as pedigree points of identification. Virtually as perfect as the day it left the dies. Immaculate, and by consensus without peer. References: This Coin Published: Breen (Proofs) p. 192, 7; Akers (1982) p. 199; Garrett & Guth (Encyclopedia) p. 505 ("Finest Proof $20 ever seen."); Bowers (Guide Book of Double Eagles) p. 183, this piece illustrated . Other references: Breen (Encyclopedia) 7307. (PCGS 99107) Condition Census: The finest known, not only for the date, but for the entire Liberty Head series (1850-1907): Jeff Garrett has lauded it as the "The finest Proof $20 ever seen." Needless to say, this is the finest graded by NGC, and PCGS has graded none finer than Proof 66. A review of the combined census reports for both NGC and PCGS reveals that of the more than one million Liberty Head double eagles graded (both proof and business strikes) a mere six have been graded as 68, and this example gains pride of place as the only example with the star designation; simply put, no Liberty Head double eagle has ever been certified as perfectly preserved as this coin. (07-13) Rarity: Extremely rare, one of the key dates of the entire denomination, with a mere 1,390 business strikes and 52 proofs produced. Breen (Proofs) specifically identified fourteen examples (including the present lot); Akers (1982) estimated a survival of 20 to 25 pieces, an estimate with which more recently Garrett and Guth have concurred. Regardless of the number of survivors of the date, this specimen, which has been published as the most perfectly preserved of all Liberty head proof double eagles is, for all intents and purposes, unique. Provenance: The Clausen Family Collection, Heritage, January 5, 2006, lot 3581, PR68★ Ultra Cameo NGC (11-05)[certificate number: 1704497-001], "Spectacular ... phenomenal ... virtually flawless" ($299,000); Harry W. Bass, Jr. Collection, Part II, Bowers and Merena, October 2-4, 1999, lot 1906 Proof-67 PCGS, "Memorable ... incredible ... no peer" ($166,750); Gaston DiBello Collection, Stack's, May 14-16, 1970, lot 1281; believed to be (according to Breen [Proofs]) "A Memorable Collection" [Jacob Shapiro/J.F. Bell], Numismatic Galleries [Abe Kosoff and Abner Kreisberg], March 1-2, 1948, lot 711. Note: The 1891 Double Eagle displays the third and last design change for the Liberty head double eagles. In 1877 the reverse design was altered to spell out the denomination in full: TWENTY DOLLARS. Since the denomination's inception as a circulating coin in 1850, for reasons unknown the value had only been abbreviated TWENTY D. It may be that Mint officials used the abbreviated version to keep a degree of uniformity with the other then-circulating denominations (quarter eagle through eagle) which also abbreviated the word dollar (of course the tiny gold dollar, which was developed as a contemporary of the double eagle, had the word spelled out in full from the start, as did the three dollar gold piece). The larger size of the double eagle planchet would certainly have not been an impediment to spelling it out in full (as the re-design in 1877 proves). In 1891 the design had another 16 years to run before Theodore Roosevelt hatched his plan to have Saint-Gaudens design a coin worthy of the ancients (though ironically the inspiration for Liberty's portrait on this coin was the enormous cult statue heads of the ancient Romans).

  • USAUSA
  • 2013-09-24
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1962 MERCEDES BENZ 300 SL ROADSTER AVEC HARD TOP

¤ 1962 MERCEDES BENZ 300 SL ROADSTER AVEC HARD TOP Châssis n° 198 042 10 003 070 Moteur n° 198 982 0000 025 en aluminium En 1954, au Salon de New York, l'importateur de voitures de luxe et de sport européennes, Max Hoffman présente deux nouvelles Mercedes de sport : la 190 SL et la 300 SL de route. Celle-ci est une adaptation à usage routier de la 300 SL de compétition qui se caractérise par ses portes " papillon ". Quoique plus civilisée que les voitures d'usine, la 300 SL client reste une voiture pour amateurs de pilotage dans laquelle le confort a été sacrifié à l'efficacité. Notamment l'accès à bord reste difficile en raison de la hauteur des seuils de porte et cette seule particularité en limite la diffusion aux Etats-Unis, son principal marché. Mercedes-Benz en écoule quand même 1 400 exemplaires en quatre ans, mais confronté à une baisse de la demande en 1956, le constructeur cède encore aux pressions américaines et en propose une version décapotable, le Roadster, présenté à Genève en mars 1957. Sa particularité la plus visible réside dans l'adoption de portes conventionnelles grâce à une modification du châssis par ailleurs renforcé pour compenser l'élimination du toit. Ce splendide cabriolet d'allure aussi musclée que le coupé " papillon ", s'adresse à une clientèle plus férue de grand tourisme que de performances, mais la partie mécanique déjà raffinée a encore été améliorée. Le moteur toujours alimenté par injection directe délivre 250 ch SAE et les derniers roadsters de 1962-63 recevront un bloc en aluminium et quatre freins à disque. La vitesse de pointe d'environ 230 km/h convient largement à un cabriolet grand tourisme. Une autre importante amélioration concerne l'adoption d'un nouveau train arrière, toujours du type à essieu brisé, mais dont le point d'articulation a été abaissé et qui comporte en plus un ressort compensateur horizontal. Les variations de carrossage à l'arrière sont réduites et la tenue de route en virage devient moins … surprenante ! Ces raffinements mécaniques attirent une nouvelle clientèle et les ventes du Roadster atteindront 1858 exemplaires soit 400 de plus que celles du coupé " papillon ". Grâce à ses qualités routières, à son agrément de conduite et à son style d'une rare élégance insensible au passage du temps, la 300 SL Roadster voit sa cote se renforcer constamment. La voiture présentée est une 300 SL Roadster 1962 à bloc aluminium (matching numbers) et freins à disque dont la restauration confiée au Garage Dupertuis à Aigle (Suisse) a été facturée en mai 2005 pour un montant total de plus de CHF38,000. Le dossier très détaillé qui accompagne la voiture précise notamment les travaux mécaniques suivants (sous-traités à Duam Motor SA) : démontage complet du moteur suite (pour cause de fonctionnement insatisfaisant) et nettoyage chimique et sablage, rectification du volant moteur, honage des cylindres, réfection des pistons (gorges et segmentation, axes et arrêtoirs), traitement des pistons au molygraphite, montage et ajustage des coussinets de bielles et de paliers, réfection des bielles, équilibrage de l'ensemble vilebrequin-embrayage, réfection des passages d'huile, commande de distribution (pignon et chaine), réfection des soupapes, des sièges et des culbuteurs, remplacement du filtre à air métallique par un élément moderne, réfection du système d'injection (pompes et injecteurs) et des canalisations d'essence et d'huile, réfection de l'allumage, embrayage neuf, révision et remise en état de la commande de démarrage, révision des freins et réglage de la direction (timonerie et géométrie), installation d'un coupe-circuit, mise au point, etc. Il s'agit du meilleur modèle et de la plus aboutie des 300 SL Roadster. La peinture gris métallisé ainsi que l'intérieur cuir noir sont en superbe état. Il est très rare de trouver un roadster à bloc alu et freins à disques, accompagné en plus de son hard-top dont le propriétaire avait installé un système de stockage mobile, permettant de le poser sans effort sur la caisse. Plus qu'une automobile, un mythe. Cette automobile est livrée avec un titre de circulation suisse, les droits et taxes à l'importation seront à acquitter par l'acheteur dans le pays de destination It was Max Hoffman, an importer of European luxury sports and cars, who presented two new Mercedes sports models at the 1954 New York Auto Show: the 190 SL and the 300 SL Roadster. The latter was an adaptation, for road use, of the 300 SL sports car with its distinctive 'gull-wing' doors. Although more civilized than a factory car, the 300 SL remained a car for drivers who preferred performance over comfort. In fact, access remained tricky due to the height of the doors, which limited sales in the United States, its principal market. Mercedes-Benz nonetheless sold 1,400 cars in four years but, faced with a slump in demand in 1956, again bowed to American pressure and proposed a convertible version, the Roadster, unveiled in Geneva in March 1957. The most visible feature was its conventional doors, made possible by changes to the chassis, now strengthened to compensate for the removal of the roof. This splendid cabriolet, just as rugged in appearance as the 'gull-wing' coupé, targeted clients more interested in a grand tourer than a racing car. Even so, the refined mechanics had been further improved. The engine, still using direct injection, delivered 250bhp SAE, while the last roadsters of 1962/3 would receive an aluminium block and four disc brakes. A top speed of over 140mph was ample for cabriolet gran turismo. Another major improvement concerned the adoption of a new rear end, still of the broken-axle type but with a lowered articulation point and horizontal compensator spring. Variations to the rear body were reduced, and road-holding around bends became less… unpredictable. These mechanical refinements attracted a new clientèle, and sales of the Roadster reached 1,858 - 400 more than for the 'gull-wing' coupé. Thanks to its qualities on the road, easy driving, and timeless elegance, the popularity of the 300 SL Roadster continued to climb. The car offered here is a 1962 300 SL Roadster with disc brakes and aluminium block (matching numbers), restored by Garage Dupertuis in Aigle (Switzerland) at a cost of over CHF38,000 in May 2005. The detailed dossier that comes with the car contains a break-down of the following mechanical work carried out (sub-contracted to Duam Motor SA): full dismantlement and cleaning of the engine suite (due to unsatisfactory performance); resurfacing of the flywheel; honing of the cylinders; repairing of pistons (grooves, segmentation, pawls); molygraphite treatment of pistons; mounting and adjusting of connecting-rod bushings and main bearings; repairing of connecting rods; balancing of crankshaft/clutch; repairing of oil passages, distribution (drive pinion and chain); repairs to valves and rocker arms; replacing of metal air-filter by a modern filter; repairs to injection system (pumps and injectors) and the oil and fuel passages; repair of ignition; new clutch; repair of starter; checking brakes and correcting the steering; installing a cut-out switch, etc. This is the finest and the most accomplished of the 300 SL Roadsters. The metallic grey paintwork and black leather interior are in superb condition. It is rare to find a roadster with an aluminium block and disc brakes, and this one also has a hard-top with mobile storage system installed by the owner. More than an automobile - a myth! This car is coming with Swiss registration papers, import duties and taxes will apply to the buyer in the country of destination Estimation 430 000 - 500 000 € Sold for 502,302 €

  • FRAFrance
  • 2010-07-09
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Colt Paterson Revolver 36 percussion

Exceptionally Rare and Magnificent, Documented Silver-Banded, Factory Cased Colt No. 5 Squareback Model Texas Paterson Percussion Revolver This exceptional revolver is one of approximately 1,000 Texas Paterson revolvers manufactured by Samuel Colt's Patent Arms Manufacturing Company from 1838-40. The No. 5 Holster Model revolvers were the largest of all the Paterson handguns and achieved fame as a result of their use by Captain Jack Hays and other Rangers on the Texas frontier. In fact, a major purchaser of the No. 5 was the Republic of Texas. Samuel Walker was familiar with the No. 5 during his days as a Texas Ranger and used the revolver to great effect. His experience with the Paterson persuaded him to advocate for a larger, quicker loading revolver powerful enough to kill either a man or horse with a single shot. His discussions with Samuel Colt led to the Colt Walker Model revolver in 1847. What followed next was a rapid evolution in revolver design spearhead by Colt who introduced the Dragoon series of revolvers that were based on the Walker design. Samuel Walker is often credited for establishing early Colt revolvers as an effective handgun. The Walker and Dragoon revolvers definitely provided Colt with financial relief and fame. This particular No. 5 revolver was once owned by Francis Bannerman. It is illustrated and described in detail on pages 80-83 of "The Art of the Gun: Magnificent Colts Volume I" by Robert M. Lee and R.L. Wilson. The revolver has a high polish blue finish on the barrel, frame, cylinder, and grip strap. The hammer is color casehardened. The five-shot, square back cylinder is roll-engraved with the stagecoach holdup scene. German silver bands are inlaid on the barrel at the muzzle, on the top of the barrel at the breech, on the underside of the barrel lug curves and on the recoil shields. An oval German silver escutcheon is inlaid on the back strap. The barrel has a German silver front sight blade. The two-piece grip is fancy grain walnut with a high polish piano finish. The straight sided barrel has a distinctive double curved lug with no provision for a loading lever. The top of the barrel is roll-stamped "- Patent Arms M'g. Co. Paterson, N.J. - Colt's Pt. -" reading from the breech to the muzzle with ?star & snake? terminals at either end of the legend. The top of the cylinder is marked "COLT" in addition to the roll-engraved stagecoach scene. The serial number "141" is visible on: (1) the rear face of the barrel lug, (2) bottom of the cylinder wedge, (3) bottom of the frame in the trigger well, (4) inside of the trigger, (5) rear face of the cylinder, (6) inside of the hammer and (7) bottom of the left grip heel. All of the visible serial numbers match. The revolver is complete with a mahogany Paterson style case with beveled lid and scalloped German silver escutcheon plate. The case is lined with dark blue velvet with wire clips to retain the accessories. The case contains: (1) spare five-shot, square back cylinder marked ?J./201" on the rear face, (2) brass cleaning rod with turned wooden head, (3) .36 caliber, single cavity, round ball iron bullet mold with three wooden handles, (4) Paterson combination tool with fire blue finish, (5) side-latch brass Colt capper marked "No. 333" on the inside of the body and lid, (6) distinctive Paterson copper and brass combination powder and ball flask numbered "16" on both the upper and lower sections and roll-stamped with the same Patent Arms Co. legend with ?star & snake? terminals as the top barrel flat and (7) several .36 caliber lead balls that were originally in the flask. Manufacturer: Colt Model: Paterson BBL: 9 inch octagon Stock: Gauge: 36 percussion Finish: blue Grips: walnut Serial Number: 141 Class: Antique Condition: Very fine. This revolver remains in exceptionally fine condition, appears to be un-fired and retains 70% of the original high polish blue finish. The blue on the barrel is thin with some cleaning overall, but the metal surfaces are smooth and the edges are crisp. The barrel legend is extremely sharp. The cylinder retains nearly all of the stagecoach scene and has about 90% of the blue finish. The front and rear face of the cylinder and the percussion nipples show no trace of flash pitting or firing wear. The frame and back strap retain more than 90% of the high polish blue finish; the face of the recoil shield, top of the frame and the cylinder pin are in the same excellent condition as the exterior surfaces and show no wear. The hammer has nearly 95% of the original case colors with no flash pitting. The nicely figured walnut grip is in very fine with some scattered finish flaking. The visible serial numbers on all components are sharp. The factory case is fine. The case exterior has a few scattered and minor handling and storage marks, and the interior has some oil stains and compression marks but no serious wear. The spare cylinder has some flash pitting on the percussion nipples and the front and rear face but retains 100% of the stagecoach scene and nearly 80% of the blue finish. The cleaning rod remains very fine. The bullet mold has traces of blue finish on the blocks and sprue cutter while the wooden handles show minimal wear. The excellent combination tool retains 90% of the nitre blue finish. The capper is fine, complete, and original with an attractive, un-polished patina and sharp markings. The rare Paterson combination powder and ball flask is excellent and retains nearly 90% plus original of the bright original gold plated finish with crisp markings and serial numbers. This is a truly exceptional example of the most desirable of all Colt Paterson firearms - the Texas Paterson revolver. The combination of un-fired condition, rare German silver inlays, and factory case with rare accessories make this one of the finest of all Paterson revolvers extant. Provenance: Robert M. Lee Collection.

  • USAUSA
  • 2017-05-06
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Iconic, Historic and Exceptional Colt Civilian Walker Serial Number

Iconic, Historic and Exceptional Colt Civilian Walker Serial Number 1078 with Magnificent Period Holster: Popularly Known as "The Thumb Print Walker".Historians, collectors, investment brokers/buyers, history buffs and general firearms enthusiasts take note. Before you is without question the most rare and arguably most historic Colt Walker Revolver we at Rock Island Auction have had the privilege to offer. It is the most difficult of all Colt revolvers to obtain, the gun most collectors can only fantasize to own, a gun so rare that even the most advanced collectors have never had the opportunity to own one. We proudly present to you the iconic Colt Civilian Walker serial number 1078 popularly known as "The Thumbprint Walker". The story of the Walker pistol forever changed course of American history and firearms design. It involves a young gallant U.S. Army officer Samuel Hamilton Walker, a brilliant second generation inventor and manufacturer Eli Whitney Jr and thrusted a young unsuccessful (up until this point) but ambitious entrepreneur to the forefront of American manufacturing, one of the first American business tycoons: Col. Samuel Colt . The U.S. 1847 Walker Model Colt design was developed by Samuel Colt and influenced by suggestions from the former Texas Ranger Samuel Hamilton Walker who was serving as a Captain in the Regiment of Mounted Riflemen (whom had quite a lot of experience with the Paterson revolver). On December 7, 1846 Colt met with President James K. Polk to promote his revolver. President Polk directed Secretary of War William L. Marcy to order 1000 revolvers from Colt thru the Ordnance Department. This order marked the beginning of the relationship between Colt and the U.S. military which exists to this day. Colt made arrangements for the revolvers to be manufactured by Eli Whitney at the Whitneyville Armory. The original intent was to issue two revolvers per man to the Mounted Rifle Regiment; the revolvers were marked "A Company-D Company" with "E Company" numbered 1-120. Whitney manufactured 220 pairs of revolvers marked "A Company-D Company" and 120 revolvers marked "E Company" for a total of 1000 revolvers. The first pistols delivered were to Samuel Walker's own company, C Company and then were delivered in alphabetic order: A Company, B Company, D Company, E Company. It is imperative to note that the Company markings were separate from the actual serial number, so each revolver was both serial numbered and unit numbered. Having filled the 1000 unit order for the military, a Civilian series of Walkers was put into production with serial numbers 1001-1100 for two purposes: The first and most notable was presentation arms which would become a famous tactic used by Colt throughout his illustrious career. Presentations would be made to ranking military personages who could secure the all important military contracts. Second was to offer pistols to the commercial or civilian market in order to get this new, innovative and potent revolver in consumer hands and a conversation started. More information to follow on the 100 unit Civilian run to follow, though all this information is absolutely essential in order to properly analyze the Civilian Walker serial number 1078 known better as the Thumb Print Walker. This revolver has been inspected by a handful of known firearms experts over a half century which include the late George Repair (owner and donor of the Sultan of Turkey Dragoon, whom at one time owned this revolver), Greg Martin and the well known author R.L. Wilson, yet never properly analyzed. A ground breaking discovery was made on this revolver by firearms specialists of RIAC. Upon examination RIAC discovered the faintest hint of a "E" stamped just above the wedge on the left barrel flat where the government purchased revolver were unit marked (see photo of "B Company 8" previously sold by RIA). A "B" inspection was then found between the barrel address and the forcing cone, again a proper inspection for the Military contract Walker Revolvers. This has never been mentioned in any other descriptions or articles written on this firearm over a half-century. After diving deeper into a forensic study of this revolver RIAC discovered that the bore had been drilled at a slight angle. This can be most obviously observed when taking the revolver apart and examining the face of the forcing cone (see photo: the bore is drilled slightly to the left, the effect if not corrected would be shaving bullets or cylinder combustion). This can also be observed from the exterior of this revolver when observing the left side of the barrel in two places: first at the forcing cone and second at the barrel joint, (see photo insert) both of which were factory polished smooth. Further, to align the barrel and cylinder a small wedge was factory milled, installed and serial numbered on the bottom of the barrel assembly which corrects the offset of the misaligned drilled bore. To substantiate this claim are the three key factors. 1) The previously discussed and original hint of the "Company E" marking as illustrated in the catalog. 2) The "B" sub inspector mark stamped on the top of the barrel flat between the address and forcing cone. 3) The serial number on the cylinder: 553 correctly stamped on the rear face of the cylinder. We know the sequence in which the companies received the revolvers and using that math would place this cylinder as "B Company 113". Also intriguing is the large "C" stamped on the face of the cylinder. While it is speculation it is not far fetched to believe this gun was condemned for military service as it had its obvious flaws. Given the evidence, it is more than likely fact. It is constantly said that Colt, or any of the major manufactures "never threw anything away". So what conclusions can we make: It is clear that Civilian Walker 1078 is no doubt a factory Civilian Walker made from condemned Military parts. One can only ask the question, did Colt actually produce 100 Civilian Walkers? Perhaps Civilian Walkers are much rarer than they are already perceived to be! However we are not finished just yet. This revolver is fitted with an original factory loading lever correctly assembly numbered, as is the wedge "16". Could this be the first Colt pistol with the new and improved loading lever and catch? Given the analysis, it is certainly plausible. Also intriguing is the silver plating found under the grip. As previously mentioned it was thought that the Civilian guns were given as presentation and it would make perfect sense to have this more deluxe "presentation" feature with a full silver plated grip. One thing is certain: Colt worked on this Walker more than any other, more specifically the work was probably done by the hand of the brilliant son of one of America's most famous inventors Eli Whitney Jr. He of course had a vested interest in these revolvers success and modification of this kind required skill. Over the years speculation on the authenticity of this gun has popped up from time to time because of the left side barrel flat, frame and the distinct thumbprint on the frame. However, as Paul Harvey used to say, "And here is the rest of the story". After these discoveries were made, Rock Island Auction Company felt obligated to seek a second expert opinion. Mr. Herb Glass Jr. was contacted, made aware of the discovery and asked to draw his own conclusion on Civilian Walker 1078. Now accompanying this revolver is a letter by Mr. Glass in which he draws a independent but consensus opinion. Further Mr. Glass states: The fact that parts for civilian guns had apparently become scare by the time this gun was assembled leads to the question of whether or not there actually were 100 Civilian guns made. Additionally this gun is of interest because it is certainly one of the first, if not the first to have the improved lever latch factory installed. This Walker, serial number 1078 along with its fabulous period holster, was first discovered in Mexico in 1958 by Tom P. Weston (see photograph). The markings are extraordinary, sharp and perfect, with numbers matching throughout. The barrel address is sharp and clear "ADDRESS, SAML COLT NEW YORK CITY". On the right side of the barrel lug "US/1847". A sub-inspector mark is also visible, the only such marking on revolver. The cylinder cartouche is distinctly stamped "1078" and the cylinder itself is correctly in the white. The cylinder roll scene is sharp, with the easily visible cartouche markings: "Model U.S.M.R." and "Colt's Patent." Also still legible is the marking of the engraver of the dies, Samuel Colt's friend and colleague: "W.L. Ormsby, Sc. N.Y." The slightly indented impression from the roll die at the rear section of the scene is pronounced. Accompanied by a pine box which was with the revolver when it was originally discovered as well as the finest known example of a Walker holster. Serial number 1078 can be found in the following publications and periodicals: R.L. Wilson, American Arms Collectors Percussion Colts and Their Rivals The Al Cali Collection, pages 4-8. R.L. Wilson, The Paterson Colt Book, pages 286 through 290. R.L. Wilson (ed.), Antique Arms Annual, 1971, published by Texas Gun Collectors Association, page 22 illustrates No. 1078 in color. Provenance: Tom P. Weston, Mexico City William M. Locke L. Allan Caperton Hary Von Erchelber Chris Anderson George Repaire Al Cali Collection of a GentlemanManufacturer: ColtModel: WalkerBBL: 9 inch part octagonStock: Gauge: 44Finish: blue/casehardenedGrips: varnished walnutSerial Number: 1078

  • USAUSA
  • 2014-05-04
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Extremely Rare, Original, Factory Documented 16 Inch Colt "Buntline

Estimate: $325000 - 475000 Rock Island Auction Company is proud, pleased, and honored to present the collecting community with the most famous, the most renowned, and among the most sought-after of all variations of the Colt Single Action Army. This is an extremely rare, totally original example of a Colt Single Action Army Revolver with 16-inch barrel, special front and rear sights and attachable factory stock; popularly known as the "Buntline Special". This revolver is complete with two Colt factory letters dated 1969 and 1970. The factory letters describe the revolver as .45 caliber with 16-inch barrel and blue finish. The letters further state that this is one of five revolvers shipped to B. Kittredge & Co., in Cincinnati, Ohio, on March 30, 1880. One of the letters is addressed to the well known antique firearms dealer Herb Glass of Bullville, New York. The revolver is also accompanied by extensive documentation including a 1956 dated letter to Herb Glass from John S. Du Mont. In that letter Du Mont states that he examined this revolver and the Colt factory records and believes it to be "genuine in every respect". A type-written note attached to the Du Monte letter signed by "Rev. Henry Lee Jones" (who apparently sold Colt No. 28826 to Herb Glass) states that No. 28,826 was purchased by H.J. Payne in "the late 1890s" in front of a saloon "on Front St.,.in Catlettsburg, Kentucky", from "a Logger who had come down the Big Sandy river". Experts believe that the accepted serial number range for carbine-length-barreled Single Action revolvers is 28,800-28,830 (A STUDY OF THE COLT SINGLE ACTION REVOLVER, Graham, Kopec and Moore, page 25). Also present with the revolver is a 28 page R.L. Wilson letter in which he writes "Serial No. 28826 is an excellent example of one of the most difficult and rare of all Legends of the American West firearms to acquire." In the letter Mr. Wilson also states this revolver serial number 28,826 to be "one of the finest known". Included with this revolver is "The AMERICAN RIFLEMAN" January 1976 issue, which pictures this particular Buntline along side lot 228 (also in this sale) on the front cover; both Colt revolvers are formerly of the Thomas Burnham Collection. Eighteen revolvers in this serial number range are recorded in Colt's factory records and 10 of these revolvers have 16-inch barrels. This particular revolver is probably the best documented of the "Buntline Specials". The revolver has a blue barrel, ejector housing, cylinder, trigger guard and back strap. The frame, hammer and loading gate are color casehardened. The one-piece walnut grip has a high polish varnish finish. The attachable stock is bronze with a nickel-plated finish and blued attachment knob. In addition to the 16-inch barrel, the revolver has a special extended hammer screw that serves as a lug for the shoulder stock, a flat top strap with milled groove that is fitted with a unique, folding, long range rear sight and dovetail mounted front sight with nickel silver blade. The ejector rod has the early "bullseye" head. The hammer has extended, bordered, knurling on the spur and a cone-shaped firing pin. The top of the barrel is roll-stamped with the "Condensed Block" address "COLT'S PT.F.A.MFG. Co. HARTFORD, CT.U.S.A.". The left side of the frame is roll-stamped with the Colt "two-date/two-line" patent markings. "45 CAL" is stamped on the left shoulder of the trigger guard. An "H" inspection mark is stamped in the hammer well above the firing pin hole and "20" is stamped in both the rear sight recess and on the face of the ladder rear sight. The full serial number, "28826" is stamped on the bottom of the frame, trigger guard and back strap. The partial serial number, "8826" is stamped on the underside of the barrel beneath the ejector housing. All of the visible serial numbers match. The assembly number "29" is stamped on the inside of the loading gate. BBL: 16 inch round Stock: Gauge: 45 Long Colt Finish: blue/casehardened Grips: walnut Serial Number: 28826 Condition: Fine overall. As noted in the letter from John S. DuMont to Herb Glass; the revolver is all original. The barrel has a smooth gray-brown patina; the original commercial blue finish is visible beneath the ejector housing and around the rear sight dovetail. The barrel legend and serial number are crisp. There are traces of very fine flash pitting on the edges of the muzzle. The trigger guard and back strap have the same patina as the barrel with small amounts of blue finish in protected areas. The cylinder has a darker patina with some fine flash pitting on the face and sides. The frame, loading gate and hammer have a smooth silver-gray patina and retain significant amounts of case colors in protected areas particularly in the rear sight groove. The rear sight is complete with the sighting bar. The serial numbers, patent markings and caliber designation on the frame, trigger guard and back strap are crisp. The walnut grip is very fine and retains nearly 90% of the piano-finish varnish; wear is limited to finish loss on the grip heels and some minor handing marks on the sides and butt. The attachable stock is excellent and retains nearly all of the nickel-plated finish and most of the blue on the attachment knob. The action is crisp and functions perfectly. The Colt "Buntline Special" Single Action revolver is the most desirable and difficult to obtain of all the Colt Single Action variations. This outstanding revolver is well documented as having been owned and examined by some of the foremost Colt Single Action Army experts and collectors. This is the ultimate Colt Single Action Army revolver and quite possibly 19th Century American revolver! More Information

  • USAUSA
  • 2012-09-09
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Winchester - 1873

Documented Special Order John Ulrich Signed, Relief Engraved, and Monogrammed Winchester Deluxe First Model 1873 Lever Action Rifle with Factory Letter This special order, factory engraved Winchester Model 1873 lever action rifle was manufactured in 1876. This rifle has the first model receiver with grooved dust cover guides and dust cover with checkered oval finger grip. The early style loading lever latch has visible threads. The barrel has a rare dovetail mounted Freund front sight with Freund marked base and special Freund folding leaf rear sight with 1,000 yard leaf marked "1876" and Freund markings on the sight base. The rifle has a special order half magazine, single set trigger and checkered steel shotgun buttplate. The top barrel flat is roll-stamped "WINCHESTER'S-REPEATING ARMS. NEW HAVEN.CT./KING'S-IMPROVEMENT-PATENTED-MARCH 29. 1866. OCTOBER. 16. 1860." in two lines ahead of the rear sight. The serial number, "23660", is engraved on the lower tang behind the lever latch. The barrel is correctly not marked with a caliber designation. The bottom of the cartridge elevator is covered with engraving, and the upper tang is fully covered with engraved scrollwork and flowing ribbon. The barrel, trigger and loading gate are blued, and the hammer and lever are color casehardened. The magazine tip, forearm cap, receiver, dust cover, cartridge elevator and shotgun buttplate are silver plated. The stock and forearm are deluxe, fancy grade, high figured walnut with a high polish piano finish. The stock wrist and forearm are checkered. The forearm cap, receiver, dust cover, cartridge elevator and buttplate heel are profusely relief engraved with six panel scenes surrounded by dense scrollwork on a punch dot and lined background. A round panel on the right front of the receiver is relief engraved with a crest, a ribbon with a motto, a monogram and the date "NOV.1. 1876". The lower tang is signed "J.ULRICH" in tiny letters. The rifle is accompanied by a factory letter that describes it as: "Type: Rifle, Barrel Type: Octagon, Barrel Length: 26 inches, Trigger: Set, Engraved and gold and Shot gun stock. The rifle retains most of the silver under-layment. The letter states this rifle was shipped from Winchester on November 14, 1876. The engraving on this rifle is illustrated and described on page 149 of "Winchester Engraving" by R.L. Wilson. Wilson's description states that this rifle was made for Julius B. Sheldon who was active in manufacturing in the New Haven, Connecticut, area. Manufacturer: Winchester Model: 1873 BBL: 26 inch octagon Stock: checkered walnut Gauge: 44 WCF Finish: silver plated/blue Grips: Serial Number: 23360 Class: Antique Condition: Exceptionally fine. The barrel retains nearly 90% of the original blue finish with sharp factory legend. Most of the fire blue finish is present on the loading gate and trigger. The forearm cap, magazine tip, receiver, dust cover and cartridge elevator have 90% or more of the silver plated finish underlayment with traces of gold visible on the tang and interior. The shotgun buttplate has about 80% of the silver plated finish. The hammer and lever show strong case colors. The highly detailed game scenes, monogram and dense scrollwork are extremely sharp. The highly figured walnut stock and forearm retain 90% or more of the high polish piano finish with light-moderate handling wear. The checkered panels are sharp. This is a superb example of of the extraordinary level of craftsmanship available on 19th century Winchester rifles.

  • USAUSA
  • 2016-12-03
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POSSIBLY CONRAD ULRICH'S GREATEST MASTERPIECE AND A LEGENDARY WINCHESTER

SN 79994. Cal.44 Henry. 24" octagon bbl with gold plated with blue finish on other metal parts. Uncheckered wood deluxe highly figured walnut stock. This is a extraordinary exhibition Winchester model 1866 lever action rifle manufactured in 1870 and superbly engraved (signed under lever) by the master of the Winchester engraving shop Conrad F. Ulrich. This rifle is shown on the dust jacket and front piece of the 1975 edition of The Book of Winchester Engraving by R.L Wilson. Pages 103-106 of this book contain a full description and eight illustrations of this magnificent work of art rifle, including a multi-page color foldout. The description states that this rifle is considered to be one of Conrad Ulrich's masterpieces. This most artistic and extraordinary 1866 was the pride of iconic Connecticut collector Jonathan M. Peck and illustrated on pages 30 and 31 of the Texas Arms Manual. The rifle has a very rare blued and engraved octagonal barrel, full-length magazine and lever with a nitre blue loading gate. The hammer and trigger are color case hardened. The brass forearm, nose cap, frame and crescent buttplate have a gold washed finish. The stock and forearm are select fancy grained walnut with high polish piano finish. The barrel is fitted with a globe front sight and the standard model 1866 folding leaf rear sight with 1,000 yard center notch and elevation bar retaining screw at the top of the leaf. A folding leaf peep sight is mounted on the tang. The forearm cap and stock have factory sling swivels. The top of the barrel is roll stamped with the two-line legend "WINCHESTER'S-REPEATING ARMS. NEW HAVEN. CT.-KING'S-IMPROVEMENT-PATENTED-MARCH 29.1866, OCTOBER 16.1860." in an oval panel with engraved borders ahead of the rear sight. The serial number "79994" is located behind the trigger in an engraved panel. The lower tang is stamped "C.F. ULRICH" in a tiny rectangle, with "L.C."as an overstrike. The rifle frame is profusely relief-engraved. The focus of the engraving are two standing nude female figures in relief panel on either side of the frame and three highly detailed game scenes. R.L. Wilson notes that the engraving on this rifle differs dramatically from the typical Winchester scroll and game scene engraving. He states that nude figures are rarely found on engraved arms from the Victorian era. The archways which frame the nudes and the use of geometric borders are of the greatest rarity. The nudes are based on the most famous sculpture of the mid-19th century, "The Greek Slave" by famed sculptor Hiram powers completed in 1844. This magnificent work of art held symbolic meaning for American abolitionists and inspired innumerable poems and essays. Ulrich's use of Power's sculpture to decorate this rifle raises it to the level of high art far above almost any other decorated firearms. The game scene on the left side of the frame depicts five running deer in the forest and in a panel with escalloped borders. The scene captures the fluid lines of animals in motion against a finely detailed forest backdrop of trees and ferns. The right side of the receiver features two game scenes. The first scene depicts a buck, doe and fawn at rest near a forest stream in a circle with escalloped borders. A second smaller scene behind the first depicts a seated hound in a circle with escalloped borders. Six horizontal geometric designs frame the loading gate and six vertical geometric designs separate Ulrich's version of Power's "Greek Slave" from the game scene on the left side of the frame. Smaller geometric ovals form part of the border at the front of the receiver and back of the forearm cap. The underside of the tang and the top of the buttplate heel are also engraved with relief scrollwork. The barrel is decorated with flowing scrollwork on a punch dot background. The engraving extends from the receiver along the top and sides of the barrel for six inches, on the sides of the barrel for several inches near the forearm cap and on the top and sides of the barrel for about 4" behind the muzzle. Conrad Friedrich Ulrich began his engraving career with Colt and served his engraving apprenticeship primarily under the renowned Gustave Young. Serial 79994 is regarded as the finest and best known of all engraved 1866 Winchester rifles. The combination of a relatively early production Model 1866 rifle, special order features, distinctive and flawlessly executed engraving by one of the 19th Century American master engravers. Dramatic bright fire gilt finish and outstanding condition make this rifle one of the finest of all engraved Winchesters. PROVENANCE: Jonathan M. Peck 1971: Arlen L. McCroskie 1975; The spectacular collections of Ray Bentley featuring the finest and rarest deluxe antique Winchesters in the world. CONDITION: Extremely fine. The rifle is in outstanding original condition and retains 98% of the original blue and gold washed finish. The barrel and magazine retain nearly all of the high polish blue finish. The engraving and barrel legend are extremely crisp. The loading gate has more than 95% of the fiery nitre blue finish intact. Nearly all of the gold washed finish remains on the forearm cap, frame and buttplate with very minor handling wear on high points. The highly detailed engraving on the frame, forearm cap and buttplate is deep and extremely sharp. The highly figured fancy deluxe figured walnut stock and forearm are both excellent; nearly all of the oiled piano finish is present, with few extremely minor handling and storage marks. The hammer and trigger retain nearly all of the muted case colors. Action is excellent. Bore bright and shiny. This magnificent Conrad Ulrich Engraved Model 1866 rifle is the ultimate engraved Model 1866 Winchester rifle, and the finest we have ever offered. It is a collection in itself and one of the most famous of all Winchesters. As a work of 19th Century art it transcends the fact it is a firearms and its interpretation of Power's "Greek Slave" sculpture makes it worthy of display alongside one of Hiram Powers' sculptures or the finest American 19th Century paintings. The fortunate purchaser of this splendid rifle will own an 'American Winchester Legend'. 53091-88

  • USAUSA
  • 2018-03-22
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1907 $20 Saint Gaudens High Relief PF-69 NGC

1907 $20 Saint Gaudens High Relief PF-69 NGC Augustus Saint-Gaudens, designer; Henry Hering modeler; modified by Charles Barber Obverse: Liberty striding forward, wearing flowing gown, and hair blowing in the wind; her left foot on a rock, beside which is an oak branch; she holds a lighted torch in her right hand, and an olive branch in her left. To her lower right, a small representation of the Capitol building, behind which 23 rays of the sun emanate, around, 46 stars; above, LIBERTY; at lower right, M•C•M•VII. Around, broad border. Reverse: Eagle flying left, across rays of the sun; above, •UNITED•STATES•OF•AMERICA• / •TWENTY•DOLLARS• in two lines. Edge: E✴PLURIBUS✴UNUM✴✴✴✴✴✴✴✴✴✴✴ in Roman Face letters from triple-segment collar. Condition: NGC Proof 69 Wire Rim (Certificate number: 1963253-016 – Photo Proof 10-07; previous Photo Proof 10-05 [number 163434-001]). Wire rim. Warm, softly satiny fields, with the Mint-made swirls of raised die polish lines that are a hallmark. The small shadow at the rim at 5.30 on the obverse is not a flaw, but a raised, mint-caused bulge of metal. Under 10 power magnification three or four mint-made specks can be seen above the leading edge of the eagle's front wing and help to identify this exceptional coin (these can also be seen on the Browning collection example). Simply spectacular, and as the grade suggests the coin is mint-fresh, and essentially unimprovable. References: This Coin Published: Garrett & Guth (Encyclopedia) p. 511, 573; Bowers (A Guide Book of Double Eagles) p. 233; A Guide Book to United States Coins (The Red Book), 60th – 65 eds., 2007 - 2012; A Guide Book to United States Coins (The Red Book) 66th ed., 2013, pp. 278, 425; this coin cited on the NGC Coin Explorer website in Jeff Garrett's Description and Analysis: "The finest High Relief graded by NGC is a PR 69 that sold for $534,000 in 2005." Other references: Breen (Proofs) p. 209; Breen (Encyclopedia) 7358; Akers (1982) pp. 282-285. (PCGS 9136) Condition Census: Tied for finest known, or the finest (although until recently one other coin appeared in the NGC census), none finer; PCGS (which does not acknowledge the Proof term for Saint-Gaudens high relief issues) has graded a single Mint State 69 example and none finer. (07-13) Rarity: While scarce as a type, the high relief Saint-Gaudens double eagles are probably the most popular coins in the entire gold series. The combined number graded at both NGC and PCGS (which, naturally, includes a fair number of re-submissions) exceeds 8,500 pieces, or approximately two-thirds of the total produced. However, the air gets much thinner when one realizes that only two examples (or approximately two-one-hundredths of one percent) have been graded as perfectly preserved as the present lot. Jeff Garrett on the NGC website notes this example as the finest graded by NGC (however, the 2005 Photo Proof cites one other at this grade, and the 2007 Photo Proof adds yet another; but as noted above, the current census cites only this single coin). A remarkably rare coin, especially when one takes into consideration that of the approximately 1.8 million Saint-Gaudens double eagles (proof and business strike) graded by the big-two firms, only about a dozen 69s have been graded; and this, as one of the most admired and desired designs in the entire US coin series is in a class apart. Since the Morse Collection sale in 2005,no examples of comparable grade have appeared at auction (apart from reappearances of the MS 69 Morse coin). Provenance: The Philip H. Morse Collection of Saint Gaudens Coinage, Heritage, November 3, 2005, lot 6529, Flat Rim PR 69 NGC (Certificate number: 163434-001), "Possible Finest known 1907 Specimen Striking .... essentially perfect..." ($534,750) ) [Note: Although catalogued in the Morse sale as a flat rim, it is a wire rim specimen. The old NGC insert did not specify the type, and the holder in which it was then housed may have obscured the true type of rim.]; probably [as noted above, the microscopic specks above the eagle's wing are present] H. Jeff Browning Collection ("The Dallas Bank Collection"), Sotheby's/Stack's, October 29-30, 2001, lot 151, "Wire Rim...Superb Gem Satin Finish Proof. Spectacular." ($115,000); most of the Browning Double Eagles were acquired privately (via a group of dealers including Mike Brownlee) as a single purchase of the R.E. ("Ted") Naftzger Collection in the early 1970s. Naftzger assembled much of his collection in the 1940s and 1950s via Abe Kosoff, and it is entirely possible that this amazing superb gem comes from this source. Note: The history of the Saint-Gaudens gold coin designs has been published in various forms for years, and in the last decade or so more information than ever has been made public. President Theodore Roosevelt intensely disliked the look of the 19th century coin designs and pressured a dying Augustus Saint-Gaudens to take the commission in 1905. The intent was to develop coins struck in high relief to emulate the coins of ancient Greece. Saint-Gaudens, mortally ill, designed the coins and left the modeling to his assistant Henry Hering. Throughout the Mint's Chief Engraver Charles Barber fought the President and his chosen artist every step of the way. But in the end a handful of patterns with exceptionally high relief were struck. Although they delighted the President they were useless for commercial use. Following Saint-Gaudens' death in August 1907 the President ordered an extensive run of examples with slightly reduced relief be struck for general circulation; both to show what could be achieved and probably to honor the dead artist. With approximately 12,000 produced, examples of the 'regular' high relief double eagle are probably the most popular of all collectible American coin designs, and is widely acclaimed as America's most beautiful. The archival record regarding the production of Proofs of this design is scant. However, according to Breen, Charles Barber confirmed their production, and approximately seven examples were contained in his estate. While the pedigrees of these have become hopelessly muddled over the years, the extraordinary quality of this example may point to it having been one of those saved by Barber.

  • USAUSA
  • 2013-09-24
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Colt 1860 Army Revolver Matching Deluxe Shoulder Stock

Iconic, Well Documented and Phenomenal Cased Factory Vine Scroll Exhibition Engraved Colt Model 1860 Army Revolver with Matching Deluxe Shoulder Stock Considered by many to be one of the finest 1860 Army's manufactured by Colt, No. 183226 remains an absolute icon in the pantheon of fine 19th century American arms, certainly the finest 1860 Army with matching deluxe shoulder stock. It was subsequently part of the famous William M. Locke collection and is pictured and described in "THE WILLIAM M. LOCKE COLLECTION" by Frank Sellers. It was later part of the esteemed Warren Anderson Collection and was purchased by Mr. Lee in March of 1993 at the first sale of the Warren Anderson Collection. This icon of its field is proudly photographed, written and discussed in many of the premiere works of literature on fine Colt's including: "Magnificent Colts the Collection of Robert M. Lee" pg. 258, "The Book of Colt Engraving" pg. 158, "Colt Engraving" pg. 185, "The Colt Heritage" pg 104 all by Wilson. It is also featured in the "The William Locke Collection" pg. 32 and the "1971 Antique Arms Annual, by the Texas Gun Collectors Association" pg. 150. The revolver and the attachable shoulder stock feature the rarely encountered Colt "Heavy Leaf" scroll engraving, identified by Wilson as the finest example of this rarely observed engravers art. This engraving style was used for a approximately one year c. 1870 and is attributed by Colt engraving expert R.L. Wilson to Conrad F. Ulrich. The engraving covers the top and sides of the barrel lug, the frame, hammer, bottom of the trigger guard bow sides of the trigger guard and back strap. A lightly cut, finely engraved line encircles both ends of the cylinder scene. The shoulder stock yoke, upper and lower tang and buttplate are also engraved with the heavy leaf scrollwork. A block "E" stamped above or below the serial number on the barrel lug, frame, trigger guard, back strap indicates those components were designated by Colt for engraving or special finish. The barrel, cylinder and back strap have a high polish blue finish and the loading lever, frame and hammer are color case-hardened. The brass trigger guard, stock yoke and buttplate are silver-plated. The one piece walnut grip and the stock are highly figured, fancy grade, walnut with a high polish piano finish. The stock wrist is checkered. The barrel has a German silver front sight blade and the hammer spur has fine bordered knurling. The top of the barrel is roll-stamped with the legend: "- ADDRESS COL. SAML COLT NEW-YORK U.S. AMERICA-"". The cylinder is roll-engraved with the Texas Navy battle scene, "ENGAGED 16 MAY 1843" and "COLTS PATENT No.". "44 CAL" is stamped on the left shoulder of the trigger guard. The cylinder is not numbered which Wilson notes in Steel Canvas is observed on a number of highly finished deluxe Colt presentation arms during this period of the 1860's and early 1870's. The full serial number, "183226" is stamped on the bottom of the barrel lug, frame, trigger guard, back strap and on the lower stock tang behind the yoke. The partial serial number "226" is stamped on the buttplate heel. All of the visible serial numbers match. The revolver and stock have a French-fitted mahogany case lined with blue felt. The case contains: (1) five packets of American Cartridge Co., combustible envelope cartridges, (2) a 250 count tin of Eley percussion caps with tan paper label, (3) blued, iron, bow-leg bullet mold marked "COLT'S PATENT" on the sprue cutter and "44H" on the right block, (4) L-shaped combination screw-driver/nipple wrench and (5) Hawksley powder flask with adjustable charger. Manufacturer: Colt Model: 1860 Army BBL: 8 Inch Stock: walnut checkered Gauge: 44 percussion Finish: blue/case-hardened Grips: varnished walnut Serial Number: 183226 Class: Antique Condition: Exceptionally fine. The barrel exhibits 85% of the original high polish blue finish showing flaking on the bottom and lower edges of the barrel lug. The cylinder retains 95% of the original blue finish and nearly all of the Texas Navy scene. All of the cylinder safety pins are intact on the rear face of the cylinder. The back strap retains 30% of the original blue finish, mostly in protected areas; the balance has aged to a smooth, silver-gray patina. 98% of the vivid original beautiful case colors are present on the loading lever, frame and hammer. The silver plating on the edges of the trigger guard and stock buttplate show some limited wear but at least 95% of the original silver-plated finish on the trigger guard, stock yoke and buttplate remains. There is some flaking visible in some light dings on the left side of the yoke. The upper corners of the grip have some finish loss and scratches from contact with the stock yoke but the grip remains in very fine condition and retains more than 85% of the original piano finish. The fancy grade presentation quality walnut stock is in excellent condition with crisp checkering. At least 95% of the piano finish remains intact. The case exterior is in good overall condition with scattered storage marks and one hair-line crack that extends from the right edge of the case to the shield-shaped brass escutcheon. The case interior is in very good condition. The lining has faded slightly and has a few scattered oil stains and compression marks. All of the cartridge packets are sealed and remain in very good condition. The cap tin is in good condition and nearly all of the paper label remains intact. The powder flask remains in very fine condition and retains 98% of the brown lacquer finish on the body and gold-plated finish on the top and charger. The combination screw-driver/nipple wrench has 90% of the fire blue finish intact. This is an extremely rare Model 1860 Army revolver. The combination of matching shoulder stock with select wood and checkering, and rarely encountered "Heavy Leaf" engraving and distinctive case make this a truly one of a kind set. This is one of the best Colt Model 1860 Army shoulder stock revolvers extant and has been part of some of the finest collections of Colt revolvers ever assembled. Provenance: William M. Locke Collection, Warren Anderson Collection and Robert M. Lee Collection.

  • USAUSA
  • 2017-09-10
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1964 AC COBRA 289 MKII

1964 AC COBRA 289 MKII Premier numéro de châssis export Châssis n° COX 6001 Moteur Ford V8 avant 4 727 cm3 Carburateur quadruple corps Puissance 275 ch à 5 800 tr/min À la fin des années 1950, le Texan Carroll Shelby (à ses heures éleveur de poulets) s'était fait remarquer en Amérique comme en Europe par ses talents de pilote au volant de Ferrari et surtout, en remportant les 24 Heures du Mans 1959 sur Aston Martin. Son patriotisme lui faisait regretter l'absence d'une véritable voiture de sport américaine capable de battre les GT de compétition européennes. Il allait donc la fabriquer dans l'esprit " dragster " local en montant - vieille recette de base - un gros moteur dans un châssis plus rigoureusement conçu afin de produire une voiture performante, homologable pour la route et pour la compétition, mais sans recourir à une mécanique exotique. En quête d'un châssis rigide, léger et doté d'un comportement dynamique de haut niveau qu'il équiperait d'un moteur américain peu coûteux, mais puissant, efficace et fiable, il choisit le châssis britannique AC à quatre roues indépendantes et le nouveau bloc V8 Ford de la Fairlane relativement peu encombrant. Le projet se concrétisa au moment où le motoriste Bristol allait arrêter la fabrication du six-cylindres deux litres (issu du moteur BMW 328) aux limites de son développement qui équipait les AC Ace et Aceca. L'usine AC accepta volontiers de fournir à Shelby des ensembles châssis-carrosserie que les Américains équiperaient chez eux du moteur Ford préparé et d'une solide boîte Borg-Warner manuelle à quatre rapports synchronisés. Malgré la cylindrée " limitée " à 4,2 litres, la Cobra 260, la première de la famille, dépassa aisément 240 km/h et accéléra de 0 à 100 km/h en moins de 6 secondes (selon les rapports de transmission). L'excellence des performances encouragea aussitôt la course à l'armement et Shelby monta le nouveau bloc Ford 4,7 litres dès qu'il fut disponible, malgré une tenue de route à la limite en raison du rapport poids-puissance-couple déjà très favorable et d'un châssis très sollicité en torsion sous l'effet du couple énorme pour lequel il n'avait pas été calculé à l'origine. Mais il fallut conserver les ressorts à lames transversaux et améliorer la précision de la direction en adoptant une crémaillère. Sous cette forme, la Mk II (ainsi désignée a posteriori) séduisit les amateurs de sensations fortes (plus de 300 ch à la tonne !) et fit carrière dans les compétitions américaines. Elle courut aussi en Europe où, confiée à des pilotes au gros cœur (voir Jo Schlesser au Tour de Corse 1963), elle essaya de tenir tête aux meilleures GT sur les routes du Vieux Monde malgré un châssis désormais dépassé. La Mk II fut la Cobra la plus produite avec plus de 500 exemplaires fabriqués de 1963 à 1968 et surtout la plus utilisable sur route avant l'apparition de la monstrueuse " 7 litres ", la redoutable 427 dont le châssis, les suspensions, les freins, les roues et les pneus et la caisse avaient été retouchés, sinon profondément modifiés en fonction du couple énorme et des 400, voire 480 ch du moteur Ford (qui équipa aussi les célèbres GT40 Mk II et Mk IV). Quoi qu'il en soit, les Cobra 289 et 427 sont devenues des voitures mythiques que leur rareté rend encore plus désirables au point de susciter depuis bientôt quarante ans l'apparition d'innombrables copies ou d'imitations plus ou moins proches du type original, qui reste la référence absolue en la matière. Quelle auto efficace que cette Cobra livrée neuve en France à Chardonnet et exposée au Salon de Paris la même année. Il s'agit du premier numéro de châssis export. Son premier propriétaire est M. Leman. 15 ans après, elle est restaurée en Angleterre par Brian Angliss, avant de devenir la propriété de Bernard Afchain. Celui-ci la vend à M. Leiguel qui en profite quelque années et revient dans les mains de M. Afchain. Il la confie en décembre 1992 à l'Etude Poulain-Le Fur qui la vend au propriétaire actuel. Le mécanicien Franck Opderbeck l'adapte au sans plomb, change les étriers, les pneus, les trois joints spi de pont et la fait rouler de manière très régulière. Il s'agit d'une voiture très saine, dotée de performances impressionnantes, dont l'intérieur en cuir beige est d'origine, présentant une superbe patine et un parfum authentique. Une voiture rare dans cette configuration originale, une force de la nature parfaite pour tous rallyes. Carte grise française first chassis export number Ford 4727cc V8 front-engine (275bhp at 5800rpm) In the late 1950s a Texan chicken-breeder called Carroll Shelby made his mark on either side of the Atlantic - due to his talent as a driver at the wheel of a Ferrari and, above all, by winning the 1959 Le Mans 24 Hours in an Aston Martin. But he felt patriotic regret at the absence of a veritable American sports car able to beat European racing GTs. So, in local 'dragster' spirit, he made one himself, adopting the age-old recipe of mounting a large engine in a more rigorously designed chassis to produce a high-performance car that could be certified for both road-use and competition, without having recourse to sophisticated mechanics. After searching for a light, rigid, dynamic-performance chassis to equip with an inexpensive yet powerful, efficient and reliable American engine, Shelby chose a British AC chassis and Fairlane's new, relatively unwieldy Ford V8 engine. The project took shape just when Bristol were about to stop making this six-cylinder, 2-litre engine (derived from the BMW 328) used for the AC Ace and Aceca. The AC factory readily accepted to supply Shelby with chassis-bodywork ensembles to be fitted in the USA with the Ford engine and a solid Borg-Warner manual four-speed gearbox. Despite a capacity of 'just' 4.2 litres, the Cobra 260 - the first in the series - easily topped 150mph, with 0-60mph acceleration in under 6 seconds. These excellent performances swiftly encouraged an 'arms race', with Shelby mounting the new Ford 4.7-litre engine as soon as it was available - despite its erratic road-holding due to an already favourable weight-power-torque ratio, and a chassis that bore the strain of a tremendous torque for which it had not been originally designed; a steering rack was installed to improve precision. It was in this form that the Mark II (as it was later known) thrilled drivers and spectators (over 300bhp per tonne!) during its racing career Stateside. It also competed in Europe, with big-hearted drivers (like Jo Schlesser in the 1963 Tour de Corse) attempting to match the best GTs on the road, despite its already outdated chassis. The Mark II was the most extensively produced of the Cobras, with more than 500 cars made from 1963-68. It was above all the most road-friendly, prior to the monstrous '7-litre' - the redoubtable 427 whose chassis, suspension, brakes, wheels and tires had been modified, if not profoundly altered, to take into account the enormous torque and the 400bhp (sometimes even 480bhp) produced by the Ford engine (which also equipped the celebrated GT40 Mark II and Mark IV). Be that as it may, the Cobra 289 and Cobra 427 became mythical cars, all the more desirable because of their rarity. Over the last forty years they have prompted countless more-or-less successful copies or imitations of the original, which remains the supreme reference. This superbly efficient Cobra, with the first chassis export number, was delivered new to Chardonnet in France, and shown at the Paris Motor Show the same year. Its first owner was Mr Leman. It was subsequently with Mr Afchain, who had it fully restored in his workshops. It must have had another owner in the meantime. Mr Afchain consigned it for auction with Poulain-Le Fur in December 1992, when it was bought by its current owner. The mechanic Franck Opderbeck has adapted it for unleaded petrol and changed the tires, calliper and the axle's three oil seals, and had it driven regularly. This car has posted some impressive performances and is in excellent condition, with its original beige leather interior with superb patina and authentic aroma. It is rare to find a car in this original configuration - a force of nature perfect for any rally. French registration "carte grise" Estimation 340 000 - 380 000 € Sold for 423,222 €

  • FRAFrance
  • 2010-07-09
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Magnificent The Very First "1 of 1000" Winchester 1876 Lever Action

Magnificent The Very First "1 of 1000" Winchester 1876 Lever Action Rifle, With Deluxe Gold Trim What an unbelievable offering, probably the most desirable, all original, factory documented "1 of 1000", 1876 lever action rifle in 45-75 cal. Only a total of "54" model "1 of 1000" 1876 rifles were ever made and this rifle, serial number "710", is the lowest serialized "1 of 1000" 1876 rifle and the serial number is noted in Midas' "1 of 1000" book on Winchesters on page 245. Under the picture of another "1 of 1000" rifle he states that "the serial numbers of the model 1876s in this special gun, run from serial number '710' and upward." Obviously indicating the "1 of 1000" started with this exact rifle. This series of rifle was a continuation of the super scarce Winchester model "1 of 1000" 1873 rifles but instead used the new larger action with the new improved high power calibers. This "1 of 1000" series of rifles in both the 1873 and 1876 rifles were intended as marketing ploy by Winchester to sell "Special Select" rifles with hand selected barrels (which showed better accuracy) they were fitted to rifles that had extra special hand fitted metal parts with deluxe hand selected extra walnut stock and forend with light engraving. Being the very first "1 of 1000" 1876 called for some deluxe features and this rifle certainly has them. It has the standard 28 inch full octagon barrel with the full magazine with both ends of the barrel have the correct and original amount of factory scroll engraving on the visible flats with both ends having a single silver barrel bands and obviously it is correctly marked "1 of 1000" on the top barrel flat in front of the receiver. It has a pistol grip stock with the deluxe 3X or 4X grade of feathered crotch walnut on the stock and forend, and both are checkered, with stock having crescent/rifle buttplate. The factory letter states with "GOLD" trim, and in looking at the rifle that equates to gold plated magazine tube retaining rings, hammer, loading lever, buttplate and receiver! Yes, that's correct the receiver and buttplate have a gold washed finish over the color case hardening, it has flaked off because it didn't stick very well but it is still visible around the edges with a slight gold tint on the flats. It is also fitted with factory sling swivels, set trigger and a factory mounted long range tang sight and gold wash combination Beech front sight. The factory letter, dated March 1999, states that this rifle was shipped from the warehouse on Nov. 15, 1877, with seven other model 76's on Order #10379, with all features confirmed by the factory letter. Being such an early production rifle, it has all the desirable first model features such as the open top receiver with no provisions for a dust cover, the early plain style model markings of just "MODEL 1876" on the tang, the original bushed firing pin with the serial number located on the very end of the lower tang and correctly marked just above and around the tang screw, with the trapdoor buttplate which houses an original four piece cleaning rod.

  • USAUSA
  • 2008-09-08
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Documented Extremely Rare Exhibition Panel Scene Factory Engraved

Documented Extremely Rare Exhibition Panel Scene Factory Engraved German Silver Frame Winchester Model 1866 Lever Action Rifle with Factory Letter Connected to Exhibition Shooter Chevalier Ira Paine Manufactured in 1870, this extraordinary Winchester Model 1866 lever action rifle features the only solid German silver frame and is decorated with a highly detailed factory exhibition quality deep relief engraving with panel scenes. Although the rifle is not signed externally, the engraving was probably executed by Master Engraver Conrad Ulrich and represents some of his most elaborate work. Model 1866s with similar engraved patterns attributed to Conrad Ulrich are found in R.L. Wilson's book "The Book of Winchester Engraving." See, for example, pages 97, 98 and 99. The scrollwork and panel scenes are of are of extremely high grade factory work from the period. The solid German silver frame sides are adorned with a profusion of deep relief scrollwork with stylish borders. The scrollwork extends to the frame tangs and top and underside surfaces. Scrollwork surrounds an engraved dog on the left rear side of the frame while a fine panel scene of a hunter with his dog is engraved on the left side of the frame ahead of the side plate. The right side of the frame features a leopard engraved at the rear and two additional panel scenes. The first scene depicts a hunter taking aim at a stag in a dense forest. The second scene depicts a dog chasing a rabbit in an open field. The panel scenes are cut with a light touch, associated with Conrad Ulrich. The scrollwork extends to the forend cap, cartridge elevator and barrel. Note that wedges of scrollwork are featured on the barrel at the muzzle, mid-point and breech. At the muzzle the scrollwork extends to seven barrel flats with the addition of an engraved band. An eagle's head is engraved on the upper tang. The serial number on the lower tang is inside a scroll banner. The top barrel flat is marked "WINCHESTER'S-REPEATING ARMS. NEW HAVEN. CT./KING'S-IMPROVEMENT-PATENTED-MARCH 29. 1866. OCTOBER 16. 1860" and is flanked by scrollwork. The barrel is fitted with a blade front sight (missing bead) and a notch rear sight. The rifle has a solid German silver frame, cartridge elevator and forend cap, niter blue loading gate and casehardened hammer with the remaining metal surfaces silver plated. Mounted with a factory highly figured varnished walnut straight grip stock (3x) with fine checkering on the forearm and wrist and fitted with a shotgun buttplate. The accompanying factory letter confirms the rifle configuration, octagon barrel, 3x varnished stock, engraving and silver plating. The factory records note that this rifle was a "special gun transferred from back book" (likely referencing that the rifle was maintained by the factory for a period of years and used as an exhibition piece) and later shipped on May 6, 1878. Note that only 24 Model 1866s actually letter. The provenance of this rifle is discussed in an included March 4, 1974 dated letter written by Belmont L. Worman to Winchester Arms and a 2016 notarized letter from Belmont Worman II, Belmont L. Worman's son. According to Belmont L. Worman, his grandfather, William P. Loper, received this rifle as a gift from famed exhibition shooter Chevalier Ira Paine while working as the general manager of Frank A. Robbins' Circus during the 1880s. Before establishing his own circus, Frank Robbins worked as a concessionaire, or candy butcher as it was called in those days, hawking sweets and learning the showman trade at various circuses, including P.T. Barnum, in the 1870s. Around 1881 Robbins started his own circus, which operated until he retired in the fall of 1915. But retirement did not sit well with Robbins, and in 1916 he entered the carnival business where he became the first showman to use motor trucks for transportation, which up until that time had been exclusively done by train. Robbins died tragically in October 1920 from injuries incurred after a 20 foot fall through a skylight. The lives of Robbins, Loper and Paine crossed paths in the 1880s. Loper and Paine are listed in the Frank A. Robbins' Circus route books, published daily records of the circus, that date for the 1886 and 1887 seasons. Loper is listed as the general manager and Paine is listed as an exhibition shooter. (Paine's wife, Anna, was his assistant.) Known as "King of the Pistol" and "Master Shot of the World," Chevalier Ira Paine was born in 1841 in Providence, RI. After high school he joined a successful quartet, which gained him a considerable reputation. As good as he was on stage, he was an even better exhibition shooter. He may have been the world's finest all around shot during his 25 years as a shooting entertainer. Some of his most chronicled feats involved his public challenges with Captain Adam Bogartus, the legendary late 19th Century shotgun shooter. Although Paine lost most of the live pigeon shoots, it was never by more than two birds and whenever the two faced off the prize money was usually $1,000, a fortune at the time. With a dueling pistol he could regularly cut his business card in half from 30 feet when put on its edge. He also used rifles and shotguns with the same accuracy and dexterity. By America's 1876 Centennial he became so popular that he took his show to Europe where he entertained kings, czars, prime ministers and other famous people. The glass ball target was originally invented by Paine and were used as substitutes for the live pigeons during most of his shooting exhibitions, circa 1876 to 1886. Paine stuffed many of the glass targets with feathers and when squarely hit would blow feathers in a three foot diameter, which crowds never seemed to get enough of. Paine died in 1889 at the age of 48 in Paris, France, while on tour. Loper went on to be elected the Mayor of Frenchtown, New Jersey. Included with the rifle is a grouping of Frank Robbins' Circus memorabilia. The grouping consists of the following: four separate watercolor paintings on lined paper depicting the Frank Robbins' Circus train accident that left four flat cars "wrecked" on May 22, 1890 (each illustration measures approximately 6" x 9 1/2"), blank Frank Robbins' Circus employee contract, Frank Robbins' Circus route book for the 1887 season, a photocopy of Frank Robbins' Circus route book for the 1886 season and a legal document between Loper and Robbins. Manufacturer: Winchester Model: 1866 BBL: 24 inch octagon Stock: walnut Gauge: 44 RF Finish: nickel/silver Grips: Serial Number: 36200 Class: Antique Condition: Excellent. The barrel, magazine and lever retain 90% original nickel plated finish showing high edge wear and some minor flaking. The buttplate has a smooth dark patina overall. The loading gate retains 40% original niter blue finish. The hammer retains flashes of original case colors, otherwise a smooth dark patina. The frame and forend cap are solid German silver and have a nice patina. The wood is excellent showing some minor pressure dents and scratches with overall crisp checkering. Mechanically fine. A true high conditioned, factory documented engraved Model 1866 lever action rifle that is the envy of any antique Winchester collector!

  • USAUSA
  • 2016-09-11
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Cased Samuel Colt Presentation Colt Model 1862 Police Revolver

Extraordinary and Historic Cased Deluxe Factory Engraved and Inscribed Samuel Colt Presentation Colt Model 1862 Police Percussion Revolver Presented to Major Charles T. Baker This historic Model 1862 Police revolver was manufactured in 1861 (the first year of production) and presented by Colt founder Samuel Colt to Major Charles Traintor Baker (1821?1881). It is known that Colt revolvers were specially inscribed and presented by Samuel Colt to government officials, military leaders, business associates and personal friends. It is important to note Samuel Colt died on January 10 of 1862, making this gun certainly one of his last presentation revolvers, if not his last. This is not the first gun Colt presented to Major Baker. In fact, Colt presented Baker with a cased Model 1860 (serial number 7569), and this revolver resides at New York?s famed Metropolitan Museum of Art (MET). The Model 1860 is pictured and described in the MET?s "Notable Acquisitions, 1983-1984" on page 25 and R.L. Wilson?s ?Samuel Colt Presents? on page 174 and featured on the MET?s online catalog. The MET?s Model 1860 was also manufactured in 1861, meaning that both revolvers were presented to Major Baker at the dawning of the Civil War. According to the MET?s records, Baker served as an officer in the 5th Regiment of Connecticut Volunteers at the time of the presentation. Although the writer was unable to find Baker?s name among the official Civil War record of men serving this regiment, it is interesting to note that the record does indicate a ?one Colonel Baker from Windham County appearing as a military instructor of regiment.? Baker lived in Windham County where his home can still be viewed today and was an infantry tactics instructor at West Point. The rank of colonel could possibly be in error. Baker graduated from West Point on July 1, 1842. Upon graduation he was promoted to brevet 2nd lieutenant with the 3rd Infantry, served in the Second Seminole War in 1842, was in garrison at Ft. Stansbury, Florida, in 1842-1843 and Jefferson Barracks, Missouri, in 1843-1844, was on frontier duty at Ft. Jesup, Louisiana, in 1844 and Ft. Towson, Indian Frontier, in 1844-1845 and was an assistant instructor of infantry tactics at West Point from 1845 to 1851. He retired in December 1851, possibly with the rank of 1st lieutenant. His father, Colonel Rufus Baker (1790-1868), served in the U.S. Ordnance Corps and was elected president of Sharps Rifle Manufacturing Company in 1856. Samuel Colt was a master salesman above all his other attributes, and he found that the best kind of advertising that he could employ to promote his products were the products themselves. He handed out finely engraved and inscribed presentation guns to anyone he thought to be a worthy recipient. One of his guns placed in the hands of an influential person, believed Colt, would go a long way in winning support and acceptance of his products. Major Baker, an officer linked to a regiment organized in Colt?s hometown of Hartford, made a perfect candidate for one of Colt?s special presentation revolvers. The presentation of this revolver was also during a period when Colt was attempting to create a regiment fully armed with his products. This military unit became known as the 1st Regiment Colt?s Revolving Rifles of Connecticut but quickly disbanded before ever engaging in combat. Many disbanded soldiers from the Colt?s Regiment re-enlisted in the 5th Regiment of Connecticut Volunteers. The 5th Regiment of Connecticut Volunteers was organized in July 1861 at Hartford, participated in several engagements including Battle of Front Royal, First Battle of Winchester, Second Battle of Bull Run, Battle of Gettysburg, Atlanta Campaign and Battle of Bentonville and was mustered out of service July 1865. The factory presentation inscription to Major Baker is featured on the back strap: ?Major Charles T. Baker/From Col. Colt.? (Note that the MET?s Model 1860 has an identical back strap inscription.) Most of the remaining surfaces of the revolver exhibit a beautifully executed foliate scroll engraving on a punch dot background which incorporates a wolf head on the left side of the barrel lug, the rear of the cylinder at each chamber and both sides of the hammer. The hammer spur is hand knurled and has a seven dot inverted "V" motif beneath the knurling. This style of engraving is indicative of revolvers from Gustave Young and his shop. The top of the barrel is stamped with the one-line New York address, the left side of the frame is engraved ?COLT?S/PATENT,? and a cylinder flute is stamped with the patent date. The barrel and cylinder have the Colt extra high polish commercial blue finish reserved for special presentation pieces. It is truly an impressively rich finish that speaks volumes to the quality of Colt craftsmanship in the mid to late 19th century. The loading lever, frame and hammer are color casehardened, and the brass trigger guard and back strap are silver plated. The oiled one piece grip is highly figured walnut. Matching serial numbers are stamped on the frame, barrel, trigger guard, back strap, arbor pin and cylinder. The barrel wedge is un-numbered. The serial numbers on the barrel, frame, trigger guard and back strap are accompanied by a dot that indicates special attention by the factory. The factory partitioned case is lined in royal purple velvet and contains an Eley Brothers cap tin, ?L? shaped wrench/screwdriver, extra hammer spring, extra hand, two extra percussion nipples, ?COLTS/PATENT? marked two cavity bullet mold, package of Police combustible envelope cartridges (opened), and single face eagle Colt?s patent powder flask. Also take note that the MET's cased Model 1860 also has similar spare parts. Samuel Colt presentation revolvers are the rarest and most historic Colt percussion firearms. Manufacturer: Colt Model: 1862 Police BBL: 6 1/2 inch round Stock: Gauge: 36 percussion Finish: blue/casehardened/silver Grips: highly figured walnut Serial Number: 3420 Class: Antique Condition: Excellent. The barrel and cylinder retain 95% bright original high polish blue finish with the balance thinning to a gray. The hammer, frame and loading lever retain 85% original case colors. The grip straps retain 97% plus original silver plating. The grip is also excellent showing a few minor handling marks. Mechanically excellent. The case is fine showing minor-moderate handling/storage marks, a detached short partition wall and typical high spot wear on the lining. A high conditioned Samuel Colt presentation factory engraved deluxe Model 1862 Police revolver presented to an identified Civil War Union officer that will do well in even the most advanced Colt or Civil War collections. For the highly advanced high end Colt collector who wants to buy the best the first time around and not have to upgrade later!

  • USAUSA
  • 2017-12-02
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COLT SINGLE ACTION ARMY SN 5773 POSITIVELY PROVEN TO HAVE BEEN USED

Please Note (4/7/2017): We misspelled John Kopec's name in the description. It is spelled Kopec NOT Kopek. SN 5773. Cal. 45 Colt. Usual configuration with 7-1/2" bbl, full front sight and 1-line script letter address with serifs at each end. Left side of frame has 2-line September 19, 1871 and July 2, 1872 patent dates along with a small "U.S." Mounted with 1-pc walnut grip with matching SN in the backstrap channel. Ejector housing is orig first type with bullseye ejector rod head and base pin is orig type with dimpled ends. Bottom of the bbl under the ejector housing is marked with matching SN which is also found on the cylinder. Bottom of the bbl also has a tiny "A" (Orville W Ainsworth) sub-inspector initial along with a small "P". Mr. Ainsworth's "A" inspector initial is also found on the trigger guard below the SN and on the cylinder which also has a tiny "P" inspector initial. Top of the backstrap also has a small "A" sub-inspector initial. The grip shows heavy wear which has obliterated the Ainsworth cartouche and bottom edge of grip is somewhat battered which also obliterated his inspector initial. Front bottom edge of the ejector housing is beveled rather than having a sharp edge as it originally left the factory. Bottom front edge of the buttstrap is also lightly beveled instead of being a sharp edge as was original on these early revolvers. This was often done at the arsenal level and in the field. The reason being that sharp edges on the ejector housing quickly wore the holsters and the sharp edge of the buttstrap was uncomfortable for the shooter. Cylinder has large, wide stop notches without approaches but shows slight battering from the lock bolt in those areas. Loading gate has the assembly number "710" which is also found on bottom of frame, under the trigger guard. A large portion of the revolver has moderate to heavy blood pitting, especially on the cylinder, recoil shield and frame. This Colt SA Army is a true historic American treasure. It is the only documented, complete and original Colt SA Army that can be proven to have been part of one of the greatest military cavalry disasters of all time. In the summer of 1876, General George Armstrong Custer together with 12 companies of approximately 800 men were on the trail of Sitting Bull and his band of Sioux followers. Custer's command was part of a 3 prong effort to source, capture and bring back this large group that had left the reservation. Custer and his men discovered Sitting Bull's camp on the banks of the Little Big Horn River on the 25th of June and for various reasons decided to immediately attack. Custer divided his command into 4 units; 3 of which would participate in the battle. His intention was to descend upon the Indian village with the 3 different units all attacking in pincer type movement. Custer, with 200+ men, intending to go to the far end of the village while Reno and Benteen coordinated and attacked on the other end of the village. When Custer initially planned the attack, he assumed it was a typical Indian village. What he did not know was that it was a massive gathering of Lakota, Sioux, Northern Cheyenne and Arapaho Indians consisting of literally thousands. Reno was the first to attack and was quickly repulsed and retreated to a hilltop defense position which he and his men desperately held. Eventually Benteen returned coming to their rescue and together they were able to repulse the attacks. Custer and his 5 companies, however, were not so fortunate. Upon attacking the far end of the village, he was immediately repulsed and his command, shortly thereafter, disintegrated. Eventually, the Indians overwhelmed Custer's command. Custer, his two brothers, a nephew, his brother-in-law, together with his entire command were annihilated; not a single soul survived. A couple of days later, Benteen together with a command of troopers, visited the battle site and collected and buried all of their massacred brothers. What they observed was a grisly battlefield of naked, mutilated bodies and virtually nothing of value left. The Indians had removed t

  • USAUSA
  • 2017-04-11
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1870 $20 Ultra Cameo PF-67 NGC

1870 $20 Ultra Cameo PF-67 NGC James B. Longacre, Designer Obverse: Head of Liberty facing left, wearing a bejeweled coronet on which LIBERTY is emblazoned; around, thirteen stars; below, 1870. Reverse: Heraldic eagle, head facing left, with spread wings and shield emblazoned on its chest holding olive branch and three arrows in its talons; above, the motto, IN GOD WE TRUST within an oval of thirteen stars amidst rays of Glory; around, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA; below, TWENTY D. Condition: NGC Proof 67 Ultra Cameo (Certificate number: 1963253-014 – Photo Proof 10-07; previous Photo Proof 01-07 [number 1560799-001]). A superb coin with incredible, deeply mirrored fields, rich orange-peel effect and intense and nearly perfect cameo devices. Fresh dies, a faint pair of mint-caused specks that flank the lowest point of the ninth star serve to identify this example, as does a tiny inclusion through the arrowheads. The apparent planchet flake at 10 o'clock on the reverse, breaks in the frost on some of the reverse lettering, and the 'dimple' on Liberty's cheek are characteristics apparently shared by all specimens. References: This Coin Published: Breen (Proofs) p. 140, 5; Akers (1982) p. 93; Garrett & Guth (Encyclopedia) p. 498; this coin used to illustrate the date on the NGC Coin Explorer website. Other references: Breen (Encyclopedia) 7234; Bowers (Guide Book of Double Eagles) p. 130, (PCGS 99085). Condition Census: The finest known, NGC lists no other examples this perfectly preserved; PCGS lists none this fine (Proof 65 cameo the finest). In fact, an examination of the combined population reports of both services reveals that this coin is tied with only one other as the finest known specimen of the entire design type. A splendid coin with a fantastic pedigree. (07-13) Rarity: Exceptionally rare, thirty-five proofs are recorded as having been made. Breen (Proofs) was only able to trace the whereabouts of eight examples, more accurately seven, as he noted two coins that were probably identical; he later refined this figure to 10 to 12; Akers (1982) estimated that "no more than 10 proofs still exist" (a figure which falls midway in Bowers assessment [A Guidebook of Double Eagle Gold Coins]); Garrett and Guth, in their Encyclopedia note an example in the American Numismatic Society (ex J.P. Morgan and Brock Collections), two in the Smithsonian (neither of which is nearly as fine as this example), and estimate less than ten examples in private hands (with the population reports swollen by re-submissions). However, the recent 2011 auction of probably the second finest known example (NGC Ultra Cameo Proof 65 CAC), noted that only 4 to 5 examples were confirmed in private hands and cited (as number 1 in their census) the presently offered example as the finest known. Following its most recent (2007) auction appearance, the presently offered coin, according to the Red Book (2009 ed.), ranked among the 250 most valuable U.S. coins ever sold, and among the ten most valuable 19th century double eagles ever sold [including examples of the 1861 Paquet, 1854-O, 1856-O and 1870-CC]. Provenance: The Orlando Sale, January 2, 2007, lot 1410, Proof-66 PCGS, "Magnificent ... stunning ... superlative condition" ($368,000); Ed Trompeter Collection; Louis E. Eliasberg Collection ("The United States Gold Coin Collection"), Bowers and Ruddy, October 27-29, 1982, lot 924, Proof-65 ($28,600); "Believed to be from the John H. Clapp Collection, 1942 [via Stack's]. Earlier from the Richard Collection (New York Coin and Stamp Co., June 1899.)" Note: In 1866 the double eagle saw its first change in design since being issued in 1850 with the addition of the motto, IN GOD WE TRUST to the reverse in the ellipse of stars above the eagle's head. Eleven years later the design was changed once again, but during this post-Civil War period demand for proof gold was minimal. Mint records indicate that a paltry 335 proof double eagles were struck of the entire design type (fewer even than the initial eight years of proof coinage of the No Motto variety).

  • USAUSA
  • 2013-09-24
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EXCEPTIONAL & EXTRAORDINARY CASED FLUTED COLT MODEL 1860 ARMY PERCUSSION

EXCEPTIONAL & EXTRAORDINARY CASED FLUTED COLT MODEL 1860 ARMY PERCUSSION REVOLVER WITH MATCHING SHOULDER STOCK. SN 893. Cal. 44. In our opinion, this is the single finest fluted Army Colt Model 1860 in the world. This revolver has 7-1/2" rnd bbl, German silver front sight, 1-line Hartford address, 6-shot full fluted cylinder with serial number in one flute, a 4-screw frame with flat head hammer screw & extended stock screws. Left side of frame has "COLT'S PATENT" in tiny letters. It also has a brass trigger guard & iron back strap with 1-pc oil finish walnut grip. Accompanied by its orig walnut casing with brass corner reinforcements & a blank scalloped rectangular plate in lid. Interior is red velvet lined & compartmented in bottom for revolver, matching numbered oil finished walnut stock with brass yoke & buttplate, a sgl sided, angle spout "COLT'S PATENT" Army sized flask & a 44 caliber iron 2-cavity "COLT'S PATENT" mold with sprue cutter marked "44H" on right side. Left rear compartment contains a sealed tin of Eley's caps & four orig packets of combustible cartridges, all of which are open, two are empty & two remain full. Model 1860 fluted Army revolvers are rare with an estimated total production of only about 4,000 revolvers, a large number of which were shipped to southern distributors just prior to outbreak of the Civil War and thus are considered secondary Confederate arms. These very rare revolvers alone are seldom encountered and almost never with high condition. Matching numbered shoulder stocks are nearly unheard of and a complete cased set is the ultimate in rarity for the Model 1860. This very gun is pictured on p.170 of "Col. Sam Colt Presents" and is suited for the ultimate, most discerning high level Collector or Museum. PROVENANCE: Wadsworth Athenium Coll.,Colt Factory Coll., CT State Lib. Coll., Warren Anderson Collection; Butterfield & Butterfield Lot 4044, March 1992. CONDITION: Revolver is exceptionally fine and virtually as new, all numbered parts are matching with bbl & cylinder retaining 99%+ glossy deep orig factory blue with one small scratch & a couple of small dings on bbl. Cylinder has dried oil in flutes and retains all six crisp safety pins. Rammer & handle retain virtually all of their brilliant case colors as does frame & hammer. Trigger guard has extremely crisp edges with a medium mustard patina. Back strap & butt strap retain virtually all of their glossy orig factory blue with only very faint heel wear from case. Grip is equally new with a few minor nicks & scratches with some slight bruising from stock iron and retains about all of its orig oil finish. Mechanics are crisp, brilliant shiny bore. Case has a small grain check at left rear corner and pry marks around lock with broken lock trunions and the shield shaped escutcheon is missing, otherwise case is sound with minor handling & storage nicks & scratches and retains most of its orig factory varnish. Interior is lightly faded in bottom showing wear from cylinder, front sight & hammer spur. Flask is virtually new retaining about 99% orig finish. Matching numbered stock is also new retaining a fine medium mustard patina on yoke & buttplate with beautiful fire blue on screws, sling stud, ring & lug with wood retaining all of its orig oil finish. Mold is also new & unused. Cap tin paper covering shows wear with some crackling & minor losses but is basically intact. As previously noted two of cartridge packets are open & empty with other two open but remain full. Altogether the single most extraordinary complete set, and believed to be the finest condition set in the world today. 4-35783 (350,000-450,000)

  • USAUSA
  • 2008-10-07
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* Superb Engraved and Gold Inlaid Winchester Model

* Superb Engraved and Gold Inlaid Winchester Model 1886 Takedown Rifle in Unfired Condition Made for John F. Dodge, .33 WCF caliber, 24" matted top round barrel, take-down, serial number 151483. "F"-style checkered pistol grip, shotgun buttstock and forearm are of hand-made oil-finished English walnut. The left side of the stock has a "Roosevelt"-style cheek piece outlined by three tiered scrolls. Checkering is very fine, thirty-two lines to the inch. Rifle has a checkered trigger. The left side of the receiver is engraved and inlaid in gold with images of a buck, doe and fawn. The right side is engraved and inlaid in gold with a bull moose and cow. The underside of the receiver, forward of the lever carries a raised gold monogram composed of the letters J.F.D. ca 1.25" in length. Balance of the receiver, lever, barrel at breech, muzzle, forearm tip, top of breech bolt, upper and lower tang, buttplate, screw heads, magazine plug, takedown lever are all highly engraved. Rear sporting sight with untouched "Sheard" medium gold bead front sight. The Winchester Factory letter specifies: One hundred ninety-five grams of gold, $125.00 for engraving by (J. Ulrich), $25.00 for checkering by (C. Ulrich). There has been research done on vintage factory engraved Winchester rifles with $100.00 or more of engraving. Cowan's Auction researcher found only nine such rifles in the Winchester firearms records. Of the nine, two had more than $100.00 worth of engraving on them. This rifle is one of these two listed in the Winchester factory records. All of this information regarding the work in making the Model 1886 rifle #151483 is detailed in the factory letter from the Cody Museum. This firearm was made exclusively for John F. Dodge, co-founder of the Dodge Automobile Company. The rifle is truly a work of art and a "one of a kind" Winchester Model 1886 rifle. Seldom does a collector find a Winchester factory letter that has details listing all of the unique features of creating a special ordered rifle so thoroughly documented. Furthermore, it is unusual to find a Winchester rifle that has been engraved by one Ulrich and checkering rendered by another Ulrich and properly documented.

  • USAUSA
  • 2009-04-29
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Rare Documented, Winchester 1873 "One of One Thousand" 1st Model

Extremely Rare Documented, Winchester First Model 1873 "One of One Thousand" Lever Action Rifle with Factory Letter This is an exceptional example of a Winchester One of One Thousand Model 1873 Rifle with extensive documentation. Winchester manufactured 136 One of One Thousand Model 1873 rifles between 1875 and 1879. A letter of evaluation of this rifle by Winchester expert R.L. Wilson states that only about 30 of these rifles had been located by collectors and historians. In 1950 as part of the promotion for the movie "WINCHESTER 73", the Winchester Repeating Arms Company attempted to identify the surviving One of One Thousand rifles. This rifle is complete with a copy of a letter dated January 28, 1953, from Winchester to Norman L. Patten of Detroit, Michigan, notifying Mr. Patten that: "rifle No. 18070 is one of the very rare "One of One Thousand Model 73's". The rifle is accompanied by a letter from the Winchester Gun Museum dated 1971 and a letter from the Buffalo Bill Historical Center dated 1977 that describe the rifle's features and verify that it is listed in Winchester factory ledgers as a "1 of 1000" rifle. The Buffalo Bill letter states: "The original Winchester Records housed in our Museum, describe Model 1873, Serial Number 18070 as a rifle, 1/2 octagon barrel, set trigger, 4X checkered stock, Pacific Buckhorn sights, casehardened, 1 of 1000, swiveled, engraved. It was received in the warehouse on February 26, 1876, and shipped February 28, 1876". This rifle is also listed in the Winchester warehouse ledger reproduced on pages 375 and 376 of "Winchester's New Model of 1873", Vol. 2 by James D. Gordon. This rifle has what Gordon identifies as "Fourth Style" markings and engraving on page 390 of his book. "One of One Thousand" is engraved in script letters on the top barrel flat of the 24-inch half-round/half-octagon barrel reading toward the receiver. The "One of One Thousand" marking is bordered by dot and scallop engraving with an engraved flourish next to the rear sight. The sides of the barrel are engraved with deeply cut scrollwork on a punch-dot background. Silver bands are inlaid at the barrel breech and muzzle. The muzzle has four engraved scrolls on a punch-dot background. The barrel has a gold-plated Beach folding combination globe and post front sight and a early style, 2 1/2-inch, Sporting Rear Sight with knurled edges and five step elevator. The R.L. Wilson letter states that half-round/half-octagon barrels and short magazines are very rare on Model 1873 One of One Thousand rifles. The rifle has the first style receiver with grooved dust cover guides and dust cover with checkered oval finger grip. The receiver has a single set-trigger. A folding graduated peep sight is mounted on the upper receiver tang. The hammer has bordered knurling on the spur. Factory eyelets for sling swivels are mounted on the forearm cap and stock. The Wilson letter notes that sling swivels are rare on One of One Thousand rifles. The crescent buttplate has a sliding brass trapdoor. The butt trap contains a four-piece, jointed steel sling swivel with brass tip. The stock and forearm are deluxe, highly figured, 4X, fancy grain walnut with early style Winchester checkered panels and a piano finish. Wilson's letter states that the "XXXX" marking is stamped on the left side of the lower tang and visible when the stock is removed. The top barrel flat is roll-stamped with the two-line legend: "WINCHESTER'S-REPEATING ARMS. NEW HAVEN. CT./KING'S-IMPROVEMENT-PATENTED-MARCH 29. 1866. OCTOBER 16. 1860" ahead of the rear sight. The serial number is stamped in script numerals on the lower tang behind the lever latch. The forearm cap, receiver, dust cover, hammer, lever and crescent buttplate are color casehardened. The loading gate has a niter blue finish. The barrel, magazine, rear sight, tang sight and trigger are Winchester blue. The sock and forearm have a semi-matt piano finish. The Model 1873 One of One Thousand rifle is the best known of all Winchester rifles. One of One Thousand rifles are considered by experts to be the ultimate rarities in Winchester collecting. In addition to the Wilson Winchester Museum and Cody Museum letters, this rifle is accompanied by a list of all of the owners from 1950-1977. The most prominent collectors to own this spectacular rifle were John R. Woods and subsequently Robert M. Lee. The rifle was listed by serial number in the Oct. 1950 issue of American Rifleman (?The End of a Search? by Bill Depperman, page 38) as being purchased by E. Ames Alden of Boston in 1880. A photocopy of this article is included. Also included is a photocopy of a letter written by Alden?s son, Charles, circa 1950, which further explains that this rifle ?was used for several years during vacations to the Adriondacks and many deer were killed with it.? The gun was left to Charles after his father passed away in 1887. Manufacturer: Winchester Model: 1873 BBL: 24 inch part octagon Stock: highly figured 4X walnut checkered Gauge: 44-40 WCF Finish: blue/casehardened Grips: Serial Number: 18070 Class: Antique Condition: Extremely fine overall. This rifle is all original and retains 80% plus of the blue finish. The engraving and markings are extremely sharp. The stock and forearm are in very fine-excellent condition and retain nearly all of the original piano finish with sharp checkering. The R.L Wilson letter describes this rifle as: "among the finest examples of a One of One Thousand Model 1873 in existence". His letter states that this rifle has handsome case colors and concludes: "This is a rifle fitting for the finest museum or private collection". This is a splendid example of a Model 1873 One of One Thousand rifle with impeccable documentation that has been part of some of the finest collections of American firearms. Provenance: The Robert M. Lee Collection.

  • USAUSA
  • 2017-12-02
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Médailles, armes & armures

Si vous êtes intéressé par les médailles et les décorations militaires, cette catégorie de vente aux enchères est faite pour vous. Vous y trouverez des armes historiques et modernes tels que des fusils, des couteaux et des pistolets, ainsi que des armures anciennes, des épées, des armes d'apparat ou des fusils à silex.