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An American Revolutionary War Battleflag, 1776–1779

An American Revolutionary War Battleflag, 1776–1779, An American Revolutionary War Battleflag, 1776 - 1779 The color of the 2nd Continental Light Dragoons captured by Lieutenant Colonel Banastre Tarleton at Pound Ridge, Westchester County, New York on July 2, 1779. Together with the three further battleflags in the next lot, the last American Revolutionary War colors known to remain in British hands and the last such colors to remain in private hands anywhere. The  earliest surviving American flag of any kind with  a field of thirteen red and white stripes. One of the last great relics of the Revolution in private hands. The silk standard with a field of thirteen red and white stripes centered by a painted badge of a winged and fulminating thundercloud with ribbon-enclosed motto, the whole bordered on three sides with a wide silver metallic fringe. Stripes of red and white silk, pierced together with overlapping seams, compose the flag’s field. A further strip of red silk is joined to the hoist end of the flag where it forms a border through which four eyelets have been pieced through which cords would have secured the flag to its wooden lance. Small sections of the cord remain. Centering the flag and pierced into the field is a rectangle of painted fabric which displays within a gold and black border on a red ground a circular black thundercloud sustained on a pair of silver wings and from which dart ten gold and orange thunderbolts. Below the thundercloud and contained within a golden scrolling ribbon is the motto, painted in black, “PAT:A CONCITA  FULM:NT NATI.” The silver fringe, continuous on three sides, is bound to the flag with silk thread. Dimensions: Including fringe 35 1/8 inches (hoist) x 38 ¾ inches (fly) Excluding fringe 30 inches (hoist) x 36 inches (fly) Framed Design of the Battleflag: The earliest Revolutionary War flags were modifications of British flags. The stripes of the Union Jack were simplified into thirteen red and white stripes signifying the union of the thirteen states. On June 14, 1777, the Continental Congress passed a resolution for the creation of a national flag. “Resolved that the flag of the United States be thirteen stripes alternate red and white, that the Union be 13 stars white in a blue field representing a new constellation.” Perhaps the present flag predated this Congressional resolve; perhaps it drew its design from our national standard. The union of thirteen stripes appeared in the cantons of a number of Revolutionary War colors; however, as no examples of our national flag survive from the Revolutionary War period, this flag is the earliest surviving (and only Revolutionary era) American flag of any kind to use in its design a field of thirteen red and white stripes. The badge painted in the center of the flag has an ancient history. The winged thunder cloud raining thunderbolts evokes the terrible power of Zeus, the king of gods, and, as a device, appears on Ancient Greek coins, circa 500 B.C. The device was later adapted by the Romans, appearing on Roman Imperial coinage. The device was adapted for use by eighteenth-century French cavalry, which may have been the way in which it was transmitted to an American cavalry standard. The Latin motto below the badge can be roughly translated, “When their country calls, her sons answer in tones of thunder.” Dating the Flag : The Second Regiment, Continental Light Dragoons was authorized on December 12, 1776. Thus the flag could date as early as 1776, but no later than its capture on July 2, 1778. Further work needs to be done on the chronology of this flag with respect to the two other surviving Revolutionary colors of this regiment. These two, one at the Smithsonian Institution, the other at the Connecticut State Library, are more rudimentary in their design. The thirteen stripes have been relegated to a painted canton and the exploding thundercloud devices are painted with less detail and fewer highlights. The embellishment of the fine silver fringe is omitted from both these flags which are also slightly smaller than the flag captured by Tarleton. They could well be later flags, commissioned to replace the lost color of 1779, but, given the austerity of the times, completed with fewer flourishes.

  • USAUSA
  • 2006-06-14
Prix ​​d'adjudication
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Three American Revolutionary War Battleflags, 1778–1780

Three American Revolutionary War Battleflags, 1778–1780, Three American Revolutionary War Battleflags, 1778–1780 The complete stand of three colors of the 3rd Virginia Detachment, under the command of Colonel Abraham Buford, captured by Lieutenant Colonel Banastre Tarleton at the Battle of Waxhaws, Waxhaws, South Carolina, on May 29, 1780. Together with the battleflag in the previous lot, the last American Revolutionary War colors known to remain in British hands and the last such colors to remain in private hands anywhere. This regimental flag and its matching grand division colors form the only intact stand of regimental colors known to have survived from the Revolution. The earliest surviving documented American flag of any kind bearing thirteen stars. The earliest surviving documented American flag designed, as is our national flag, with a canton of stars. The earliest surviving documented American flag containing, as does our national flag, five-pointed stars. Among the last great relics of the Revolution in private hands. THE REGIMENTAL COLOR. The silk gold-yellow field well-painted on both sides with the device of a beaver felling a palmetto over the motto “PERSEVERANDO” and inset on the upper hoist and with a blue silk canton containing thirteen silver five-pointed stars. The flag is composed of three equal widths of yellow silk seamed together, to the upper hoist end of which has been pieced a canton of blue silk into which have been inserted thirteen silver tin-glazed five-pointed stars, arranged as a triangle of three stars within a circle of eight stars, with two further stars at the upper left and right corners of the canton. Whether the beaver and palmetto were centered between its hoist and fly end of the color is uncertain as a portion of its fly end has been cut away and is missing. If the images were centered then as much as 17 inches of its fly end is missing. If it were not (as is the case with other colors where a canton was part of the design) then the missing portion would be as little as five or six inches. Dimensions: 50 ¼ inches (hoist) x 45 3/8 inches (fly) Framed THE YELLOW "GRAND DIVISION" COLOR. The gold-yellow field composed of three strips of silk sewn together and on the hoist folded back to create a pole sleeve. The color is centered on both sides with a painted scrolling white ribbon highlighted with green containing the word “Regiment.” Self-fringed on the fly end. Dimensions: Including fringe 44 ½ inches (hoist) x 44 inches (fly) Excluding fringe 44 ½ inches (hoist) x 42 inches (fly) Framed THE BLUE "GRAND DIVISION" COLOR. The sky blue silk field composed of two sections of silk sewn together and folded back on the hoist end to create a pole sleeve. Centering both sides of the color is a painted scrolling white ribbon, highlighted in pink, containing the word “Regiment.” The fly end is self-fringed. Dimensions: Including fringe 40 ¾ inches (hoist) x 43 ¾ inches (fly) Excluding fringe 40 ¾ inches (hoist) x 42 ½ inches (fly) Framed  Design of the main Regimental Flag: The regimental flag in this stand of colors is lushly painted on both sides with the device of a broad-tailed and bear-like beaver gnawing through the trunk of a palmetto tree. A stream flows by and on the grassy verge are broad-leaved water plants. Forming a lower border to this tableau is a scrolling ribbon containing the Latin word “Perseverando.” How this beaver and tree metaphor for the virtue of persistence in overthrowing tyranny reached the designers and flag-makers of this color is clear. When it became necessary for this new nation to create its own paper currency, Benjamin Franklin was invited to select appropriate motifs to be engraved on the new Continental bills. He consulted his 1702 edition of Joachim Camerarius's Symbolorum ac emblematum for suitable motifs. For the six dollar bill he chose an emblem signifying perseverance. The six dollar bill, albeit in the roughest form, included also almost all the elements of the present flag’s device: the beaver, palmetto, riverbank, and motto. This transference of emblems from patriotic currency to patriotic flags is conclusively demonstrated by an important Revolutionary War survival. This is Major Jonathan Gostelowe’s inventory, known as “Gostelowe’s Return,” which described in detail thirteen new stands of regimental colors held in his Continental Army Commissary stores in Philadelphia during the summer of 1778. This regimental color is described along with others for which there are no complete surviving examples. But all the described flags have in common devices drawn from Continental currency. The artist of this flag – who, perhaps, in quieter times, painted tavern signs and carriages – elaborated considerably on the rudimentary six dollar image. The beaver is large and robust. The palmetto flourishes but is doomed. To enclose this motto the artist has added a scrolling ribbon. The Union of Stars: The most remarkable aspect of this flag is the sky blue canton containing thirteen inset tin-glazed five-pointed stars. This is the most extraordinary survival of all. While the “Gostelowe Return” describes all thirteen flags bearing unions of stars, of the three likely survivors of the Return (in addition to the 3rd Virginia Detachment they are the “Headman Color” and the “Fort Washington Color”) only this one still retains the canton of stars. The appropriate arrangement of thirteen stars was a particular challenge for eighteenth-century flag-makers. The arrangement of stars in this flag is especially complex and unique among eighteenth-century flags. A circle of eight stars surrounds a triangle of three stars. In each of the upper corners of this canton are two further stars. The inspiration for this arrangement may well have been the Continental Congress’s resolution of 1777 establishing a national flag. The resolution calls for “13 stars white in a blue field representing a new constellation.” That phrase resonates. As our country was the latest nation among the nations of the Earth, so were the stars of our flag a new constellation among the stars in heaven. Was the designer of this flag creating his own version of a “new constellation”? The arrangement of stars is complex and intriguing. In any event this spatially complex design was difficult for a flag-maker to compose with scissors, thread, and paint and was never used again. There are three other Revolutionary War period flags with a canton of thirteen stars. But they all either postdate this flag or are undocumented. Dating the Colors: In the summer of 1778 Major Jonathan Gostelowe, a Commissary of Military Stores for the Continental Army, drew up an inventory of “New Standards and Divisionary Colors” available in his stores in Philadelphia. The “Gostelowe Return," as it came to be known, lists thirteen regimental standards, one of which is identical to the present flag. However, that flag is described as being accompanied by blue and red division colors, not blue and yellow. It is possible that the present flag was “new” in 1778. Certainly the design dates from no later than 1778. As all three colors were made of matching silk, they all must date from the same point in time.

  • USAUSA
  • 2006-06-14
Prix ​​d'adjudication
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[WATSON, James Dewey]. Nobel Prize Medal in Medicine or Physiology for his work on the discovery of DNA’s structure. 23 carat gold, 66 mm diameter (ap

[WATSON, James Dewey]. Nobel Prize Medal in Medicine or Physiology for his work on the discovery of DNA’s structure. 23 carat gold, 66 mm diameter (approx. 2 5/8 in.). Profile bust of Alfred Nobel facing left on obverse, with “ALFR. NOBEL” at left and his dates in Roman numerals at right, signed along lower left edge (incuse) “E. LINDBERG 1902”, reverse with allegorical vignette showing the figure of Science unveiling Nature, signed at right “E. LINDBERG”, legend “INVENTAS VITAM IUVAT EX COLUISSE PER ARTES” around edge, “J. D. WATSON / MCMLXII” engraved below on plaque, with caption “REG UNIVERSITAS – MED CHIR CAROL” on either side of the plaque; rim marked “GULD 1950” (Kungliga Mynt och Justeringsverket [Swedish Royal Mint]); housed in original red morocco gilt case, interior lined in tan suede and satin. Prior to 1980 the Nobel Prize medal was made from 23 carat gold, but since then Nobel Prize medals are made of 18 carat green gold plated with 24 carat gold. The diameter of the Nobel Prize medal is 66 mm but the weight and thickness varies with the price of gold. The average Nobel Prize medal is 175 g with a thickness ranging from 2.4-5.2 mm. Both sides of most of the categories of Nobel medals are the same, showing the image of Alfred Nobel and the years of his birth and death. However, the verso of the Physiology or Medicine medal is different (as here), depicting the goddess of medicine quenching the thirst of a sick girl. The medals for Physics, Chemistry, Physiology or Medicine and Literature were modeled by the Swedish sculptor and engraver Erik Lindberg (1873-1966). According to his will, the Swedish inventor Alfred Nobel established the prizes in 1895, and the prizes in Physics, Chemistry, Physiology or Medicine, Literature, and Peace were instituted in 1901. (The related Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Sciences was created in 1968.) While the initial five prizes are awarded in Stockholm, the Nobel Peace Prize is presented in Oslo. The Nobel Prize is widely regarded as the most prestigious award available in the fields of literature, medicine, physics, chemistry, peace, and economics. The Nobel Prizes in Physics, Chemistry, and Economic Sciences are awarded by the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences; the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine is awarded by the Nobel Assembly at Karolinska Institutet; the Nobel Prize in Literature is awarded by the Swedish Academy; and the Nobel Peace Prize is awarded by the Norwegian Nobel Committee. Awarded annually, each laureate receives a gold medal, a diploma and a sum of money, which is decided by the Nobel Foundation. In 1962, the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine was awarded jointly to Francis Harry Compton Crick, James Dewey Watson and Maurice Hugh Frederick Wilkins “for their discoveries concerning the molecular structure of nucleic acids and its significance for information transfer in living material.” Maurice Wilkins’s colleague Rosalind Franklin (1920–1958), whose data and research using X-ray diffraction images of DNA were essential to Crick and Watson’s determining its structure and formulating their double-helical model, died of cancer at the age of 37, and was therefore not so honored because the Nobel Prize cannot be shared by more than three scientists, nor can it be awarded posthumously.

  • USAUSA
  • 2014-12-04
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1880 $4 Stella Coiled Hair Cameo PF-67 NGC

1880 $4 Stella Coiled Hair Cameo PF-67 NGC George T. Morgan, designer (attributed) Obverse: Head of Liberty facing left, wearing diadem inscribed LIBERTY, her hair braided and tightly coiled on top of her head; around, ★6★G★.3★S★.7★C★7★G★R★A★M★S★; below, 1880. Reverse: Large five-pointed star inscribed in incuse: ONE / STELLA / — / 400 / CENTS, in five lines; around outer rim: UNITED STATES OF AMERICA — FOUR DOL.; around, within outer legend: E – PLURIBUS – UNUM — DEO – EST – GLORIA. Condition: NGC Proof 67 Cameo (Certificate number: 1963260-004 – Photo Proof 10-07; previous Photo Proof 04-05 [number 1916321-002]: "NGC has certified just one other as PF67 Cameo and none finer"). A rich yellow-red color with exceptional frosting of the devices over deeply mirrored surfaces. A minimal lint mark to the right of the second 7 on the obverse, and a small (mint-caused) line ascending from the upper left point of the star between .7 and C are two hallmarks to identify this specimen. An amazing example which is virtually unimprovable. References: This Coin Published: Breen (Proofs) p. 167 (8); Akers (1976) p. 82; Akers (Patterns) pp. 53, 104; Garrett & Guth (Encyclopedia) p. 170 ("One of the finest pieces known for the issue..."), 570; A Guide Book to United States Coins (The Red Book), 59th ed., 2006, pp. 233, 399; 66th ed., 2013, pp. 252, 423; this piece used to illustrate the type on the NGC Coin Explorer website. Other references: Judd 1660; Pollack 1860; Breen (Encyclopedia) 6411; Garrett & Guth, 100 Greatest U.S. Coins. (PCGS 88060) Condition Census: Tied for finest known. NGC records only two other examples as Proof 67 Cameo, none finer; PCGS records none graded this perfectly preserved (Proof 64+ Cameo and Proof 66 without the cameo designation, the finest). (07-13) Rarity: Exceptionally rare. One of the classic rarities of the entire United States series. Although the precise mintage records are thus far lost, the consensus of researchers is that no more than ten to fifteen were produced, with nearly ten surviving examples (though the Red Book cites only eight) having been confirmed (without duplication of listing); Teichman (U.S. Patterns website) lists nine confirmed examples including the Smithsonian example (the presently offered lot is his number 2). According to the PCGS records of auction appearances this is the finest certified piece ever sold at auction, and according to Guth & Garrett is finer than the Smithsonian coin by three full points. According to the 2006 Red Book, this coin when last sold at auction realized a price within the top-20 all-time U.S. coin prices ever realized up to that time, its price only exceeded by such iconic rarities as the 1933 Double Eagle, 1804 Dollar, 1913 Liberty Head Nickel, Brasher Doubloon, and 1894-S Dime. Provenance: Gold Rush Collection, Heritage, January 12, 2005, lot 30044, PR66 Cameo NGC, "an exceptional cameo proof," (but incorrectly identified in the census as example 2 or 5 [Kern or DuPont]; it is example 3), ($977,500); Stack's Fixed Price List, Summer 1997 as part of a complete set ($875,000); Winner F. Delp Collection, Stack's, November 17, 1972, lot 792 ($35,000). Note: The Coiled Hair design has long been attributed to George T. Morgan, and a close comparison of the two designs clearly defines the hands of two different engravers. Charles Barber, succeeded his father, William as the sixth Chief Engraver of the Mint in 1879. He was, by almost universal agreement, technically gifted but a lackluster artist. Morgan, an Englishman, by comparison, was recommended for the assistant engraver's post precisely because of his artistic gifts, which were amply displayed in his series of pattern half dollars in 1877 and 1878, and of course his well-known silver dollar. Here the coiled hair design is not only treated with greater naturalism than Barber's flowing hair design (even the pupil of Liberty's eye is delineated), but the design itself is more sophisticated. The braided plait on top of Liberty's head is delicately and intricately engraved, and the portrait of Liberty is fully modeled and has a distinct individual personality. By contrast, the flowing hair design presents a more distant, cool effigy of Liberty with her hair more heavily engraved, both aspects of which are more in keeping with Barber's well-established use of classical sculpture for his inspiration. David Akers also noted that there may be an aura of mystery surrounding the issue of 1880 Coiled Hair Stellas. In his extensive examination of examples during his long career, he noticed that the issue came with two distinctly different finishes. The first group (as displayed on this specimen and that in the Smithsonian, for example) has frosted devices and mirrorlike fields; those of the second variety are effectively brilliant proofs with little if any cameo contrast (indeed, Akers states that they appear polished). He suggested that one variety, probably the first group (as the Smithsonian's example bears these features) may be original strikes, and the other re-strikes, but there is no data thus far known which would support such a conjecture. Suffice it to say, as Akers did, "this stella remains the rarest of the four." In fact, the 1880 Coiled Hair Stella has long been thought of as the 'great white whale' of the four coin series, and while the voracious collector Virgil Brand is known to have owned more than one example, it eluded even such great and sophisticated collectors as T. Harrison and John Work Garrett, the Norwebs, and Harry Bass.

  • USAUSA
  • 2013-09-24
Prix ​​d'adjudication
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1967 FERRARI 275 GTB/4 BERLINETTA

1967 FERRARI 275 GTB/4 BERLINETTA 100% restaurée, matching numbers, française d'origine Châssis n° 10427 Moteur n° 10427 Les premières années 1960 confirment chez Ferrari le passage progressif des types destinés à être utilisés en compétition et accessoirement sur la route aux types routiers éventuellement préparés pour la compétition. La base mécanique en est toujours le moteur V12 Colombo de 1947, le célèbre " simple arbre " sans cesse amélioré qui a signé un copieux palmarès tant sur la route que dans les épreuves d'endurance. Le glissement vers des modèles plus " civilisés " s'affirme avec la 250 GT/E, premier coupé 2+2 de 1960, puis avec les 330 America et 330 2+2 de 1963, tandis que la " 250 GT Lusso " avoue plus franchement sa vocation de routière " de luxe " tout en conservant l'empattement des redoutables berlinettes compétition " châssis court ", indice d'un caractère sportif encore vivace, confirmé par ses deux places, un confort relatif et une habitabilité restreinte. C'est à ce modèle hybride et performant, mais d'une rare élégance, complété par la série des 250 GT/L un peu plus confortables, que doit succéder en 1964 la nouvelle berlinette 275 GTB qui, en faveur de son comportement sportif, hérite de nombreuses solutions empruntées aux machines de course. Son moteur représente la dernière évolution du V12 Colombo original. Toujours du type " simple arbre ", il développe dorénavant 280 ch à 7 600 tr/min et, doté de six carburateurs double corps, 300 ch. Mais les grands progrès qui mettent fin à pas mal de critiques concernent la suspension et la transmission. Il s'agit de la première berlinette de production de Maranello à roues arrière indépendantes par triangles superposés (comme à l'avant) et combinés ressorts-amortisseurs réglables. La motricité s'en trouve grandement améliorée, le train arrière ayant moins tendance à décrocher sous fortes accélérations et sur mauvais revêtement. L'autre amélioration concerne le montage de la boîte à cinq rapports directement contre le carter du différentiel, au grand bénéfice de la répartition du poids et de la réduction des masses non suspendues. Le châssis comporte la traditionnelle structure tubulaire rigide typique de Maranello sur l'empattement fétiche de 2,40 m et des roues en alliage léger remplacent les roues à rayons " fil " (disponibles en option). Cet ensemble mécanique homogène, d'une belle maturité technique, est habillé par Pininfarina d'une carrosserie évocatrice d'un prometteur potentiel de puissance : capot long et plongeant, habitacle court et reculé, ligne de toit surbaissée fuyant jusqu'au panneau arrière vertical, hauteur de glace réduite. Presque agressive, la superbe 275 GTB ne laisse rien ignorer de sa musculature et elle démontre ses capacités en compétition, parfois carrossée en aluminium, en prenant notamment la troisième place aux 24 Heures du Mans 1965 (première en GT) derrière deux pures machines de course. Ses qualités sont aussitôt reconnues et la production atteint 250 exemplaires en un an. Au Salon de Paris 1965, la 275 GTB " série 2 " présente une lunette arrière agrandie et une capacité du coffre un peu supérieure. Sur le plan mécanique, l'arbre qui relie rigidement l'embrayage à la boîte-pont est désormais enfermé dans un tube qui garantit un parfait alignement de l'ensemble et réduit les vibrations. Au début 1966, une version C (pour compétition) apparaît qui offre un moteur plus poussé, des allègements sur de nombreux points (mécanique et carrosserie) et un graissage à carter sec. Ce type annonce une 275 encore plus efficace : la GTB/4. Présentée au Salon de Paris 1966, la GTB/4 révèle par son appellation qu'elle bénéficie d'une distribution à quatre arbres à cames en tête, une première sur une routière de Maranello. Ce raffinement provient directement des moteurs installés sur les prototypes à moteur arrière 275 et 330 P de la saison 1965. Les cames attaquent directement les poussoirs de soupape au grand bénéfice des montées en régime déjà brillantes sur la " simple arbre ". Le carter sec expérimenté sur le 275 GTB/C est évidemment retenu, comme les six carburateurs double corps, et si les 300 ch avoués ne traduisent pas un gain de puissance considérable, l'amélioration concerne le couple, les reprises et la souplesse. La " quatre arbres " garantit des relances interdites à toute autre GT à une époque où les limitations de vitesse sur autoroute n'existent pas. Jean-Pierre Beltoise avoue en 1967 avoir parcouru lors d'un essai 75 km en 23 minutes soit une moyenne de 195 km/h … arrêt péage compris. En 1968, la 275 GTB/4 clôture donc brillamment la saga des 250 GT et dérivés qu'il est impossible d'adapter aux nouveaux règlements américains en matière de sécurité passive et de protection de l'environnement. Une époque s'achève. Moins d'un an plus tard, Turin règnera sur la production… M. Chassedieu est le premier propriétaire de cette GTB/4. Il l'a commandée à la Franco Britannic à Paris qui lui délivre le 7 novembre 1967. Une facture d'entretien apparaît dans les registres Pozzi lorsque la voiture n'avait que 800 km. Elle est ensuite reprise par le concessionnaire de Levallois et revendue à un M. Charcot. Ensuite, M. Frédègue l'achète et la revend par l'intermédiaire de Me Poulain au propriétaire actuel qui n'est donc que le 5ème heureux détenteur de cette exceptionnelle voiture. Lorsqu'il l'achète en 1995, il demande à Franck de la faire repeindre entièrement, la peinture étant passée. Il s'aperçoit que la tôle souffrait des affres du temps et ils décident donc de la mettre totalement à nu afin d'atteindre l'état " concours ". Le moteur est également complètement démonté pièce par pièce, refait, remonté. Un livre du suivi complet des travaux avec toutes les photos sera remis au futur propriétaire qui pourra admirer le travail colossal réalisé sur cette voiture, jusque dans les moindres détails. L'intérieur a évidemment bénéficié d'une nouvelle sellerie en cuir noir de la plus belle facture, comme à l'origine, les moquettes y compris. Les travaux ont pris fin l'année dernière et l'auto a reçu les félicitations des équipes Pozzi lors de sa dernière sortie sur le Circuit du Val de Vienne, lors de la manifestation " Ferrari contre le cancer ". Il s'agit du modèle ultime et le plus recherché des 275, celle-ci nous prouvant lors de son essai sa souplesse, son équilibre, son onctuosité, elle est presque aérienne, évoluant comme un souffle inondé d'une musique magistrale. Carte grise française fully restored, matching numbers, French origin The early 1960s confirmed Ferrari's gradual changeover from models intended for competition, and incidentally for the road, to road cars that could be prepared for competition. The famous and constantly improved 'single shaft' V12 Colombo engine from 1947 still provided the mechanical base - and had been highly successful, whether in rallies or endurance events. The trend towards more 'civilized' models was confirmed with the 250 GT/E, the first 2+2 coupé, in 1960; then with the 330 America and 330 2+2 in 1963. The 250 GT Lusso, meanwhile, was clearly more of a roadster de luxe, although retaining the wheelbase of the redoubtable 'short chassis' racing berlinettes - reflecting a tenacious sporting character evidenced by its two-seater design and relative lack of comfort. It was in 1964 that the new 275 GTB berlinette succeeded to this elegant 'hybrid' and the slightly more comfortable 250 GT/L series. The 275 GTB inherited a range of solutions from racing cars. Its engine represented the latest evolution of the original Colombo V12. It was still of the 'single shaft' type, but now produced 280bch at 7600rpm or, with six twin carburettors, 300bch. But the progress which silenced most critics concerned suspension and transmission. This was Maranello's first production-line berlinette with independent back wheels and adjustable shock-absorbers/springs. Motivity was much improved as a result, as the front axle-unit was less inclined to lose its grip during rapid acceleration or on poor surfaces. The other improvement was the mounting of the five-speed gearbox directly against the sump of the differential, much to the advantage of weight-spread. The chassis had Maranello's traditional, rigid tubular structure on its trademark 2.40m wheelbase, with alloy wheels instead of radiating 'wire' wheels (available as an option). This homogenous, technically mature ensemble received Pininfarina bodywork evoking its power potential: a long, plunging bonnet; short cockpit moved further back; lowered roof-line receding down to the vertical back panel with smaller rear window. The superb, almost aggressive 275 GTB showed its racing potential - sometimes with aluminium bodywork - by finishing 3rd at the Le Mans 24 Hours in 1965 (first in GT class) behind two pure racing cars. Its qualities were recognized immediately, and production topped 250 cars inside a year. The 275 GTB 'Series 2' was presented at the 1965 Paris Motor Show, with a larger rear window and slightly bigger boot. In mechanical terms, the shaft rigidly linking the clutch to the transaxle was now enclosed in a tube, ensuring perfect alignment and reduced vibration. At the start of 1966 a C (competition) version appeared with a more powerful engine but lighter bodywork. This paved the way for an even more impressive version of the 275: the GTB/4, first presented at the Paris Motor Show in 1966. As its name suggests, the GTB/4 had four overhead camshafts - a first for a road-car built at Maranello, and a refinement taken directly from the 275 and 330P rear-engine prototypes of 1965. The cams directly attacked the valve pushrods, leading to increased revving (already impressive on the 'single shaft'). The dry sump had been successfully tested on the 275 GTB/C, as had the six twin carburettors; although the 300bhp produced did not represent much gain in power, torque, acceleration and smoothness were all improved. The 'four-shaft' provided acceleration beyond other GTs at a time of no motorway speed limits. In 1967 Jean-Pierre Beltoise claimed to have covered 47 miles in 23 minutes during a test-drive, at an average 122mph… including a stop at a toll. The 275 GTB/4 brought the 250 GT saga to a brilliant close in 1968, and it was impossible to adapt models to new American safety and environmental protection measures. It was the end of an era: within a year, Turin would be reigning supreme over production… The GTB/4's first owner, Mr Chassedieu, ordered it from Franco-Britannic Autos. It was delivered on 7 November 1967. A servicing invoice appears in the Pozzi register after the car's first 500 miles. It was subsequently reacquired by the Levallois dealers and sold to a Mr Charcot, then bought by a Mr Frédègue and sold in 1995 at auction by Hervé Poulain to the consignor, who is therefore the fifth lucky owner of this exceptional car. After buying it he asked Franck to have it entirely resprayed, as the paintwork had faded and the bodywork was the worse for wear. It was stripped down to 'racing' condition, and the engine taken apart, repaired, and reassembled. A booklet recording all the work undertaken, complete with photographs, will be given to the new owner, who will be able to assess all the work done on the car down to the smallest detail. The interior has been exquisitely refitted in new black leather, as per the original, carpet included. Work was completed last year, and the car received the congratulations of the Pozzi teams at its most recent outing on the Val de Vienne Circuit during the 'Ferrari Against Cancer' event. This is the ultimate 275 model, and the one most eagerly sought. During test drives it has shown superb handling, balance and a smoothness that takes the breath away. French title Estimation 750 000 - 850 000 € Sold for 837,474 €

  • FRAFrance
  • 2010-07-09
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Annonce

1879 $4 Stella Coiled Hair Cameo PF-67 NGC

1879 Stella Coiled Hair Cameo PF-67 NGC George T. Morgan, designer (attributed) Obverse: Head of Liberty facing left, wearing diadem inscribed LIBERTY, her hair braided and tightly coiled on top of her head; around, ★6★G★.3★S★.7★C★7★G★R★A★M★S★; below, 1879. Reverse: Large five-pointed star inscribed in incuse: ONE / STELLA / — / 400 / CENTS, in five lines; around outer rim: UNITED STATES OF AMERICA — FOUR DOL.; around, within outer legend: E – PLURIBUS – UNUM — DEO – EST – GLORIA. Condition: NGC Proof 67 Cameo (Certificate number: 1963260-002 – Photo Proof 10-07; previous Photo Proof 04-05 [number 116535-001]). Faint cloudiness over deep, clear, pale yellow surfaces, with superb cameo-effect, and slight weakness at the centers (diagnostic for this issue). A minuscule mint-caused fleck in the reverse field between the star and N of UNUM and a shallow 'dimple' by the right foot of M on the obverse help to identify this fantastic gem. References: This Coin Published: Breen (Encyclopedia) 6409; Breen (Proofs) p. 165; Akers (1976) p. 82; Akers (Patterns) pp. 53, 104; Garrett & Guth (Encyclopedia) p. 170 ("...one of the finest pieces known..."), 570; A Guide Book to United States Coins (The Red Book), 59th ed., 2006, pp. 233, 399; 66th ed., 2013, pp. 252, 424; this piece used to illustrate the type on the NGC Coin Explorer website. Other references: Judd 1638; Pollack 1838; Garrett & Guth, 100 Greatest U.S. Coins. (PCGS 88058) Condition Census: Tied for finest known. NGC records only two other coins of comparable quality, and PCGS a single specimen (though not designated cameo); none finer graded by either service. (07-13) Rarity: Exceptionally rare. All references are in general accordance that the original mintage was only about fifteen pieces (Breen [Proofs] cites ten). The census information which has been published over the years seems to confirm the survival of most though with a fair share of impaired examples. Akers (1975) estimated 13-15 survivors, and Teichman (US Patterns website) positively identifies twelve, including 2 in the Smithsonian. According to the PCGS records of auction appearances, this is the single finest example to have been sold at auction: In its most recent appearance (2005) it more than doubled the price of any 1879 Coiled Hair Stella offered before. Immediately following that sale, according to the Red Book (2006 ed.), it ranked within the upper 40 of the 250 most valuable U.S. coins ever sold. In the most recent Red Book (2013), it still ranks in the top 100. Since the sale of this coin 2005, nothing remotely as fine has been offered at auction (two Proof 63 NGC examples have made four appearances, and in May, 2013 a Proof 64 Cameo PCGS example was sold). Provenance: Gold Rush Collection, Heritage, January 12, 2005, lot 30041, PR 67 Cameo NGC, "one of the very finest known" ($655,500), this coin is number 7 in their census (largely adapted from the US Patterns website); The Western Collection of United States Gold Coins, Stack's, December 12, 1981, lot 1137 ($80,000); a further comparison of catalogue images may further extend this coin's ownership history. However, because of photographs of differing quality, it appears that there are two possibilities, which may intersect at the 1992 Ed Trompeter sale. The Western Collection coin appears to come from a set which appeared in the Stack's 1976 ANA sale, lot 2920 ($225,000); that set, from the Grant Pierce and Son Collection had previously been in the Will W. Neil Collection, B. Max Mehl, June 17, 1947, lots 2602-2605 (sold as a set: $3,850). The identifying 'smudge' between the 9 and the neck appears to be a photographic blemish, and not on the coin. Further plate comparisons of the Tacasyl coin with the Trompeter coin correspond to various identifiers including: on the obverse, a toning "smudge" between the rim and third star, a minute "flake" at the right foot of the M, a toning spot between the S and the last star; and on the reverse, toning flecks between the S and T and T and E of STATES [Note: the reverse enlargement in the Trompeter catalogue is of the wrong coin]; therefore the provenance may also include: Ed Trompeter Collection, Superior Galleries, February 25, 1992, lot 134, Gem Brilliant Proof, "... Pristine ... outstanding." ($198,000) Neither the Neil Collection nor the Western Collection were mentioned in the Trompeter catalogue census for lot 134, and therefore they may substitute the pedigree given in that catalogue of the Lighthouse Sale, Stack's June 16-17, 1978, lot 828 ($90,000), and Rio Rancho Sale, Superior Galleries, October 15, 1974, lot 133 ($105,000). All these pedigree chains are impressive, but prospective bidders should to come to their own opinion. Note: The Stella is one of the few patterns collected alongside adopted issues that saw general circulation. The reason is unknown, but may be a combination of the allure of such an odd denomination and because enough 1879 Flowing Hair examples were struck to make acquiring an example possible for most advanced collectors. Also, perhaps, was the fact that some have clearly seen circulation or have been mounted as jewelry, supposedly given by congressmen to some of Washington, D.C.'s more prominent bordello owners. Regardless of the reason, Stellas have found their way into mainstream collections of regular issue coins.

  • USAUSA
  • 2013-09-24
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1880 $4 Stella Flowing Hair PF-67â605 NGC

1880 $4 Stella Flowing Hair PF-67★ NGC Charles E. Barber, designer Obverse: Head of Liberty facing left, wearing diadem inscribed LIBERTY, hair flowing in long locks; around, ★6★G★.3★S★.7★C★7★G★R★A★M★S★; below, 1880. Reverse: Large five-pointed star inscribed in incuse: ONE / STELLA / — / 400 / CENTS, in five lines; around outer rim: UNITED STATES OF AMERICA — FOUR DOL.; around, within outer legend: E – PLURIBUS – UNUM — DEO – EST – GLORIA. Condition: NGC Proof 67★ (Certificate number: 1963260-003 – Photo Proof 10-07; previous Photo Proof 10-01 [number 1634634-001], PF-67 [without star]: "...this is the finest example of the rare 1880 Flowing Hair type certified by NGC...Perhaps the finest of an estimated two dozen survivors, this fabulous coin is a sheer delight."). A spectacular, beautifully toned coin of medium red gold. This is an unusually well-struck example with the central strands of Liberty's hair well defined. Lightly mirrored fields with subdued, but frosted devices. The central striations seen on all examples are virtually invisible on this specimen. A small mint-caused 'comma' extending from the tail of the first 7 in the peripheral inscription (the Trompeter example has a similar feature), a thin reverse toning line from the right foot of the R of FOUR to the rim, and a tiny raised dot at the tail of the first S in the obverse inscription serve as an identifiers. A magnificent superb gem. References: This Coin Published: Breen (Proofs) p. 167 (5); Akers (Patterns) pp. 53, 85; A Guide Book to United States Coins (The Red Book), 59th ed., 2006, p. 402; this piece used to illustrate the type on the NGC Coin Explorer website. Other references: Judd 1635; Pollack 1832; Breen (Encyclopedia) 6410; Akers (1976) pp. 80-81, 103-104; Garrett & Guth (Encyclopedia) p. 170; Garrett & Guth, 100 Greatest U.S. Coins. (PCGS 8059) Condition Census: Tied for finest known. Perhaps the finest; while NGC records only two other examples as Proof 67 (cameo), this is the only example to bear the star designation for eye appeal. PCGS has graded a single coin at this grade, with the cameo designation. Neither firm has graded anything finer. As the Sotheby's/Stack's cataloguers of the H. Jeff Browning (Dallas Bank) Collection stated, "it is hard to imagine any of comparable quality." Garrett and Guth, noted it is one of the finest seen by them, and graded the Smithsonian's example as Proof 65, two full points lower than this exceptional coin. (07-13) Rarity: Exceedingly rare. An underappreciated rarity, perhaps because it is the same design as the much more abundant 1879 flowing hair issue. Breen (Proofs) estimated only 15 struck, a figure that Akers agrees with (but notes that a second, smaller mintage, must have supplemented the original number). Garrett and Guth suggest a total mintage of only 25 coins and a survival of about 15 to 20 pieces (which Teichman's census appears to bear out). The PCGS census of auction prices (which is reasonably comprehensive back to 1979) lists no Proof 67 examples having ever been offered at auction (with the exception of this specimen, which was sold uncertified in 2001 and, by nearly $100,000, exceeded the highest price ever recorded to that date for an example of this variety). Nothing remotely comparable to this example has appeared at auction in more than a decade, but a Proof 66 (NGC) example was sold in January, 2013. Regardless of the total number known, as noted above, few, if any, can match this remarkable coin, superbly preserved and with a distinguished pedigree. Even five years after its 2001 auction appearance it ranked among the Red Book's (2006 ed.) top 250 auction prices realized. Provenance: H. Jeff Browning Collection ("The Dallas Bank Collection"), Sotheby's/Stack's, October 29-30, 2001, lot 362, Gem Brilliant Proof, "... Monumental" ($241,500); Dr. John E. Wilkison Collection (via David W. Akers and Mike Brownlee prior to 1973). Note: When Mint engravers approached the design of the international coinage, they had any number of challenges to overcome. As noted above, the issues of alloy, weight, and how to express the intrinsic value of the coin internationally were all cleverly and quite simply dealt with. But, it should be remembered that the Stella was also meant to circulate in the United States (where an understanding of the metric standard was not then, and is still not, commonplace) and it also had to meet certain legal requirements regarding various portions of its design; so, the obverse bore a head (and inscription) emblematic of Liberty, while the reverse bore the inscriptions UNITED STATES OF AMERICA and E PLURIBUS UNUM. The use of the motto IN GOD WE TRUST was optional at this time, and was replaced by the DEO EST GLORIA (the Glory is God's). The denomination was expressed in three different ways: 400 Cents, Four Dol., and finally One Stella (within the star for which the denomination was named). Despite the number of competing design elements, the Stellas are well-conceived, uncluttered and, like so many unadopted patterns, in many ways artistically superior to the designs ultimately accepted for circulation. As also noted above, Congressional interest in the proposed international coinage caused that body to order more examples for the membership; according to Breen (Encyclopedia) many of the 1879 dated issues were in fact struck in 1880 (in January, April, and May). However, the concept of the international coinage was scuttled by legislators when no difference in the alloys could be readily distinguished (the standard circulating U.S. coins were .900 pure, and the Stellas .857 pure). Nevertheless, the concept of a Four Dollar gold piece did greatly appeal to numismatists as an oddity and the two issues of 1880 are widely accepted as having been produced for well-placed collectors of pattern coinage.

  • USAUSA
  • 2013-09-24
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1930 BENTLEY SPEED SIX 6,5 L TOURER LE MANS

1930 BENTLEY SPEED SIX 6,5 L TOURER LE MANS Châssis n° SB 2775 Moteur n° NH 2736 S Walter Owen Bentley, ingénieur ferroviaire passé à l'automobile puis aux moteurs aéronautiques pendant la Première Guerre mondiale, mit son expérience de motoriste à profit en concevant en 1919 une voiture de sport à moteur trois litres quatre cylindres très inspiré par le moteur Mercedes à arbre à cames en tête de 1914. Particularités : le moteur Bentley avait un bloc-cylindres et une culasse, coulés en une seule pièce et quatre soupapes par cylindre. La Bentley trois litres produite jusqu'en 1929 à plus de 1600 exemplaires remporta les 24 Heures du Mans 1924. Dans la foulée de ce type réussi, Bentley et ses commanditaires visèrent une clientèle plus exigeante en étudiant une six-cylindres de 6,5 litres clairement opposée à la nouvelle Rolls-Royce Phantom I. Cette première Bentley Six, lancée fin 1925, bénéficia de l'adoption d'une commande de distribution originale très silencieuse par bielles et excentriques, inspirée par le système bielle et manivelle des locomotives. Sur un marché du luxe restreint, mais très encombré, ces performantes mais coûteuses voitures eurent du mal à s'imposer malgré la réputation que la marque se forgea par ses victoires au Mans de 1927 à 1930, les succès de 1929 et 1930 étant signés par les nouvelles Speed Six apparues l'année précédente. Cette version résultait d'une refonte de la 6.5 Litre dont le caractère sportif fut plus affirmé. Outre un radiateur plus grand à côtés parallèles, la voiture avait un moteur plus puissant grâce à un rapport de compression supérieur et à deux carburateurs. Les clients sportifs avaient souhaité retrouver avec la 6.5 Litre la vivacité de la première trois-litres, plus légère, mais la première six-cylindres avait déçu, entraînant la création de la 4,5 litres à quatre cylindres. La nouvelle Speed Six devait atteindre un niveau de performance digne de la marque en remportant, outre deux fois les 24 Heures du Mans, plusieurs grandes épreuves d'endurance britanniques. C'est cette même Speed Six habillée d'une carrosserie spéciale profilée qui fit parler d'elle en 1930 en battant de quatre heures, pilotée par Woolf Barnato, patron de la firme, la liaison ferroviaire entre Cannes et Londres. La voiture présentée n° SB 2775 prit la route en juillet 1930, habillée d'une carrosserie de limousine réalisée par Lancefield sur ce châssis de 12' 6'' ( 382 cm) d'empattement. Dès 1938, elle fut recarrossée en tourer Le Mans par Corsica. Acquise en 2002 par l'actuel propriétaire auprès du négociant britannique Stanley Mann, spécialiste des Bentley Vintage, elle a été depuis régulièrement conduite et entretenue. Cette formidable machine est prête à reprendre la route. Carte grise française Titre britannique V5 Walter Owen Bentley began his career as a railway engineer before going into automobiles (then aero-engines during World War I). He made full use of all his mechanical experience in 1919 to design a sports car with a four-cylinder, 3-litre engine, much influenced by the Mercedes overhead camshaft engine of 1914. The Bentley engine had a cylinder-block and cylinder-head cast in a single piece, and four valves per cylinder. This Bentley 3-Litre won the Le Mans 24 Hours in 1924, and 1,600 of these cars had been produced by 1929. Its success prompted Bentley and his backers to target a more demanding clientèle by planning a six-cylinder 6 1/2-Litre, no doubt in response to the new Rolls-Royce Phantom I. This first Bentley Six, launched at the end of 1925, boasted an original, very quiet distribution system using connecting rods and eccentrics, inspired by a locomotive's rod and crankshaft system. This high-performance, albeit costly, car struggled to make its mark on the limited yet overcrowded luxury market, despite Bentley's burgeoning reputation in the wake of their Le Mans victories from 1927-30. The wins in 1929/30 were obtained by the new Speed Six launched in 1928 as a more sporting version of the 6 1/2-Litre, with a larger radiator and more powerful engine, thanks to a higher compression-ratio and two carburettors. Race-minded clients had hoped the 6 1/2-Litre would display the same vivacity as the first, lighter 3-Litre, but the initial six-cylinder proved a disappointment - prompting the design of the new, four-cylinder 4 1/2-Litre. The new Speed Six soon reached levels of performance worthy of the marque by twice winning the Le Mans 24 Hours, along with several major British endurance events. This same Speed Six, with special streamlined bodywork, hit the headlines in 1930 when, driven by the firm's chairman (and Surrey wicket-keeper) Woolf Barnato, it raced the Blue Train from Cannes to Calais and on to London (via Dover), winning by four hours. The car presented here, n° SB 2775, was made in July 1930 with limousine bodywork by Lancefield on this chassis with a 12' 6'' (3.82m) wheelbase; the body was reworked by Corsica as a Le Mans Tourer in 1938. It was acquired by its current owner from the British dealer and Vintage Bentley specialist Stanley Mann in 2002, and has since been regularly driven and maintained. It is a formidable machine, and ready for the road. French registration "carte grise" British title V5 Estimation 390 000 - 440 000 € Sold for 736,710 €

  • FRAFrance
  • 2010-07-09
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1972 LAMBORGHINI P400 MIURA SV

1972 LAMBORGHINI P400 MIURA SV Châssis n° 5104 Moteur n° 30752 La Lamborghini Miura P400 définitive, présentée au Salon de Genève 1966, habillée par Bertone d'une carrosserie aux lignes à la fois viriles et sensuelles signées Marcello Gandini, fit l'effet d'une bombe. Ses caractéristiques mécaniques étaient à la hauteur de son style et Ferruccio Lamborghini, qui avait voulu inquiéter un Enzo Ferrari sceptique quant à ses capacités de constructeur, réussit pleinement son coup. Les choix techniques distinguaient totalement la Miura des productions de Maranello, destinées à la route qui venaient tout récemment d'acquérir des roues arrière indépendantes : le châssis plate-forme très élaboré était à la fois rigide et plus léger que le châssis tubulaire des Ferrari et la position arrière centrale du moteur monté en travers fit date. La direction à crémaillère était aussi un avantage pour la précision et la réponse par rapport au boîtier de ses rivales. Le moteur quatre litres à 12 cylindres en V et 4 ACT (conçu initialement par Giotto Bizzarrini) qui équipait déjà les 400 GT avait été poussé à 350 ch en version standard et à 430 en version Sprint (données constructeur à l'époque). Son architecture en faisait un bijou de mécanique avec une seule pièce coulée en alliage léger, réunissant les blocs-cylindres, le carter supérieur et ceux de la boîte-pont, l'ensemble exigeant des usinages et des montages d'une extrême précision. Chaque Miura était assemblée manuellement comme un prototype. La nouvelle Lamborghini fit tourner les têtes, devenant aussitôt la supercar à posséder pour ceux qui en avaient les moyens, à la fois pour ses performances et pour son style. Ferruccio Lamborghini avait toutes les raisons d'être fier de cette création à nulle autre pareille. Toutefois, il voulut faire mieux encore et, par une succession de retouches et d'améliorations, parvint à proposer la plus puissante P400 S en 1969 suivie en 1971 de la P400 SV, considérée comme la meilleure des Miura. Plus performante et dotée d'un comportement dynamique raffiné, la P400 SV avait bénéficié de longues années de mises au point. Châssis, trains roulants, suspensions, caractéristiques aérodynamiques, roues (des Campagnolo spéciales), détails de carrosserie et moteur plus souple définissaient une voiture pas forcément plus rapide (285 km/h quand même !), mais plus sûre, plus facile à contrôler et dotée de meilleures reprises. Ses concepteurs même la jugèrent " différente " des P400 et P400 S, en la créditant d'un comportement à grande vitesse beaucoup plus rigoureux et précis. Apogée de la Miura, la P400 SV fut la dernière Lamborghini produite sous la supervision personnelle de Ferruccio Lamborghini qui céda ses parts dans Automobili Lamborghini SpA en avril 1972. Cette sublime Miura SV #5104 est la 6ème avant-dernière SV sortie des chaînes de production. Son numéro de production est 757 et tous les éléments, portières, capots avant et arrière, ailettes de capot arrière portent le même numéro. Nous sommes en face d'un exemplaire exceptionnel à tous points de vue puisqu'elle n'a parcouru que 5 600 km depuis sa sortie d'usine. Vendue neuve au Guatemala, via le concessionnaire Lamborghini, Herrera, de Madrid, le 22 septembre 1972, cette SV est livrée dans son superbe coloris Rosso Granada avec intérieur en cuir beige, air conditionné, radio Autovox, ceintures de sécurité : tout est indiqué sur la facture originale qui sera fournie au futur acquéreur. La voiture est ensuite achetée et importée par un Belge dénommé Galina (document original d'importation fourni) le 9 février 1990. Il la garde pendant onze ans (nouvelle peinture dans la couleur d'origine dans cette période-là) avant de la vendre à l'actuel propriétaire en 2001. Le mécanicien du vendeur, Franck Opderbeck, remplace alors les étriers, tout le circuit de refroidissement dont la tuyauterie est fabriquée en inox, révise complètement l'allumage et la carburation ainsi que la climatisation et change le vase d'expansion. Les quatre pneus n'ont que 1000 km. Cet exemplaire de troisième main seulement est certainement la plus belle Miura SV en circulation, affichant un kilométrage d'origine des plus faibles, un intérieur jamais remplacé et strictement d'origine dans un état époustouflant. Elle est " matching numbers " en tous points et fonctionne de manière optimale, nous l'avons constaté lors de l'essai effectué pour le film. A son volant, tous vos sens sont sollicités : l'odorat, dès que vous prenez place dans son baquet, le parfum de l'authenticité vous pénètre, le toucher avec la caresse du volant gainé de cuir et la douceur du pommeau de vitesse, la vue avec votre regard attiré par les voluptueuses courbes du capot et le moteur vibrant dans le rétroviseur, l'ouïe pour la musique époustouflante du V12 et ses montées en régime et enfin…le goût parce qu'il s'agit simplement de la dévorer à moins qu'elle ne vous dévore avant. Il est clair qu'il s'agit du modèle le plus désirable et le plus abouti de cette lignée de GT dont le dessin magistral signé Gandini a marqué à jamais l'histoire de l'automobile. Un mythe… et une réalité. Carte grise française The definitive Lamborghini Miura P400, fitted by Bertone with virile yet sensuous bodywork designed by Marcello Gandini, created a sensation when it was unveiled at the Geneva Motor Show in 1966. Its mechanical characteristics were equally top-grade. Ferruccio Lamborghini had been keen to impress Enzo Ferrari, who had voiced scepticism about his ability as a constructor. He did just that. The Miura's technical specifications were totally different from cars being produced at Maranello, which were designed for the road and had only recently acquired independent rear wheels. The Miura's elaborate chassis was both rigid and lighter than Ferrari's tubular chassis, and the engine's mid-mounted positioning (rear wheel drive) would prove a landmark. Its rack-and-pinion steering was also superior to its rivals' when it came to precision and response. The 12-cylinder, 4-litre V/ACT engine (initially designed by Giotto Bizzarrini), which already equipped the 400 GT, had been upped to 350bhp in the standard version, and 430bhp in the Sprint version (manufacturer's contemporary data). It was a bijou of mechanical construction: a single piece cast in light alloy, uniting the cylinder blocks, sump and transaxle. The ensemble required high-precision machining and mounting, and each Miura was assembled manually, like a prototype. The new Lamborghini caused quite a stir, promptly becoming the must-own supercar amongst those who could afford it - both for its performance- levels and its style. Ferruccio Lamborghini had every reason to be proud of this matchless creation. Even so, he wanted to go even further and, after various modifications and improvements, came up with the more powerful P400 S in 1969, followed in 1971 by the P400 SV - considered the finest of all Miuras. The refined, dynamic P400 SV had benefited from years of development, and had higher performance-levels. The chassis, axle-units, suspension, aerodynamics, wheels (Campagnolo specials), body detail and smoother engine defined a car that was not necessarily faster (180mph even so), but safer, easier to handle and with better acceleration. Even its designers thought it 'different' from the P400 and P400 S, crediting it with far more rigorous and precise road-holding at high speed. The P400 SV represented the pinnacle of Miura achievement, and was the last Lamborghini produced under Ferruccio Lamborghini's personal supervision - he sold his shares in Automobili Lamborghini SpA in April 1972. This sublime Miura SV 5104 was the sixth-last SV off the production line. Its production number is 757 and all components (doors, front and rear bonnets, rear fins) bear the same number. It is exceptional from every point of view, as it has only done 3,500 miles since leaving the factory. Sold new to Guatemala on 22 September 1972 through Lamborghini's Madrid dealer Herrera, this SV has superb Rosso Granada livery and a beige leather interior, air conditioning, Autovox radio and safety-belts: all mentioned on the original invoice, which the buyer will receive. The car was subsequently bought and imported by a Belgian named Galina (original import document supplied) on 9 February 1990. He kept it for 11 years (repainting it in its original colour) before selling it to the current owner in 2001.The vendor's mechanic, Franck Opderbeck, then replaced the callipers and the entire cooling circuit (with stainless steel pipes), and thoroughly revised the ignition system, carburation and air-conditioning. The four tyres have driven only 625 miles. This example, only third-hand, is surely the finest Miura SV in circulation, with very few miles on the clock and a never-replaced, strictly original interior in dazzling condition. It is 'matching numbers' in every respect, and drives supremely well, as we observed during practice for the film. All five senses are solicited at the wheel: smell - you are assailed by the whiff of authenticity as soon as you sit down; touch - as you handle the leather-lined steering wheel and soft gear-knob; sight - with your eyes attracted to the bonnet's voluptuous curves and the engine vibrating in the rear mirror; hearing - the staggering music of the V12 as it revs up; and finally… taste - you'd better devour this car, or it will devour you first! This is clearly the most desirable and accomplished model from the masterly GT range designed by Gandini, which has left a permanent mark on automobile history. A myth… yet a reality. French registration "carte grise" Estimation 500 000 - 600 000 € Sold for 667,500 €

  • FRAFrance
  • 2010-07-09
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1836 $5 Ultra Cameo PF-67★ NGC

1836 $5 Ultra Cameo PF-67★ NGC William Kneass, designer (after John Reich); refined by Christian Gobrecht Obverse: Head of Liberty facing left, her hair bound in a fillet on which LIBERTY is inscribed, her hair curled and falling to the base of her neck; around, thirteen stars; below, 1836. Reverse: Heraldic eagle, head facing left, with shield emblazoned on its chest holding olive branch and three arrows in its talons; around, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA; below, 5 D. Condition: NGC Proof 67★ Ultra Cameo (Certificate number: 1963262-002 – Photo Proof 10-05; previous Photo Proof 10-07 [number 2019387-009] "This delightful proof is the only one certified by NGC, confirming its important status." Deeply mirrored, almost 'black' limpid fields highlight the richly frosted designs. Struck from incredibly dense, dark gold, with dies so fresh that a few raised die polish lines are still visible (these are part of the manufacturing process and not defects). Star nine slightly flat, which is a feature shared by all the known examples. A spectacular coin without peer. References: This Coin Published: Garrett & Guth (Encyclopedia) p. 286. Other references: Breen (Encyclopedia) 6510; Breen (Proofs) p. 65 (this example unknown); Akers (1979) pp. 86-87. (PCGS 45300) Condition Census: The finest known. NGC has graded no other examples as perfectly preserved as this piece; the other Proof 67 graded by NGC (probably the Pittman example) lacks both the Ultra Cameo and star designations; PCGS has graded nothing even remotely as fine (Proof 63 cameo, the finest). (07-13) Rarity: Of the highest rarity. Breen (in both Proofs and Encyclopedia) knew of only two examples, that in the National Coin Collection in the Smithsonian, and the example he identified as 'NY Specialist' (John J. Pittman). Akers (1979) concurred, but when he sold the Pittman Collection (1997), he cited the existence of a third example and, more recently (2000) a fourth (not nearly as fine as the other three) was discovered. The list of known examples includes the National Coin Collection (Smithsonian) example; John J. Pittman (Part 1 [October 1997], lot 938); Brian Hendelson, 1996 (this coin), as part of a complete proof set; Harry Bass Collection (Part 4 [November 2000], lot 344). Only three auction appearances of this exceptionally rare issue have been recorded since the Farouk sale in 1954. As with the proof quarter eagle of 1836 in the present sale (lot 1002), for a number of years NGC had not deleted the original certification number for this coin when it was re-holdered in 2007. This gave the false impression that there was another coin as perfectly preserved as the Tacasyl coin. NGC has corrected this error, confirming the unique finest-known status of this amazing coin. Provenance: The Rarities Sale, Bowers and Merena Galleries, July 31, 2000, lot 580 (part); prior to August 2000, the complete 8-piece set was sold to a private collector for a reported $1,000,000 (according to PCGS Coin Facts website); Brian Hendelson, 1996; Anonymous Philadelphia family (as part of a complete 1836 proof set, owned since the date of issue). Note: The design development of the Classic Head half eagle is essentially the same as the quarter eagle (described above in lot 1002). As has been explained in some detail by Breen (Encyclopedia), the passage of the Mint Act of June 28, 1834 (which reduced the weight and purity of all gold coins) required the production of a substantial number of new dies which would clearly differentiate the new issues from the 'old tenor' coinage. The re-use of John Reich's Empire head (which Breen, peculiarly, saw as androgynous), and the elimination of the motto, E PLURIBUS UNUM, were the two distinctly new design elements. Producing the large number of dies was a chore as so many different design elements had to be imparted by hand and over the short life of the design numerous small adjustments were made, first by Kneass and then, following his stroke in August 1835, by Christian Gobrecht, who created a series of transitional designs which culminated with his coronet design in 1839. Although the specific authorization and purpose for the striking of Proof coins in 1836 has thus far eluded researchers (Breen [Proofs] suggested sets may have produced early in the year to celebrate the admission of Arkansas as a state, or late in the year in anticipation of Michigan's admission), it is logical to infer that they were produced for presentation purposes, possibly, as with the 1834/1804 proof sets as diplomatic gifts. The two 1836 gold proofs in this sale have been together since the year they were struck, and together represent the finest 1836 gold proof set obtainable.

  • USAUSA
  • 2013-09-24
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1891 $20 Ultra Cameo PF-68â605 NGC

1891 $20 Ultra Cameo PF-68★ NGC James B. Longacre, William Barber, designers Obverse: Head of Liberty facing left, wearing a bejeweled coronet on which LIBERTY is emblazoned; around, thirteen stars; below, 1891. Reverse: Heraldic eagle, head facing left, with spread wings and shield emblazoned on its chest holding olive branch and three arrows in its talons; above, IN GOD WE / TRUST in two lines within an oval of thirteen stars amidst rays of Glory; around, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA; below, TWENTY DOLLARS. Condition: NGC Proof 68★ Ultra Cameo (Certificate number: 1963253-015 – Photo Proof 10-07; previous certificate number [on or before 11-05]: 1704497-001). An absolutely amazing, nearly indescribable gem of the first water. An intense, razor-sharp strike, fathomless, mirrored surfaces with devices that are as richly and fully frosted as can be imagined. A minuscule (mint-caused) dimple on Liberty's cheek is diagnostic, which with an infinitesimal (also mint-caused) depression to the right of the upper serif of the F in OF serve as pedigree points of identification. Virtually as perfect as the day it left the dies. Immaculate, and by consensus without peer. References: This Coin Published: Breen (Proofs) p. 192, 7; Akers (1982) p. 199; Garrett & Guth (Encyclopedia) p. 505 ("Finest Proof $20 ever seen."); Bowers (Guide Book of Double Eagles) p. 183, this piece illustrated . Other references: Breen (Encyclopedia) 7307. (PCGS 99107) Condition Census: The finest known, not only for the date, but for the entire Liberty Head series (1850-1907): Jeff Garrett has lauded it as the "The finest Proof $20 ever seen." Needless to say, this is the finest graded by NGC, and PCGS has graded none finer than Proof 66. A review of the combined census reports for both NGC and PCGS reveals that of the more than one million Liberty Head double eagles graded (both proof and business strikes) a mere six have been graded as 68, and this example gains pride of place as the only example with the star designation; simply put, no Liberty Head double eagle has ever been certified as perfectly preserved as this coin. (07-13) Rarity: Extremely rare, one of the key dates of the entire denomination, with a mere 1,390 business strikes and 52 proofs produced. Breen (Proofs) specifically identified fourteen examples (including the present lot); Akers (1982) estimated a survival of 20 to 25 pieces, an estimate with which more recently Garrett and Guth have concurred. Regardless of the number of survivors of the date, this specimen, which has been published as the most perfectly preserved of all Liberty head proof double eagles is, for all intents and purposes, unique. Provenance: The Clausen Family Collection, Heritage, January 5, 2006, lot 3581, PR68★ Ultra Cameo NGC (11-05)[certificate number: 1704497-001], "Spectacular ... phenomenal ... virtually flawless" ($299,000); Harry W. Bass, Jr. Collection, Part II, Bowers and Merena, October 2-4, 1999, lot 1906 Proof-67 PCGS, "Memorable ... incredible ... no peer" ($166,750); Gaston DiBello Collection, Stack's, May 14-16, 1970, lot 1281; believed to be (according to Breen [Proofs]) "A Memorable Collection" [Jacob Shapiro/J.F. Bell], Numismatic Galleries [Abe Kosoff and Abner Kreisberg], March 1-2, 1948, lot 711. Note: The 1891 Double Eagle displays the third and last design change for the Liberty head double eagles. In 1877 the reverse design was altered to spell out the denomination in full: TWENTY DOLLARS. Since the denomination's inception as a circulating coin in 1850, for reasons unknown the value had only been abbreviated TWENTY D. It may be that Mint officials used the abbreviated version to keep a degree of uniformity with the other then-circulating denominations (quarter eagle through eagle) which also abbreviated the word dollar (of course the tiny gold dollar, which was developed as a contemporary of the double eagle, had the word spelled out in full from the start, as did the three dollar gold piece). The larger size of the double eagle planchet would certainly have not been an impediment to spelling it out in full (as the re-design in 1877 proves). In 1891 the design had another 16 years to run before Theodore Roosevelt hatched his plan to have Saint-Gaudens design a coin worthy of the ancients (though ironically the inspiration for Liberty's portrait on this coin was the enormous cult statue heads of the ancient Romans).

  • USAUSA
  • 2013-09-24
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1962 MERCEDES BENZ 300 SL ROADSTER AVEC HARD TOP

¤ 1962 MERCEDES BENZ 300 SL ROADSTER AVEC HARD TOP Châssis n° 198 042 10 003 070 Moteur n° 198 982 0000 025 en aluminium En 1954, au Salon de New York, l'importateur de voitures de luxe et de sport européennes, Max Hoffman présente deux nouvelles Mercedes de sport : la 190 SL et la 300 SL de route. Celle-ci est une adaptation à usage routier de la 300 SL de compétition qui se caractérise par ses portes " papillon ". Quoique plus civilisée que les voitures d'usine, la 300 SL client reste une voiture pour amateurs de pilotage dans laquelle le confort a été sacrifié à l'efficacité. Notamment l'accès à bord reste difficile en raison de la hauteur des seuils de porte et cette seule particularité en limite la diffusion aux Etats-Unis, son principal marché. Mercedes-Benz en écoule quand même 1 400 exemplaires en quatre ans, mais confronté à une baisse de la demande en 1956, le constructeur cède encore aux pressions américaines et en propose une version décapotable, le Roadster, présenté à Genève en mars 1957. Sa particularité la plus visible réside dans l'adoption de portes conventionnelles grâce à une modification du châssis par ailleurs renforcé pour compenser l'élimination du toit. Ce splendide cabriolet d'allure aussi musclée que le coupé " papillon ", s'adresse à une clientèle plus férue de grand tourisme que de performances, mais la partie mécanique déjà raffinée a encore été améliorée. Le moteur toujours alimenté par injection directe délivre 250 ch SAE et les derniers roadsters de 1962-63 recevront un bloc en aluminium et quatre freins à disque. La vitesse de pointe d'environ 230 km/h convient largement à un cabriolet grand tourisme. Une autre importante amélioration concerne l'adoption d'un nouveau train arrière, toujours du type à essieu brisé, mais dont le point d'articulation a été abaissé et qui comporte en plus un ressort compensateur horizontal. Les variations de carrossage à l'arrière sont réduites et la tenue de route en virage devient moins … surprenante ! Ces raffinements mécaniques attirent une nouvelle clientèle et les ventes du Roadster atteindront 1858 exemplaires soit 400 de plus que celles du coupé " papillon ". Grâce à ses qualités routières, à son agrément de conduite et à son style d'une rare élégance insensible au passage du temps, la 300 SL Roadster voit sa cote se renforcer constamment. La voiture présentée est une 300 SL Roadster 1962 à bloc aluminium (matching numbers) et freins à disque dont la restauration confiée au Garage Dupertuis à Aigle (Suisse) a été facturée en mai 2005 pour un montant total de plus de CHF38,000. Le dossier très détaillé qui accompagne la voiture précise notamment les travaux mécaniques suivants (sous-traités à Duam Motor SA) : démontage complet du moteur suite (pour cause de fonctionnement insatisfaisant) et nettoyage chimique et sablage, rectification du volant moteur, honage des cylindres, réfection des pistons (gorges et segmentation, axes et arrêtoirs), traitement des pistons au molygraphite, montage et ajustage des coussinets de bielles et de paliers, réfection des bielles, équilibrage de l'ensemble vilebrequin-embrayage, réfection des passages d'huile, commande de distribution (pignon et chaine), réfection des soupapes, des sièges et des culbuteurs, remplacement du filtre à air métallique par un élément moderne, réfection du système d'injection (pompes et injecteurs) et des canalisations d'essence et d'huile, réfection de l'allumage, embrayage neuf, révision et remise en état de la commande de démarrage, révision des freins et réglage de la direction (timonerie et géométrie), installation d'un coupe-circuit, mise au point, etc. Il s'agit du meilleur modèle et de la plus aboutie des 300 SL Roadster. La peinture gris métallisé ainsi que l'intérieur cuir noir sont en superbe état. Il est très rare de trouver un roadster à bloc alu et freins à disques, accompagné en plus de son hard-top dont le propriétaire avait installé un système de stockage mobile, permettant de le poser sans effort sur la caisse. Plus qu'une automobile, un mythe. Cette automobile est livrée avec un titre de circulation suisse, les droits et taxes à l'importation seront à acquitter par l'acheteur dans le pays de destination It was Max Hoffman, an importer of European luxury sports and cars, who presented two new Mercedes sports models at the 1954 New York Auto Show: the 190 SL and the 300 SL Roadster. The latter was an adaptation, for road use, of the 300 SL sports car with its distinctive 'gull-wing' doors. Although more civilized than a factory car, the 300 SL remained a car for drivers who preferred performance over comfort. In fact, access remained tricky due to the height of the doors, which limited sales in the United States, its principal market. Mercedes-Benz nonetheless sold 1,400 cars in four years but, faced with a slump in demand in 1956, again bowed to American pressure and proposed a convertible version, the Roadster, unveiled in Geneva in March 1957. The most visible feature was its conventional doors, made possible by changes to the chassis, now strengthened to compensate for the removal of the roof. This splendid cabriolet, just as rugged in appearance as the 'gull-wing' coupé, targeted clients more interested in a grand tourer than a racing car. Even so, the refined mechanics had been further improved. The engine, still using direct injection, delivered 250bhp SAE, while the last roadsters of 1962/3 would receive an aluminium block and four disc brakes. A top speed of over 140mph was ample for cabriolet gran turismo. Another major improvement concerned the adoption of a new rear end, still of the broken-axle type but with a lowered articulation point and horizontal compensator spring. Variations to the rear body were reduced, and road-holding around bends became less… unpredictable. These mechanical refinements attracted a new clientèle, and sales of the Roadster reached 1,858 - 400 more than for the 'gull-wing' coupé. Thanks to its qualities on the road, easy driving, and timeless elegance, the popularity of the 300 SL Roadster continued to climb. The car offered here is a 1962 300 SL Roadster with disc brakes and aluminium block (matching numbers), restored by Garage Dupertuis in Aigle (Switzerland) at a cost of over CHF38,000 in May 2005. The detailed dossier that comes with the car contains a break-down of the following mechanical work carried out (sub-contracted to Duam Motor SA): full dismantlement and cleaning of the engine suite (due to unsatisfactory performance); resurfacing of the flywheel; honing of the cylinders; repairing of pistons (grooves, segmentation, pawls); molygraphite treatment of pistons; mounting and adjusting of connecting-rod bushings and main bearings; repairing of connecting rods; balancing of crankshaft/clutch; repairing of oil passages, distribution (drive pinion and chain); repairs to valves and rocker arms; replacing of metal air-filter by a modern filter; repairs to injection system (pumps and injectors) and the oil and fuel passages; repair of ignition; new clutch; repair of starter; checking brakes and correcting the steering; installing a cut-out switch, etc. This is the finest and the most accomplished of the 300 SL Roadsters. The metallic grey paintwork and black leather interior are in superb condition. It is rare to find a roadster with an aluminium block and disc brakes, and this one also has a hard-top with mobile storage system installed by the owner. More than an automobile - a myth! This car is coming with Swiss registration papers, import duties and taxes will apply to the buyer in the country of destination Estimation 430 000 - 500 000 € Sold for 502,302 €

  • FRAFrance
  • 2010-07-09
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Annonce

1907 $20 Saint Gaudens High Relief PF-69 NGC

1907 $20 Saint Gaudens High Relief PF-69 NGC Augustus Saint-Gaudens, designer; Henry Hering modeler; modified by Charles Barber Obverse: Liberty striding forward, wearing flowing gown, and hair blowing in the wind; her left foot on a rock, beside which is an oak branch; she holds a lighted torch in her right hand, and an olive branch in her left. To her lower right, a small representation of the Capitol building, behind which 23 rays of the sun emanate, around, 46 stars; above, LIBERTY; at lower right, M•C•M•VII. Around, broad border. Reverse: Eagle flying left, across rays of the sun; above, •UNITED•STATES•OF•AMERICA• / •TWENTY•DOLLARS• in two lines. Edge: E✴PLURIBUS✴UNUM✴✴✴✴✴✴✴✴✴✴✴ in Roman Face letters from triple-segment collar. Condition: NGC Proof 69 Wire Rim (Certificate number: 1963253-016 – Photo Proof 10-07; previous Photo Proof 10-05 [number 163434-001]). Wire rim. Warm, softly satiny fields, with the Mint-made swirls of raised die polish lines that are a hallmark. The small shadow at the rim at 5.30 on the obverse is not a flaw, but a raised, mint-caused bulge of metal. Under 10 power magnification three or four mint-made specks can be seen above the leading edge of the eagle's front wing and help to identify this exceptional coin (these can also be seen on the Browning collection example). Simply spectacular, and as the grade suggests the coin is mint-fresh, and essentially unimprovable. References: This Coin Published: Garrett & Guth (Encyclopedia) p. 511, 573; Bowers (A Guide Book of Double Eagles) p. 233; A Guide Book to United States Coins (The Red Book), 60th – 65 eds., 2007 - 2012; A Guide Book to United States Coins (The Red Book) 66th ed., 2013, pp. 278, 425; this coin cited on the NGC Coin Explorer website in Jeff Garrett's Description and Analysis: "The finest High Relief graded by NGC is a PR 69 that sold for $534,000 in 2005." Other references: Breen (Proofs) p. 209; Breen (Encyclopedia) 7358; Akers (1982) pp. 282-285. (PCGS 9136) Condition Census: Tied for finest known, or the finest (although until recently one other coin appeared in the NGC census), none finer; PCGS (which does not acknowledge the Proof term for Saint-Gaudens high relief issues) has graded a single Mint State 69 example and none finer. (07-13) Rarity: While scarce as a type, the high relief Saint-Gaudens double eagles are probably the most popular coins in the entire gold series. The combined number graded at both NGC and PCGS (which, naturally, includes a fair number of re-submissions) exceeds 8,500 pieces, or approximately two-thirds of the total produced. However, the air gets much thinner when one realizes that only two examples (or approximately two-one-hundredths of one percent) have been graded as perfectly preserved as the present lot. Jeff Garrett on the NGC website notes this example as the finest graded by NGC (however, the 2005 Photo Proof cites one other at this grade, and the 2007 Photo Proof adds yet another; but as noted above, the current census cites only this single coin). A remarkably rare coin, especially when one takes into consideration that of the approximately 1.8 million Saint-Gaudens double eagles (proof and business strike) graded by the big-two firms, only about a dozen 69s have been graded; and this, as one of the most admired and desired designs in the entire US coin series is in a class apart. Since the Morse Collection sale in 2005,no examples of comparable grade have appeared at auction (apart from reappearances of the MS 69 Morse coin). Provenance: The Philip H. Morse Collection of Saint Gaudens Coinage, Heritage, November 3, 2005, lot 6529, Flat Rim PR 69 NGC (Certificate number: 163434-001), "Possible Finest known 1907 Specimen Striking .... essentially perfect..." ($534,750) ) [Note: Although catalogued in the Morse sale as a flat rim, it is a wire rim specimen. The old NGC insert did not specify the type, and the holder in which it was then housed may have obscured the true type of rim.]; probably [as noted above, the microscopic specks above the eagle's wing are present] H. Jeff Browning Collection ("The Dallas Bank Collection"), Sotheby's/Stack's, October 29-30, 2001, lot 151, "Wire Rim...Superb Gem Satin Finish Proof. Spectacular." ($115,000); most of the Browning Double Eagles were acquired privately (via a group of dealers including Mike Brownlee) as a single purchase of the R.E. ("Ted") Naftzger Collection in the early 1970s. Naftzger assembled much of his collection in the 1940s and 1950s via Abe Kosoff, and it is entirely possible that this amazing superb gem comes from this source. Note: The history of the Saint-Gaudens gold coin designs has been published in various forms for years, and in the last decade or so more information than ever has been made public. President Theodore Roosevelt intensely disliked the look of the 19th century coin designs and pressured a dying Augustus Saint-Gaudens to take the commission in 1905. The intent was to develop coins struck in high relief to emulate the coins of ancient Greece. Saint-Gaudens, mortally ill, designed the coins and left the modeling to his assistant Henry Hering. Throughout the Mint's Chief Engraver Charles Barber fought the President and his chosen artist every step of the way. But in the end a handful of patterns with exceptionally high relief were struck. Although they delighted the President they were useless for commercial use. Following Saint-Gaudens' death in August 1907 the President ordered an extensive run of examples with slightly reduced relief be struck for general circulation; both to show what could be achieved and probably to honor the dead artist. With approximately 12,000 produced, examples of the 'regular' high relief double eagle are probably the most popular of all collectible American coin designs, and is widely acclaimed as America's most beautiful. The archival record regarding the production of Proofs of this design is scant. However, according to Breen, Charles Barber confirmed their production, and approximately seven examples were contained in his estate. While the pedigrees of these have become hopelessly muddled over the years, the extraordinary quality of this example may point to it having been one of those saved by Barber.

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  • 2013-09-24
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1964 AC COBRA 289 MKII

1964 AC COBRA 289 MKII Premier numéro de châssis export Châssis n° COX 6001 Moteur Ford V8 avant 4 727 cm3 Carburateur quadruple corps Puissance 275 ch à 5 800 tr/min À la fin des années 1950, le Texan Carroll Shelby (à ses heures éleveur de poulets) s'était fait remarquer en Amérique comme en Europe par ses talents de pilote au volant de Ferrari et surtout, en remportant les 24 Heures du Mans 1959 sur Aston Martin. Son patriotisme lui faisait regretter l'absence d'une véritable voiture de sport américaine capable de battre les GT de compétition européennes. Il allait donc la fabriquer dans l'esprit " dragster " local en montant - vieille recette de base - un gros moteur dans un châssis plus rigoureusement conçu afin de produire une voiture performante, homologable pour la route et pour la compétition, mais sans recourir à une mécanique exotique. En quête d'un châssis rigide, léger et doté d'un comportement dynamique de haut niveau qu'il équiperait d'un moteur américain peu coûteux, mais puissant, efficace et fiable, il choisit le châssis britannique AC à quatre roues indépendantes et le nouveau bloc V8 Ford de la Fairlane relativement peu encombrant. Le projet se concrétisa au moment où le motoriste Bristol allait arrêter la fabrication du six-cylindres deux litres (issu du moteur BMW 328) aux limites de son développement qui équipait les AC Ace et Aceca. L'usine AC accepta volontiers de fournir à Shelby des ensembles châssis-carrosserie que les Américains équiperaient chez eux du moteur Ford préparé et d'une solide boîte Borg-Warner manuelle à quatre rapports synchronisés. Malgré la cylindrée " limitée " à 4,2 litres, la Cobra 260, la première de la famille, dépassa aisément 240 km/h et accéléra de 0 à 100 km/h en moins de 6 secondes (selon les rapports de transmission). L'excellence des performances encouragea aussitôt la course à l'armement et Shelby monta le nouveau bloc Ford 4,7 litres dès qu'il fut disponible, malgré une tenue de route à la limite en raison du rapport poids-puissance-couple déjà très favorable et d'un châssis très sollicité en torsion sous l'effet du couple énorme pour lequel il n'avait pas été calculé à l'origine. Mais il fallut conserver les ressorts à lames transversaux et améliorer la précision de la direction en adoptant une crémaillère. Sous cette forme, la Mk II (ainsi désignée a posteriori) séduisit les amateurs de sensations fortes (plus de 300 ch à la tonne !) et fit carrière dans les compétitions américaines. Elle courut aussi en Europe où, confiée à des pilotes au gros cœur (voir Jo Schlesser au Tour de Corse 1963), elle essaya de tenir tête aux meilleures GT sur les routes du Vieux Monde malgré un châssis désormais dépassé. La Mk II fut la Cobra la plus produite avec plus de 500 exemplaires fabriqués de 1963 à 1968 et surtout la plus utilisable sur route avant l'apparition de la monstrueuse " 7 litres ", la redoutable 427 dont le châssis, les suspensions, les freins, les roues et les pneus et la caisse avaient été retouchés, sinon profondément modifiés en fonction du couple énorme et des 400, voire 480 ch du moteur Ford (qui équipa aussi les célèbres GT40 Mk II et Mk IV). Quoi qu'il en soit, les Cobra 289 et 427 sont devenues des voitures mythiques que leur rareté rend encore plus désirables au point de susciter depuis bientôt quarante ans l'apparition d'innombrables copies ou d'imitations plus ou moins proches du type original, qui reste la référence absolue en la matière. Quelle auto efficace que cette Cobra livrée neuve en France à Chardonnet et exposée au Salon de Paris la même année. Il s'agit du premier numéro de châssis export. Son premier propriétaire est M. Leman. 15 ans après, elle est restaurée en Angleterre par Brian Angliss, avant de devenir la propriété de Bernard Afchain. Celui-ci la vend à M. Leiguel qui en profite quelque années et revient dans les mains de M. Afchain. Il la confie en décembre 1992 à l'Etude Poulain-Le Fur qui la vend au propriétaire actuel. Le mécanicien Franck Opderbeck l'adapte au sans plomb, change les étriers, les pneus, les trois joints spi de pont et la fait rouler de manière très régulière. Il s'agit d'une voiture très saine, dotée de performances impressionnantes, dont l'intérieur en cuir beige est d'origine, présentant une superbe patine et un parfum authentique. Une voiture rare dans cette configuration originale, une force de la nature parfaite pour tous rallyes. Carte grise française first chassis export number Ford 4727cc V8 front-engine (275bhp at 5800rpm) In the late 1950s a Texan chicken-breeder called Carroll Shelby made his mark on either side of the Atlantic - due to his talent as a driver at the wheel of a Ferrari and, above all, by winning the 1959 Le Mans 24 Hours in an Aston Martin. But he felt patriotic regret at the absence of a veritable American sports car able to beat European racing GTs. So, in local 'dragster' spirit, he made one himself, adopting the age-old recipe of mounting a large engine in a more rigorously designed chassis to produce a high-performance car that could be certified for both road-use and competition, without having recourse to sophisticated mechanics. After searching for a light, rigid, dynamic-performance chassis to equip with an inexpensive yet powerful, efficient and reliable American engine, Shelby chose a British AC chassis and Fairlane's new, relatively unwieldy Ford V8 engine. The project took shape just when Bristol were about to stop making this six-cylinder, 2-litre engine (derived from the BMW 328) used for the AC Ace and Aceca. The AC factory readily accepted to supply Shelby with chassis-bodywork ensembles to be fitted in the USA with the Ford engine and a solid Borg-Warner manual four-speed gearbox. Despite a capacity of 'just' 4.2 litres, the Cobra 260 - the first in the series - easily topped 150mph, with 0-60mph acceleration in under 6 seconds. These excellent performances swiftly encouraged an 'arms race', with Shelby mounting the new Ford 4.7-litre engine as soon as it was available - despite its erratic road-holding due to an already favourable weight-power-torque ratio, and a chassis that bore the strain of a tremendous torque for which it had not been originally designed; a steering rack was installed to improve precision. It was in this form that the Mark II (as it was later known) thrilled drivers and spectators (over 300bhp per tonne!) during its racing career Stateside. It also competed in Europe, with big-hearted drivers (like Jo Schlesser in the 1963 Tour de Corse) attempting to match the best GTs on the road, despite its already outdated chassis. The Mark II was the most extensively produced of the Cobras, with more than 500 cars made from 1963-68. It was above all the most road-friendly, prior to the monstrous '7-litre' - the redoubtable 427 whose chassis, suspension, brakes, wheels and tires had been modified, if not profoundly altered, to take into account the enormous torque and the 400bhp (sometimes even 480bhp) produced by the Ford engine (which also equipped the celebrated GT40 Mark II and Mark IV). Be that as it may, the Cobra 289 and Cobra 427 became mythical cars, all the more desirable because of their rarity. Over the last forty years they have prompted countless more-or-less successful copies or imitations of the original, which remains the supreme reference. This superbly efficient Cobra, with the first chassis export number, was delivered new to Chardonnet in France, and shown at the Paris Motor Show the same year. Its first owner was Mr Leman. It was subsequently with Mr Afchain, who had it fully restored in his workshops. It must have had another owner in the meantime. Mr Afchain consigned it for auction with Poulain-Le Fur in December 1992, when it was bought by its current owner. The mechanic Franck Opderbeck has adapted it for unleaded petrol and changed the tires, calliper and the axle's three oil seals, and had it driven regularly. This car has posted some impressive performances and is in excellent condition, with its original beige leather interior with superb patina and authentic aroma. It is rare to find a car in this original configuration - a force of nature perfect for any rally. French registration "carte grise" Estimation 340 000 - 380 000 € Sold for 423,222 €

  • FRAFrance
  • 2010-07-09
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1870 $20 Ultra Cameo PF-67 NGC

1870 $20 Ultra Cameo PF-67 NGC James B. Longacre, Designer Obverse: Head of Liberty facing left, wearing a bejeweled coronet on which LIBERTY is emblazoned; around, thirteen stars; below, 1870. Reverse: Heraldic eagle, head facing left, with spread wings and shield emblazoned on its chest holding olive branch and three arrows in its talons; above, the motto, IN GOD WE TRUST within an oval of thirteen stars amidst rays of Glory; around, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA; below, TWENTY D. Condition: NGC Proof 67 Ultra Cameo (Certificate number: 1963253-014 – Photo Proof 10-07; previous Photo Proof 01-07 [number 1560799-001]). A superb coin with incredible, deeply mirrored fields, rich orange-peel effect and intense and nearly perfect cameo devices. Fresh dies, a faint pair of mint-caused specks that flank the lowest point of the ninth star serve to identify this example, as does a tiny inclusion through the arrowheads. The apparent planchet flake at 10 o'clock on the reverse, breaks in the frost on some of the reverse lettering, and the 'dimple' on Liberty's cheek are characteristics apparently shared by all specimens. References: This Coin Published: Breen (Proofs) p. 140, 5; Akers (1982) p. 93; Garrett & Guth (Encyclopedia) p. 498; this coin used to illustrate the date on the NGC Coin Explorer website. Other references: Breen (Encyclopedia) 7234; Bowers (Guide Book of Double Eagles) p. 130, (PCGS 99085). Condition Census: The finest known, NGC lists no other examples this perfectly preserved; PCGS lists none this fine (Proof 65 cameo the finest). In fact, an examination of the combined population reports of both services reveals that this coin is tied with only one other as the finest known specimen of the entire design type. A splendid coin with a fantastic pedigree. (07-13) Rarity: Exceptionally rare, thirty-five proofs are recorded as having been made. Breen (Proofs) was only able to trace the whereabouts of eight examples, more accurately seven, as he noted two coins that were probably identical; he later refined this figure to 10 to 12; Akers (1982) estimated that "no more than 10 proofs still exist" (a figure which falls midway in Bowers assessment [A Guidebook of Double Eagle Gold Coins]); Garrett and Guth, in their Encyclopedia note an example in the American Numismatic Society (ex J.P. Morgan and Brock Collections), two in the Smithsonian (neither of which is nearly as fine as this example), and estimate less than ten examples in private hands (with the population reports swollen by re-submissions). However, the recent 2011 auction of probably the second finest known example (NGC Ultra Cameo Proof 65 CAC), noted that only 4 to 5 examples were confirmed in private hands and cited (as number 1 in their census) the presently offered example as the finest known. Following its most recent (2007) auction appearance, the presently offered coin, according to the Red Book (2009 ed.), ranked among the 250 most valuable U.S. coins ever sold, and among the ten most valuable 19th century double eagles ever sold [including examples of the 1861 Paquet, 1854-O, 1856-O and 1870-CC]. Provenance: The Orlando Sale, January 2, 2007, lot 1410, Proof-66 PCGS, "Magnificent ... stunning ... superlative condition" ($368,000); Ed Trompeter Collection; Louis E. Eliasberg Collection ("The United States Gold Coin Collection"), Bowers and Ruddy, October 27-29, 1982, lot 924, Proof-65 ($28,600); "Believed to be from the John H. Clapp Collection, 1942 [via Stack's]. Earlier from the Richard Collection (New York Coin and Stamp Co., June 1899.)" Note: In 1866 the double eagle saw its first change in design since being issued in 1850 with the addition of the motto, IN GOD WE TRUST to the reverse in the ellipse of stars above the eagle's head. Eleven years later the design was changed once again, but during this post-Civil War period demand for proof gold was minimal. Mint records indicate that a paltry 335 proof double eagles were struck of the entire design type (fewer even than the initial eight years of proof coinage of the No Motto variety).

  • USAUSA
  • 2013-09-24
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A cased and factory engraved pair of Colt Model 1861 Navy percussion presentation revolvers Maj. Gen. Jas. B. McPherson, 17th Army Corps From his Frie

A cased and factory engraved pair of Colt Model 1861 Navy percussion presentation revolvers Maj. Gen. Jas. B. McPherson, 17th Army Corps From his Friends O.N. Cutler. W.C. Wagley Serial no. 11756 I and 11757 I for 1863, .36 caliber. The blued 7 1/2 inch barrels finely engraved with floral scrollwork on a beaded ground, probably by Georg H. Sterzing, on No. 11756 incorporating an eagle's head above the barrel wedge and a dog's head forward of that, the reverse with a dog's head above the wedge and an eagle's head in front; No. 11757 with an eagle's head above the wedge on either side. Casehardened loading levers, the lugs scroll-engraved. Hand engraved cylinders, the leading edges with dentate borders above the legend Engaged 16 May 1843; the rear third of each, scroll engraved. Casehardened and scroll-engraved frames, the left side of No. 11756 incorporating an eagle's head, the left side of No. 11757, a human face. Plain, fire-blued screws. Casehardened hammers engraved with scrollwork below a wolf's head. Silver-plated triggerguards/gripstraps with scroll-engraved panels, the backstraps inscribed From his Friends/O.N. Cutler. W.C. Wagley. Triggerguards marked on both sides 36 Cal. Ivory grips, the left sides inscribed Maj. Gen. Jas. B. McPherson, 17th Army Corps. Complete with original walnut case, the lid with brass escutcheon inscribed Maj. Genl. Jas. B. McPherson. French style interior lined in burgundy velour. Accessories include a James Dixon & Sons bag-shaped powder flask, two blued steel two-cavity Colt's Patent bullet molds, two L-shaped combination tools and two unopened tins of Eley Brothers percussion caps. Together with a framed vignette featuring a clipped autograph, an image of the General and a short holographic note in the generals hand, datedApr 11/64 from General McPherson to a lady in Brooklyn thanking her. Also included are two carte-de-visites of the General and a file of information and provenance. Condition: Excellent and probably unfired. Retaining virtually all the dark blued finish, the barrels showing some very minor spotting. Loading levers retain nearly all the casehardening with some wear to the tampers. Frames also retain most of the casehardening with a small area of fading to the left rear section on each gun. Triggerguards/gripstraps also retain nearly all their finish, each gun showing a small area bare of finish where Mr. Cutler's name is inscribed on the backstrap. Excellent grips. Lid with scattered marks and repaired crack. Lining showing wear and fading. Accessories excellent. See Illustration

  • USAUSA
  • 2014-11-11
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1845 $10 Cameo PF-65 NGC

1845 $10 Cameo PF-65 NGC Christian Gobrecht, designer and engraver Obverse: Head of Liberty facing left, her hair in an elaborate chignon, wearing a coronet on which LIBERTY is emblazoned; around, thirteen stars; below, 1845. Reverse: Displayed eagle, head facing left, with shield emblazoned on its chest holding olive branch and three arrows in its talons; around, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA; below, TEN D. Condition: NGC Proof 65 Cameo (Certificate number: 1963267-003 – Photo Proof 10-07; previous Photo Proof 07-05 [number 1727697-003] ). Exceptionally deep orange-gold; a superbly struck example with only a few faint hairlines on the chin of Liberty and a couple of minor mint-made lint marks (one above the head of Liberty, another above the E in TEN) noticeable to aid in pedigree determination. A magnificent coin. References: This Coin Published: Breen (Encyclopedia) 6866, 2; Breen (Proofs) p. 81, 2-3; Garrett & Guth (Encyclopedia) p. 397; Akers (1980) p. 39; this piece used to illustrate the NGC Coin Explorer website. (PCGS 88781) Condition Census: The finest known. The only example certified by NGC. PCGS lists four examples (none finer than Proof 64), but since only three are known in private hands (the fourth is in the Smithsonian) the PCGS census obviously represents multiple re-submissions. Regarding the presently offered coin, Akers, who had handled the other two other known specimens in private hands, unequivocally stated in his catalogue of the John J. Pittman Collection (Part Two, 1998, lot 1711) that: "this piece is decidedly superior to either of those two examples." He called it "even slightly finer" than Pittman's 1848 Proof Eagle which appeared in the same sale and brought a stunning price ($176,000). (07-13) Rarity: Of the greatest rarity. Walter Breen (Proofs) cited three examples, but, as above, counted the Col. Green and Pittman examples as two separate coins when they are the same; in his Encyclopedia (1987) he corrected this error, but added the Garrett Collection example and the example from the set discovered in England circa 1979. Akers (1980) reckoned on a survival rate of five to six specimens although in 1998, in his catalogue of the Pittman collection, he was still only able to account for four examples. Akers could cite only two auction appearances between 1948 and 1979 and since then the only auction records for an 1845 Eagle are the Garrett specimen (twice, first in 1980 and then in 1999) and the Pittman example (this coin) in 1998 as part of a proof set. Garrett and Guth estimate a mintage of four. Provenance: John Jay Pittman, Part Two, David Akers Numismatics, Inc., May 20-21, 1998, lot 1711 (part of a complete 10 piece set) ($756,250); "A Memorable Collection" [Jacob Shapiro/J.F. Bell], Numismatic Galleries [Abe Kosoff and Abner Kreisberg], March 1-2, 1948, lot 548 ($210); Colonel Edward Howland Robinson Green, Stack's (via private placement), circa December 31, 1943/January 10, 1944; possibly ex Burdette G. Johnson (circa 1931), Waldo G. Newcomer (circa 1911), William H. Woodin, Lorin G. Parmelee. Note: John Jay Pittman purchased his three 1845 gold proofs from the sale of the "Memorable Collection" as separate lots. The collector who assembled the presently-offered Tacasyl collection managed to locate a finer half eagle than the Memorable-Pittman coin, and therefore the three lots in the present sale (1003, 1013, 1017) comprise the finest 1845 gold proof set obtainable. Like the half eagle, proof issues of the No Motto, coronet type struck from the inception of the design (for eagles it is 1839) until the beginning of production of proofs for public sale in 1858 are of the utmost rarity. Garrett & Guth have estimated not more than thirty examples exist for all dates, which, for a nearly twenty year period is notable, especially as the number of examples in private hands is only about twenty (the Smithsonian has nine proof eagles from this period, and an additional two are in the collection of the American Numismatic Society). Of those in private hands of all dates, and graded by either PCGS or NGC, only one coin is of equivalent quality to this piece, and one exceeds it by a point. As noted for the half eagle these proof sets could have been produced to commemorate the entry of either Florida or Texas to the Union, or President Polk's inauguration.

  • USAUSA
  • 2013-09-24
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WATSON, James D. The Nobel Prize “Banquet” Speech . Manuscript draft notes for the Nobel Prize Acceptance Speech. 5 pages on four leaves, small 8vo (1

WATSON, James D. The Nobel Prize “Banquet” Speech . Manuscript draft notes for the Nobel Prize Acceptance Speech. 5 pages on four leaves, small 8vo (170 x 135 mm), in blue ink on Grand Hotel Stockholm stationery. Stockholm, December 9,1962. “As soon as dessert was finished, John Steinbeck went to the grand podium overlooking the hall to deliver his Nobel address. In it he emphasized man’s capacity for greatness of heart and spirit in the endless war against weakness and despair. The Cold War and the existence of nuclear weapons silently lurked behind his message of the writer confronting the human dilemma. He saw humans taking over divine prerogatives: ‘Having taken god-like powers, we must seek in ourselves for the responsibility and the wisdom we once prayed some deity might have.’ Ending his oration, he paraphrased St. John the Evangelist: ‘In the end is the Word, and the Word is man, and the Word is with men.’ I became increasingly nervous and could not listen attentively, since in just a few minutes I was to be up on the podium to offer the response of the laureates in physiology or medicine. I hoped my extemporizing would rise above platitudes. Only after I was back at my seat did I relax, knowing that I had spoken from the heart. I was pleased at my last sentences, in which I had aimed for the cadence of one of JFK’s better speeches. Graciously Francis then passed across the table his place card with a note on the back: ‘Much better than I could have done. - F’ [included in this lot]. I could enjoy John Kendrew expressing his joy at being part of a group of five men who had worked and talked together for the past fifteen years and could now come together to Stockholm on the same happy occasion. Then the party moved to the floor below for dancing, most of it done by the white ties and gowns of the Karolinska medical students.” —James D. Watson, The Annotated and Illustrated Double Helix, edited by Alexander Gann and Jan Witkowski, Cold Spring Harbor, 2012, pp. 252-54. [With:] Three typed transcripts from the audio recording of the Speech, each with Watson’s holograph annotations, which were incorporated into the final published version; and one clean carbon of the Speech. Each 1 ½ pp. [And:] Original typed place card of Francis Crick from the Stockholm Dinner (35 x 109 mm), INSCRIBED BY FRANCIS CRICK on verso upon hearing (and presented to Watson immediately after the Speech) “much better than I could have done / F.” This archive comprises Watson’s original manuscript notes in ink on Grand Hotel Stockholm stationery, written after he had arrived in Stockholm to receive the Nobel Prize in December 1962. The corrected typed transcripts were made following the lecture from the audio recording of Watson’s Speech as it was extemporaneously delivered when he accepted the honor on behalf of his colleagues (see N. Comfort’s introductory essay, pp. 14-15 in this catalogue). As James Watson’s papers are in the Archives at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory ANY IMPORTANT MANUSCRIPT MATERIAL BY THE CO-DISCOVERER OF THE STRUCTURE OF DNA IS EXCEEDINGLY SCARCE IN THE MARKET.

  • USAUSA
  • 2014-12-04
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1836 $2.5 Ultra Cameo PF-66 NGC

1836 (Head of 1835) $2.5 Ultra Cameo PF-66★ NGC William Kneass, designer (after John Reich) Obverse: Head of Liberty facing left, her hair bound in a fillet on which LIBERTY is inscribed, her hair curled and falling to the base of her neck; around, thirteen stars; below, 1836. Reverse: Heraldic eagle, head facing left, with shield emblazoned on its chest holding olive branch and three arrows in its talons; around, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA; below, 2½ D. Condition: NGC Proof 66★ Ultra Cameo (Certificate number: 1963262-001 – Photo Proof 10-07; previous Photo Proof 07-06 [number 406767-001]). An astonishing coin. A wonderful deep reddish gold. Typically for the issue there is slight weakness at the center of the obverse but fully struck elsewhere (the stars and their centers are razor sharp). Deep reflective fields contrast brilliantly with the well-frosted cameo devices; there are a few Mint-made die striae, a reverse lint mark in the field below OF,and planchet fleck above the A of STATES that act as identifiers. For the other coin from this set,the Half Eagle of 1836, see lot 1012. References: This Coin Published: Garrett & Guth (Encyclopedia) p. 114; this example used to illustrate the 1836 type on the NGC Coin Explorer website. Other references: Breen (Encyclopedia) 6143; Breen (Proofs) p. 65 (Breen B3); Akers (1975) pp. 34-35. (PCGS 388943) Condition Census: The finest known. According to NGC this is the only coin graded Proof 66★ Ultra Cameo, and none finer; PCGS records no specimens at this grade (Proof 65 Cameo, finest.) (07-13) Rarity: A phenomenal rarity. Not only for being the finest known example of the date, but as a proof of this design in any grade. For a number of years there was an error on the NGC website, which listed two examples of the 1836 head of 1835 in Proof 66★ Ultra Cameo. However, during cataloguing a check of this coin's two Photo Proof numbers revealed that the earlier certificate had not been deleted when this coin was re-holdered. NGC has since corrected the error, thus confirming this coin's status as the single finest known example. Akers (who agreed with Breen) thought three or four examples extant prior to his Pittman catalogue, where he added an example to his census; since then an additional example has been recorded. The list of known examples in addition to this coin (assembled from the Pittman and Heritage 2012 catalogues) includes the Smithsonian (National Coin Collection) example (Head of 1837); John J. Pittman, Part 2, May 20-21, 1998, lot 1720 (Small head of 1834); Harry Bass Collection, Part 3, May 25-26, 2000, lot 92 (Head of 1837); Dr. Robert Loewinger Collection (Heritage [January 2007], lot 3104 (Small head of 1834); Stack's 55th Anniversary sale (October, 1990), lot 1674 (incorrectly attributed as Head of 1835); Bowers and Merena Rarities sale (July, 2002), lot 577 (Head of 1835). It should be noted that although a half dozen examples are known of the date, three separate varieties have been identified, and of each variety, apparently only two examples have been attributed (although the Stack's 55th Anniversary coin is misidentified). Provenance: The Rarities Sale, Bowers and Merena Galleries, July 31, 2000, lot 580 (part); prior to August 2000, the complete 8-piece set was sold to a private collector for a reported $1,000,000 (according to PCGS Coin Facts website); Brian Hendelson; Anonymous Philadelphia family (as part of a complete 1836 proof set, owned since the date of issue). Note: For the quarter eagle, the Classic head design had a very short life-span from 1834 to 1839. The design replaced William Kneass's own capped head which was itself a technical improvement on John Reich's yet earlier design of the same type. In this case Kneass, a mechanical wizard, looked back to the designs of Reich's large cents of 1808-1814 and their Empire style for inspiration. Breen's suggestion that it was for uniformity of design fails by a simple comparison with the other denominations then in circulation. The reverse design saw the elimination of the motto E PLURIBUS UNUM, which, according to Breen, was to enable instant identification with the earlier 'old tenor' coins which were heavier and had a higher gold content. Ultimately the motto did not find its way back onto quarter eagles until 1908 and Bela Lyon Pratt's issues. With so many dies being prepared it is small wonder that despite the extraordinarily small number of proofs struck three separate varieties have been identified. During this period virtually all proofs were produced 'to order' (such as the renowned 1834 proof sets [which included 1804-dated proof specimens of the silver dollar and eagle] for diplomatic presentation), and since the proofs were struck from polished business strike dies, it is possible that the duplication of three different varieties of the 1836 quarter eagle proofs, represents three individual orders.

  • USAUSA
  • 2013-09-24
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The First of June 1794 Naval Large Gold Medal and Archive to Admiral Lord Graves, Royal Navy,

The First of June 1794 Naval Large Gold Medal and Archive to Admiral Lord Graves, Royal Navy, The Archive comprises of The Large Naval Gold Medal. The obverse with Britannia, a spear in her left hand and a shield below, standing on the deck of an antique galley, her right foot resting on a helmet, crowned with a wreath by a winged victory. The reverse with inscription within a wreath of oak (right) and laurel (left), engraved (Thomas Graves Esquire Admiral and Second in Command on the 1 of June MDCCXCIV. The French Fleet Defeated). The medal with gold chain and neck riband. A Lloyds presentation trophy in the form of a twin handled silver-gilt cup and cover. The cover with pinecone finial held in acanthus leaves above cascading stiff leaves separated by bell husks, with small engraved crest and rope twist band, the outer edge engraved (Green & Ward Fect Ludgate Hill London. The cup with rope twist handles and Neptune mask junctions with foliate scroll border with two central oval panels one with engraved coat of arms, the other engraved with the following inscription (Lloyds Coffee House. A Tribute of Respect from his Country to ADMIRAL LORD GRAVES, for his gallant Conduct in His MAJESTY'S SHIP The Royal Sovereign on the ever memorable 1st of JUNE 1794. when the French Fleet was defeated by the British Fleet under the Command OF ADMIRAL EARL HOWE. John Julius Angerstein Chairman.). Both oval panels edged with naval weapons and accessories, on top of a guilloche knop, spreading foot and rope twist and stiff leaf band. Maximum height with cover 51.5cm and maximum width 35cm, weighing 148oz, with hallmark for Robert Sharp. A collection of seven hardbound handwritten logs/letter books which represent a comprehensive record of correspondence sent and received by him during his time in the Royal Navy. The major details transcripted in the footnote below. The medal remains in extremely fine condition the outer band having moved over time from the centre, the silver-gilt trophy has the majority of the original gilding still remaining, the logs have been preserved remarkably well and virtually all writing remains readble. (Lot)

  • GBRGrande Bretagne
  • 2016-03-23
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GEORGE MAWBY INGRAM - VICTORIA CROSS MEDAL - 1918 -incl citation and other medals from collection

GEORGE MAWBY INGRAM - VICTORIA CROSS MEDAL - 1918 -incl citation and other medals from collection, GEORGE MAWBY INGRAM - VICTORIA CROSS MEDAL - 1918 -incl citation and other medals from collection An Important Australian Victoria Cross Group from the First World War Awarded to Lieutenant George Morby Ingram, 24th Battalion A.I.F., Western Front, France, 1918 a.      Victoria Cross - (London Gazette, 6th January, 1919, p 306) B.     Military Medal - (London Gazette, 11th May, 1917, p 4601) C.      British War Medal - 1914 – 1918 D.     Service Medal 1914 – 1919 E.      War Medal 1939 - 1945 F.       Australia Service Medal 1939 – 1945 G.      1937 - Coronation Medal H.      1952 - Coronation Medal Victoria Cross Citation: "For most conspicuous bravery and initiative during the attack on Montbrehain, east of Peronne, on 5th October, 1918. When early in the advance his Platoon was held up by a strong point, Lieutenant INGRAM, without hesitation, dashed out and rushed the post at the head of his men, capturing nine machine guns and killing forty-two enemy after stubborn resistance. Later when the Company had suffered severe casualties from the enemy posts, and many leaders had fallen, he at once took control of the situation, rallied his men under intense fire, and led them forward. He himself rushed the first post, shot six of the enemy and captured a machine gun, thus overcoming serious resistance. On two subsequent occasions he again displayed great dash and resource in the capture of enemy posts, inflicting many casualties and taking sixty-two prisoners. Throughout the whole day he showed a most inspiring example of courage and leadership and freely exposed himself regardless of danger." The objective at the battle of Montbrehain was to take the Beaurevoir line and the heavily fortified town of Montbrehain. The Beaurevoir line was taken before 3:00pm on October 3rd, 1918. Two days later on October 5th at 6:50am Major General Rosenthal, with the help of tanks, started his assault on the town of Montbrehain. "A" Company of the 24th Battalion had the right flank, "D" Company had the left flank and "B" Company had the front on assault. "B" Company, which was led by Lieutenant George Ingram, was held up early in the battle by a strong point. When they finally broke through, Ingram led the way as mentioned in the above citation, killing 42 of the enemy and capturing 9 machine guns. Ingram also burst through a cellar door and single handedly captured a garrison of 30 men. By half way through the battle the casualties of the 24th Battalion were so great that they had to borrow men from the 27th Battalion. Finally at 8:00pm, 14 hours after the fighting started, the final objective was taken and Montbrehain fell to the might of the AIF. For his actions Lieutenant George Ingram won the Victoria Cross. This was the last Victoria Cross awarded during the war to the Australians and Montbrehain was the last battle the AIF was involved in during World War I. INGRAM, GEORGE MAWBY (MORBY) (1889-1961), soldier and carpenter, was born on 18th March 1889 at Bagshot near Sandhurst (Bendigo), Victoria, son of George Ronald Ingram, farmer, and his wife Charlotte, née Hubbard, both Victorian-born. Educated at Lilydale State School, he was apprenticed as a carpenter and joiner. He later went to Caulfield, Melbourne, and worked as a carpenter until 1914. On 19th January 1910, at East Prahran, he had married Jane Francis Nichols with Congregational forms. There were no children of the marriage which was dissolved in 1926 with Ingram as petitioner, the grounds being desertion by his wife. In 1905-14 Ingram was a member of the militia forces and was attached to the Australian Garrison Artillery. On 10th December 1914 he enlisted as a Private with the 3rd Battalion, Australian Naval and Military Expeditionary Force, and served in New Guinea until his discharge on 19th January 1916; he immediately enlisted in the Australian Imperial Force and was allotted to the 16th Reinforcements to the 24th Battalion. In January 1917 he joined his unit in France. Within the next nine months he received promotions from Corporal to Company Sergeant Major and was awarded the Military Medal for 'great courage and initiative as a member of a bombing section' at Grevillers, near Bapaume, in March. He was in hospital from April until June and again during September and October, after which he rejoined his Battalion. On 20th June 1918 he was appointed Second Lieutenant but three days later he was evacuated with illness, resuming duty on 12th July. He was promoted Lieutenant on 24th October. A tall man of robust physique and quiet, unassuming character, Ingram paid tribute to the bravery of the men in his Company during the advance. In April 1919 he returned to Melbourne and on his discharge became General Foreman with E. A. and Frank Watts Pty Ltd, building contractors. He married a widow, Lillian Wakeling, née Hart, on 10th February 1927 at the Methodist parsonage, Malvern, giving his occupation as farmer. After the completion of Melbourne's Shrine of Remembrance, he became a guard there. During World War II he served with the Royal Australian Engineers and attained the rank of Captain. Ingram's second wife died in May 1951 and on 24th December he married another widow, Myrtle Lydia Thomas, née Cornell, at Brunswick Methodist Church. Survived by his wife and their son, and a son from his second marriage, he died of coronary vascular disease at his home at Hastings on 30th June 1961 and was buried in Frankston cemetery. Select Bibliography W. J. Harvey, The Red and White Diamond (Melb, 1920); C. E. W. Bean, The A.I.F. in France, 1918 (Syd, 1942); L. Wigmore (ed), They Dared Mightily (Canb, 1963); London Gazette, 11 May 1917, 6 Jan 1919; Mufti, Nov 1937; war diary, 24th Battalion, AIF (Australian War Memorial). More on the resources Author: Darryl McIntyre Print Publication Details: Darryl McIntyre, 'Ingram, George Mawby (1889 - 1961)', Australian Dictionary of Biography, Volume 9, Melbourne University Press, 1983, pp 431-432

  • AUSAustralie
  • 2008-05-27
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1855 $1 Type 2 Ultra Cameo PF-66â605 NGC

1855 $1 Type 2 Ultra Cameo PF-66★ NGC James B. Longacre, designer Obverse: Small head of Liberty facing left, wearing an Indian headdress with LIBERTY inscribed on the band; around, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA. Reverse: 1 / DOLLAR / 1855, in three lines within wreath composed of agricultural elements bound with a bow. Condition: NGC Proof 66★ Ultra Cameo (Certificate number 1963253-001 – Photo Proof 10-07) A superb example with the finest details sharply struck. Rich frosted cameo effect highlighting the deeply mirrored field. Full, rich color, with only a few minuscule lint marks (as made, these are not defects), those most noticeable,one behind Liberty's head, and one below the truncation serve to identify this example. As noted by Q. David Bowers in the Eliasberg catalogue: "Lint marks are often seen among pre-1858 Proofs." An exceptional coin. References: This Coin Published: Breen (Encyclopedia) 6040; Garrett & Guth (Encyclopedia) p. 30; Garrett & Dannreuther, Significant Auction Records 1990-1999, this piece illustrated on the cover; this piece used to illustrate the type on the NGC Coin Explorer website. Other references: Breen (Proofs) p. 99; Akers (1975) pp. 37-38; Garrett & Guth (100 Greatest U.S. Coins). (PCGS 97602) Condition Census: Tied for finest known, with, according to NGC, only one other example graded Proof 66★ Ultra Cameo, none finer; PCGS records a single example at this grade (but lacking cameo or deep cameo designations).(07-13) Rarity: As a proof, both extremely rare as a date, and exceptionally rare as a design type. This date is lacking in the National Coin Collection in the Smithsonian where the type is represented, according to Garrett & Guth (Encyclopedia of U.S. Gold Coins) by a "harshly cleaned" 1854. Walter Breen (Proofs) postulated a population of between six and ten examples; he identified six specific examples (but the one he noted as being in the Garrett collection was an error). Akers, in the John J. Pittman catalogue (Part One, lot 866), listed eight examples (including, in error, the Smithsonian) with the possibility of a ninth, and the two major grading services agree with this figure. In addition to the Pittman coin, one is the American Numismatic Society; other examples include those formerly in the Norman Stack, Floyd Starr, and Harold Bareford collections, as well as this example, formerly in the Clapp, Eliasberg, and Trompeter collections. The Type 2 design was struck in 1854-1856 yet only a dozen or so proofs exist for the entire series, three of which are in museum collections. Nothing even close to the quality of this Gem has appeared at auction for half a decade. Provenance: Ed Trompeter, Superior Galleries, February 25, 1992, lot 1, Gem Brilliant Proof, "... resplendent, spotless .... On the envelope in which this Trompeter coin came was the notation 'Probably the finest of 7 known'." ($148,500); Jay Miller; Louis E. Eliasberg, Bowers and Ruddy Galleries, October 27-29, 1982 lot 26, Gem Brilliant Proof-67, "A superb, magnificent example .... a legendary piece which will be forever remembered in the annals of the series.... [its] condition sets it apart from nearly all, if not completely all of its rare companions." ($62,700); John H. Clapp Collection, 1942 (via Stack's); Elmer S. Sears, April 1909. Note: Authorized by the Coinage Act of March 3, 1849, the gold dollar, like the double eagle, was created as a result of the vast discoveries of gold in California. Although the concept for a gold dollar coin reaches back to Alexander Hamilton's original blueprint for our nation's monetary system in 1791, it wasn't until the mid-nineteenth century that it saw the light of day. Congress forced the Mint to design and strike the denomination despite lengthy resistance from Mint Director Robert Patterson (a series of pattern gold dollars was produced in 1836). In 1849, the Mint's Chief Engraver, James B. Longacre was entrusted with designing the new denomination, whose obverse head of Liberty was enlarged and later used for the obverse of the double eagle through 1907. In the end the original design was doomed to failure, primarily because of its size (13mm) which was deemed too small for convenience. 1853 saw a change of leadership and the new Mint director, James Snowden, oversaw the change of design of the gold dollar, which he felt was too small and thick. Longacre was again entrusted with the new design (which this time resembled the newly invented denomination, the three dollar gold piece). Liberty was no longer seen as a neo-classical effigy, but an Indian princess wearing a feathered headdress in the style of 17th century Virginia. The planchet was thinned and spread to 15mm, which, with slightly higher relief cut for the head of Liberty, created technical difficulties in manufacture. The metal would not flow as intended and as a result there was an inability to properly strike up the designs, leaving the central details soft and unsatisfactory. These flaws were corrected by yet another, this time successful, redesign in 1856, which was used until the discontinuation of the denomination in 1889. The Type 2 gold dollar has always held a certain allure for collectors, and the exceptionally rare proofs, because of the care with which they were produced, may be said to be the only examples of that design which show just what Longacre had intended; and none more so than this example, which is one of the very finest of the survivors.

  • USAUSA
  • 2013-09-24
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The Famous C.B., C.B.E., Fighter Operations "Triple" D.S.O., "Double" D.F.C. Group of Nineteen to Air Vice-Marshal J.E. "Johnnie" Johnson, Royal Air F

The Famous C.B., C.B.E., Fighter Operations "Triple" D.S.O., "Double" D.F.C. Group of Nineteen to Air Vice-Marshal J.E. "Johnnie" Johnson, Royal Air Force, the Officially Recognised Highest Scoring R.A.F. Fighter Pilot of the 1939-45 War (a) The Most Honourable Order of the Bath, Companion's (C.B.), Military Division, neck Badge, silver-gilt and enamel, in Spink and Son, London case of issue (b) The Most Excellent Order of the British Empire, Commander's (C.B.E.), 2nd type, Military Division, neck Badge, silver-gilt and enamel, in Collingwood, London case of issue (c) Distinguished Service Order, G.VI.R., silver-gilt and enamel, the reverse of the suspension bar officially dated '1943', with Bars for Second and Third Awards, the reverses officially dated '1943' and '1944' (d) Distinguished Flying Cross, George VI, the reverse officially dated '1941' and privately engraved, 'F./Lt. J.E. Johnson, 616 Squadron, 16th Sept.', with Bar for Second Award, the reverse officially dated '1942' (e) 1939-45 Star (f) Air Crew Europe Star, with 'France and Germany' clasp (g) Defence Medal 1939-45 (h) War Medal 1939-45 (i) Queen's Korea (Wg. Cdr., R.A.F.) (j) United Nations Korea (k) General Service 1962, one clasp, Radfan (A.V.M., R.A.F.) (l) Coronation 1953 (m) Air Efficiency Award, G.VI.R. (Act. Wg. Cdr., R.A.F.V.R.) (n) Belgium, Order of Leopold I, Officer's breast Badge, Military Division, silver-gilt and enamel (o) Belgium, Croix de Guerre, with palm (p) France, Legion of Honour, Commander's neck Badge, gilt and enamel (q) United States of America, Legion of Merit, Chevalier's breast Badge, gilt and enamel, with case of issue (r) United States of America, Distinguished Flying Cross (s) United States of America, Air Medal, enamel work slightly chipped in places and (j) with repaired wired suspension, otherwise generally extremely fine (19)

  • GBRGrande Bretagne
  • 2001-12-10
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A cased and factory engraved Colt Model 1851 Navy percussion revolver engraving attributed to Joseph Delaney

A cased and factory engraved Colt Model 1851 Navy percussion revolver engraving attributed to Joseph Delaney Serial no. 2383 (with a dot) for 1853, .36 caliber. 7 1/2 inch barrel stamped -Address Saml Colt New York City-. Barrel lug, loading lever, and frame with early vine style scroll engraving on a plain ground; stiff leaf engraving around muzzle. Hammer engraved with a wolf. Blued, case-hardened, and silver-plated finish. Cylinder with roll-engraved naval engagement marked Engaged 16 May 1843, Colt's Patent with serial no., and Engraved by W.L. Ormsby, New York. Triggerguard and gripstrap with extensive vine and scroll engraving. Varnished walnut grips. Complete with partitioned mahogany case, with key, lined in burgundy velour. Accessories include sloping charger Navy flask, brass Colt's Patent two-cavity mold with sprue cutter in the white, L-shaped combination tool, unopened and paper wrapped tin of 250 Eley Brothers percussion caps, and a skin pack of 6 cartridges, ...Hazard's powder for Colt pistols. Condition: Excellent. Barrel retains 98% plus dark blue finish with some light storage scratches and edge wear. Cylinder retains nearly 100% of blue finish with sharp scene. Lug, rammer, and frame show perhaps 30 to 40% case colors, faded in same areas, bright in protected areas. Triggerguard/gripstrap retain 100% unpolished silver-plated finish. Grips with 100% original varnish and some storage marks on right side. Two frame screws on left side slightly marred. Case with original finish; lid with scattered scratches and storage marks. Accessories excellent. See Illustration

  • USAUSA
  • 2014-11-11
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The Archive of Augustin and Narcisse Dupré

The Archive of Augustin and Narcisse Dupré Bonhams are pleased to offer this, until recently, unknown archive of Augustin Dupré, and his son Narcisse Dupré. This property is being sold with full title for the first time on the open market in its entirety. The vendor of this archive is the sole legatee of the Dupré family, and this has been confirmed and ruled upon by the French courts. While the collection is predominantly from the time of Augustin Dupré, several more modern items have been added to the collection by those who have cared for it over time. Footnotes AUGUSTIN DUPRÉ - (1748-1833), engraver of coins, medals, jetons, seals and related items; Dupré worked for Louis XVI and held the position of 'Graveur General des Monnaies' at the Paris Mint. He began his career as an engraver at the royal factory for weapons. In approximately 1770, he was established at Paris and became the student of the sculptor Louis David where he engraved his first medals. The French Revolution gave him the opportunity to further develop his art. Because the change of regime and the monetary reform required a full change of monetary types, a competition, initiated by the painter Louis David, was opened in April 1791 by the Convention Nationale. Dupré's design won and was adopted for the new currency, the "Louis Conventionnel". Following this success, Dupré was named Graveur Général des Monnaies by decree of the Assemblée Nationale on July 11, 1791. In France, before the revolution, there were 31 royal mints, but most of them were no more than sinecures. In 1789, there were no more than 17 mints, and Dupré wanted to have a great new mint in Paris to produce all French currency. However, the Assemblée Nationale rejected his idea and retained 8 mints: Paris, Lyon, Bordeaux, Bayonne, Perpignan, Nantes, Lille, and Strasbourg. He occupied his official position until 1803, the year in which he was dismissed by a decree of the First Consul of March 12, 1803. He was replaced at that time by Pierre-Joseph Tiolier. DUPRÉ'S MONETARY WORKS The French Revolution encouraged the artists to celebrate the new order. Augustine Dupré derived the inspiration of his allegoric compositions from the symbolism of antiquity (tables of law, genius of freedom, Hercules, Phrygian cap, fasces of lictors, scales, etc.). It was the triumph of neoclassical style. His first contribution was the Louis of gold, 24 livres, portraying Au Génie, the obverse still carrying the portrait of Louis XVI, the motto Roi des Français (King of the French), and the date 1792. The reverse represents a Génie ailé (winged genius) that writes the word Loi on a stèle, with the motto Le Règne de la Loi (the reign of the law) and the declaration An III de la liberté (year three of the liberty). An écu of six livres and a half écu in silver also retain this design. When the Republic was proclaimed, Dupré engraved the bulk of the new revolutionary decimal currency. He introduced the five franc silver piece struck with the image of Hercules, Union et Force which marked the renaissance of the franc, and the coins of 1 centime, 5 centimes, 1 décime and 2 décimes with the head of the republic wearing the Phrygian cap. Dupré was a talented engraver and the composition which he created for the 5 franc represented the Republic for almost 200 years. The écu à l'Hercule created in 1796, was again struck in 1848, then in 1870 and 1877. The new franc of 1960 renewed honor to Dupré by the striking of silver commemorative coins of 10 francs (1965–1973) and 50 francs (1974–1977). In 1996 the Fifth Republic also honored him by issuing a 5 franc commemorative coin. DUPRÉ'S MEDALS Before the French Revolution, Dupré had a reputation as one of the leading French medallists of the time. Two examples of Dupré's famous medals are in honor of Lavoisier and Admiral Suffren. His medals related to the American republic include: the Libertas Americana, 1783; the Greene medal, 1787; the Morgan and Jones medals, 1789; the Diplomatic medal, 1792; and two medals of Franklin, 1784 and 1786. Thomas Jefferson ordered the Diplomatic medal in 1790. It is unknown who ordered the two known medals of Benjamin Franklin; it is thought that Franklin, himself, did not. A SUMMARY OF THE COLLECTION: This collection is an extensive archive of material which is by and closely associated with Augustin Dupré Among the many preparatory sketches and drawings in the group are medallic designs for Daniel Morgan and diplomatic medals (Adams, Comitia Americana, pp. 129-138 and 199-218); while the many sketched drafts for French coinage include 'Union et Force' and Paix et Abondance' designs, the latter inscribed below 'piece d'argent d'un franc'. Among the preparatory strikings of medals are uniface examples in tin or lead of the Nathaniel Greene and Daniel Morgan medals (Adams, Comitia Americana, pp. 153-161, and 199-218). The medals themselves include the 1790 oval silver 'Pacte Federatif' (sim. Hennin 165), a bronze example of the Benjamin Franklin eripuit coelo fulmen medal (Adams, Comitia Americana, pp. 174-79), and lead examples of the Diplomatic and Libertas Americana medals which may be later productions. The archive is very extensive and includes some relevant correspondence involving Benjamin Franklin and Thomas Jefferson, who provides directions on how he wished General George Washington to appear on Dupré's 'Washington Before Boston' medal of 1776 (Adams, Comitia Americana, pp. 39-53). Also included are a number of letters written to Augustin Dupré from his sponsors, that provide insights into his association with North America and the significant part that he played in providing the dies for seven medals that constitute the Comitia Americana series. The archive also includes uniface strikings and miscellaneous trials of seals and jetons, as well as an interesting gilt-plaster impression, 70 mm. in diameter and dated 1787, which constitutes an apprentice's presentation piece from Dupré's pupil 'Lambert', the legend reading 'Hommage De Tendresse et de Reconnaissance'. For the ease of those interested in the collection it has been split into relevant sections within the listing of the catalog. MANUSCRIPTS AND DOCUMENTATION The archive also contains an assortment of original early correspondence to include: A. Dupré, autograph draft letter: "Voir les dessins J'aurais d'écrire repondre plus tôt à votre lettre que j'ai trouvé chez moi à monts à mon retour du voyage J'ai cachet de la liberté en petit de la medaille de 1776 le dessin à la plume parler du cachet franchir et de la tète liberté souvenir respectueux 2 plâtres dorées cadres cuivre" Loosely translated: "I was going to reply sooner to your letter which I found upon my return from traveling. I have the cachet (?) of the small format Liberty from the 1776 medal in ink sketch..." A. Dupré, autograph list of various medals and materials A. Dupré, design for the text face of the J.P. Jones medal, with notes (loosely translated) reading "curious and primitive / This coin was not struck ... / If it had been made in France or in America / It was given by Paul Jones to Mr. Dupré (who engraved the medal included here)..." Benjamin Franklin, letter in a secretarial hand, 1 p, 8vo, Passy, 4 May 1783, to A. Dupré: "M. Franklin prie M. Dupré de faire frapper le plutot possible les Medailles que Monsr. l'abbé Mochon lui commandera, et qui sont destinés pour Mr. le Cte. D'Angiviller" ("Mr Franklin requests of Mr Dupré to strike at the earliest opportunity the medals that the Abbot Mochon will order from him, and which are destined for the Count of Angiviller") William Temple Franklin (grandson of Benjamin Franklin), letter signed, 1 p, integral address panel, 8vo, 18 May 1785, to A. Dupré, suggesting that he hold off on constructing a press until the return to Paris of Mr Barclay (probably Thomas Barclay, America's first consul in France) and requesting that he stop by to discuss a small object. Manuscript contract signed by Colonel David Humphreys and A. Dupré, 1 p, 4to, Paris, 19 November 1785, contracting Dupré to produce the General Green medal, detailing the design of the medal and quantity Thomas Jefferson, autograph manuscript listing of "Projects de Médailles", 1 p plus 2 pp in an unidentified hand, 4to (conjoined leaves), docketed in unidentified hand "Devices projected by the Academy of Belles Lettres for Medals for Morgan, Washington & Howard" The Jefferson portion being in French, and reading (loosely translated): "Medal for General Washington of 30 lines in diameter. On the one side the head of the General with this text Georgio Washington supremo duci exercitum adsertori libertatis comitia americana. Reverse, the evacuation of Boston. The American army advancing in good form towards this city which one perceives in the distance while the English army hurries towards the shore to get aboard the ships which fill the harbor. In front of the American army appears General Washington, on horseback, among a group of officers to whom he is pointing out the flight of the enemy. Text: Hostibus primo fugatis. Inscription: Bostonium recuperatum die XVII Martii MDCCLXXXVI... "There will be approximately 350 examples of this medal in silver and in bronze. There will be perhaps one example in gold of each medal. It is necessary therefore that the coins be guaranteed not to exceed 350 examples." Narcisse Dupré, manuscript "Notice / Paul Jones", 3 pp, 4to, being biographical notes and details of the medal Narcisse Dupré, manuscript copy of J.P. Jones' journal, 22 pp, 4to Thomas Jefferson, autograph manuscript, 1 p, 4to, in French, being a description of General Morgan medal. Loosely translated: "Medal for General Morgan of 24 lines in diameter. The General at the head of his army leads a charge against the enemy, who take flight. Text. Victoria libertatis vindex. Inscription. Fugatis captis, aut caesis ad Cowpens hostibus. 17 Jan. 1781. Reverse: America, recognisable through her badge, rests her left hand on a trophy of arms and flags. On the right, crown of the General leaning against her. Text. Danieli Morgan duci exercitus. Inscription. Comitia Americana." Thomas Jefferson, autograph letter signed integrally, 1 p, integral address panel, 8vo, 3 January 1789, to A. Dupré. Loosely translated: "Mr. Jefferson, having received the orders regarding the medals to be produced, will be delighted to discuss them with Mr. Dupré, if he would like to do him the honor of stopping in at his home tomorrow morning before 11 o'clock." Thomas Jefferson, autograph letter signed integrally twice, 1 p, 8vo, 13 February 1789, to A. Dupré. Loosely translated: "Mr. Jefferson has the honor of sending to Mr. Dupré the specifications for the medals for General Morgan and Rear-Admiral Paul Jones which he has just received from the Academy of Belles Lettres, and which job he proposes to Mr. Dupré, [...] to strike 350 of each medal in gold, silver or bronze, and to provide the proofs of them in pewter by the end of next March, in order that the medals may all be struck before 15 April. [Mr. Jefferson] requests that he be so kind as to indicate the terms under which he will undertake the work, and Mr. Jefferson will have the honor to reply as soon as he receives this." Thomas Jefferson, autograph letter signed integrally three times, 1 p, integral address panel, 8vo, 15 February 1789, to A. Dupré. Loosely translated: "Mr. Jefferson has the honor of pointing out to Mr. Dupré that he will not give 2400 [francs?] for the 24-line medals either to Mr. Duvivier nor to Mr. Gautteaux. That's how much he paid to Mr. Dupré for the medal for General Greene, and Mr. Dupré asked for nothing more than that last time, for the General Morgan medal. Mr. Jefferson cannot therefore agree to give any more. For that price he expects that Mr. Dupré could produce the best, himself, and not by using junior artists. Regarding the terms, perhaps it might be possible to wait a little for the medal for Admiral Paul Jones, that officer being currently in Europe. Mr. Jefferson has the honor of awaiting the reply of Mr. Dupré and will be delighted to finalize this arrangement with him." Thomas Jefferson, autograph manuscript, ½ p, 4to, being a description of the 24-line medal for Vice-Admiral John Paul Jones, with pencil notes by Dupré below. "Medal for Vice-Admiral John Paul Jones, of 24 lines. Obverse: his head. (Mr. Houdon will provide the bust in plaster.) Text: Joanni-Paulo Jones classis praefecto. Inscription: Comitia Americana. Reverse: naval battle. Text: Hostium navibus captis aut fugatis. Inscription: ad oram Scotiae 23 Sept. 1779." Thomas Jefferson, autograph letter signed integrally, 1 p, integral address panel, 8vo, 23 February 1789, to A. Dupré. Loosely translated: "Mr. Jefferson is going to print the explanations of all the medals, for sending with the medals to the monarchs of Europe. He lacks the medal for Mr. Franklin, made by Mr. Dupré. He requests that Mr. Dupré lend him an example, and also to give him the explanation thereof, if indeed there be one as there must be no doubt." William Short, US Chargé d'affaires in Paris, manuscript letter (possibly autograph and signed integrally), 1 p, integral address panel, 8vo, 3 October, 1789, to the bankers Grand & Cie regarding the silver used in Dupré's medals. F. de Moustier, autograph letter signed, 1 p, integral address panel, 4to, Paris, 25 October 1791, to A. Dupré, regretting the delay in the production of a medal, referring to William Short, and remarking on an American medal being produced by a Frenchman and abroad. Manuscript letter in an unidentified hand, 2 pp, 4to, no place or date, possibly a draft. Apparently to A. Dupré, upbraiding him for mistakes and delays. John Paul Jones, autograph note signed integrally, 1 p, 4to, "samedi soir", requesting that Dupré release the silver medal for Mr. de la Coste to Mr. Rosse, porter for the Assembly. Narcisse Dupré, autograph notes, 2 pp, 4to, relating to medal production and a to do list. Narcisse Dupré, autograph notes, 4 pp, 4to, relating to the medals struck for the US. Manuscript, "Inventaire des meubles et objects composant le mobilier de la Villa de Beaumevielle au Lazaich", 27 pp plus 2 pp loosely inserted, folio, stapled into manuscript wrappers. PICTURES, DRAWINGS AND SKETCHES The archive contains a detailed cross section of art work from simple sketches to larger pictures, a number of the early works have an oval "studio" stamp with the wording "A. Dupré. fecit" as well as a circular stamp with the initials N.D. (Narcisse Dupré). The majority of works are pencil on paper of differing qualities, some charcoal, others with color. The better works are listed in detail, in addition there are several modern reproduction printed pieces within the archive, which have been added more recently. The total number of unframed pieces amounts to 129 items to include: Five differing sketches of a combination of Liberty and a classical figure placing laurel wreaths upon the heads of two young figures. The sizes range from (12.3cm x 12.8cm) to (16cm x 13cm). Two differing designs for the reverse of a medallion or coin both featuring Hercules seated (14.8cm x 12.1.cm) and (16.3cm x 16.4cm) Three differing designs for the Daniel Morgan medal (11.7cm x 12.2cm), (10.2cm x 11.3cm) and (18.3cm x 17.5cm) Three differing designs featuring elegant dressed gentleman with curtseying lady in classical attire, one design with MUNIFICENCE ROYL at the top (11cm x 11.9cm) (11 x 12cm) (11.3cm x 10.8cm) Classical female figure holding scroll marked CONSTITUTION (14.8cm x 15.5cm) Obverse and reverse design of medallion SOCIETE MEDICOPHIE ANTROPIQUE (52mm diam.) Obverse and reverse designs for 5 Francs L'An 12 (38mm diam.) and sketch of reverse of 5 Francs L'An 9 (10.3cm x 12cm) A Napoleonic portrait (22.2cm x 15.5cm) A further Napoleonic portrait (13.8cm x 9.3cm) A Naval or Military Officer (20.8cm x 12.4cm) A single sheet of paper with 5 differing designs of the head of Liberty, one in medallion form with Republique Francaise (24.5cm x 20cm) Bust of Napoleon in coat with high collar (21.2cm x 16.5cm) Two designs of Cherubs sitting upon lions (9.5cm x 14cm) and (6.6cm x 9.7cm) Two classical figures walking through street with Surete Publique below (15.3cm x 16.2cm) Sketch entitled Piece d'Or featuring seated female classical figure holding olive branch PAIX ET ABONDANCE with L'AN 5 in exergue (18.5cm x 18cm) A sketch possibly of St. Jerome and the lion (15cm x 14cm) Small oval sketch of the head of Liberty facing left (7cm x 5.8cm) A sketch having two circular designs with writing relating to the John Paul Jones medal, one side dated 23 Sept 1779 in the exergue (13.3cm x 18.8cm) A sketch of an angelic figure placing a wreath over the head of a Naval Officer standing among discarded weapons, with ships in the distance (26.2cm x23.6cm) A sketch of 'Hercules' standing over defeated foe pushing back clouds with 'Franklin' written below and Dupré 1786 written in ink below (19.3cm x 16.5cm) A similar example with 'Franklin' written below (17.9cm x 14cm) A further sketch of 'Hercules' holding back clouds within classical ruins with legend and date of 22nd January 1774 in exergue and 'Franklin' below (17.4cm x 14cm) A drawing of the American eagle holding arrows and olive branch (possibly a forerunner of the following sketch) (19.8cm x 19.3cm) A drawing of the American eagle with THE CONSULAR SEAL OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA around edge (11.1cm x 13.3cm) A circular drawing of a design for Aboukir featuring a classical figure crowning a naked warrior with weapons below, the exergue inscribed BATAILLE D'ABOUKIR 7. Thor. AN. 7. REPN (23.7mm diam) A circular drawing featuring a classical warrior, a reclining Hercules and a kneeling classical maiden who is being presented with a statue, in the foreground a major battle taking place with the pyramids behind, to the edge the wording LA LIBERTÉ DON NÉE ALEGYPTE , BATAILLE DES PYRAMIDES in the exergue (23.8mm) Liberty and classical figure with ALLIANCE ETERNELLE around edge, the reverse AU SOUVERAIN DE LA TOSCANE AMI DES FRANCAIS PRAIRAIL AN IX JUN 1801 (15.3cm x 22cm) A drawing in reverse of official seals including Le Peuple Souverain for Republique Francaise L'An 5 (23.7cm x 19.4cm) A circular drawing in reverse for a seal featuring Hercules standing next to an obelisk with a crushed lion and snake below, holding a scroll with eye above and CONSTITUI** DES FRANCAIS, the obelisk marked LA NATION LA LOI ET LE ROI (21.9mm diameter) The remainder of the loose drawings include an assortment of classical figures, children, cherubs, wildlife etc. The level of detail varies considerably, some have much detail, others less so. The majority appear to have little or no numismatic significance here. FRAMED PIECES The framed items include the following in a combination of mainly pencil but some are pencil and charcoal. Hercules seated holding two classical figures in one hand and club in other, with UNION ET FORCE around edge, the exergue empty but signed Dupré. Outside the drawing piece d'argent d'un franc written in ink, the reverse of the frame with ink Voir le buste de Desforges ou theatre francais (15.7cm x 13.5cm) An angelic figure holding rod in one hand and dividers in other flying over the earth, the dividers touching two points on the earth, the reverse of the frame written in ink Systeme decimal (10.8cm x 10.5cm). Classical figures in a forest with hunting dogs (25cm x 30.5cm) 10 franc reverse with seated Liberty, marked Dupré fecit in ink (20cm x 20cm) An octagonal sketch of two classical figures holding arms on seafront with ships in the distance, with legend LA PAIX RAMENE L'ABONDAN (18.7cm x 18.7cm) A charcoal and colored mix of two classical figures with cherub in a garden or similar, the reverse with words, Serment D'Amour (26cm x 25cm) A classical hunting scene with figures and hunting dogs attacking a large wild boar. (21.2cm x 38cm). A young stag having been tied to a tree with two hunting dogs beside (36cm x 25cm) *A framed drawing of une femme tirant a l'arc standing left, probably a personification of Artemis of Diana as Goddess of the Hunt. This image is also repeated in a few of the pencil sketches and is a truly striking and of substantial aesthetic merit and value. Other drawings include various hunting scenes, classical scenes, agricultural medal design and other pictures, most marked with the Dupré stamp or ink, some not but purported to be of the artist. MEDALLIONS, COINS AND NUMISMATIC MATERIAL Augustin Dupré is famously noted for producing some of the major American medals of the time that include the Libertas Americana medal of 1783, the John Paul Jones Medal of 1789 as well as the Diplomatic Medal of 1790, and the two Franklin Medals of 1784 and 1786. His role in the production of French coinage involved him producing the majority of the decimal coinage. The Union et Force that featured on the five franc coin with the image of Hercules (refer to picture section) was his design and almost announced a new beginning for the franc. Such a design has featured on many subsequent times such is the power of this image. The archive contains a small collection of contemporary numismatic specimens and examples that include: A uniface reverse of the Daniel Morgan medal in white metal (55mm diameter) A uniface reverse of the Mayor of Paris medal in white metal (52mm diameter) A uniface reverse of the Daniel Green medal in white metal (50mm diameter) An example of the Daniel Morgan medal in white metal (55mm diameter) An example of the Libertas Americana medal in white metal (47mm diameter) An example of a possible trial reverse of the John Paul Jones medal, featuring two tall ships next to a lighthouse, together with another example just of a single tall ship. Both pieces made from white metal (40mm x 34mm, 33mm diameter) A uniface reverse of the portrait of Louis XVI (28mm diameter) A uniface bust of Raphel Durbin in white metal (68mm diameter) A brass seal base (handle absent) featuring the head of Liberty with the words LIBERTE above and a Phrygian cap below. Much speculation rests on this item. This particular piece might be considered one of the earliest Liberty designs for the United States of America. Simple in its appearance, this particular design is not known to have been officially granted for use, but has to be of exceptional importance within the early stages of American design within official government circles. A sizeable collection of uniface white metal trials or specimens to include: classical figures, assorted classical busts, man on horseback, single cherubs, cherubs seated on a lion, wheat sheafs, prancing horses and similar appliqués. In addition there are a number of original coins from the time featuring his designs, as well as some minor production pieces, white metal plaques, many without numismatic significance. BOOKS AND FOLIO Dupré (Augustin) Observations présentées au Comité des Monnaies... Octobre 1790, folding letterpress table, inscribed by Narcisse Dupré with details about his father, nineteenth century calf-backed boards, 8vo,[Paris, 1790]; and 2 additional copies (3) A.Dupré, manuscript inventory of medals struck, books owned, etc., approximately 80 pp, contemporary vellum-backed boards, spine detached, folio. OTHER ITEMS AND MISCELLANEA Augustin Dupré was made a Knight of the Legion of Honour in 1830 by Louis Philippe (1830-48). The archive contains the medal he was awarded which is made from gold, silver and enamel, with the obverse of Henry IV at the center and three lilies at the center of the reverse, a contemporary piece for the time of the award. In addition the archive includes a lock of Augustin Dupré's hair housed in an oval wooden glazed frame, this hair has a red ribbon used for the Legion of Honour as a backing, the reverse of this frame has been written in ink "Cheveux d'Augustin Dupré 1833 derriere le ruban de la Legion d'Honneur Fait Chevalier par Louis Philippe en 183". The last number of the year of presentation is absent but would have been a '0'. This highest honor was largely granted at the request of his friend, Le Marquis de Lafayette. A collection of assorted table seals, with a combination of metal, wood and marble/stone handles, one with "D" engraved, another "MD" and others which may have been commissions, and appear to have no family connection. To complement these, the archive has a number of wax seal impressions (65), likely to have been taken for reference purposes after commissioned seals had been made, perhaps in case of repeat orders or for a personal record of work over time, examples include Administration des Monnaies, Poids et Mesures Republicain and Bureau de Garantie des Matières D'Or et D'Argent, with assorted heraldic and similar examples. A number of engravers tools, writing implements, minor items of equipment used in the manufacturing processes. Finally, a number of items are included that date from after the time of A and N. Dupré. These include modern coins and medallions that were produced in the 20th Century and commemorate events that encompassed Dupré's work. These we are assuming have been added by those who had inherited this archive and who still had a fondness for his work and for numismatics as a whole. These include 1 franc, 5, 10 and 50 francs, as well as a 100 franc piece in gold, together with reproductions of various art medals copied from original styles, such as the Franklin Medal, Morgan and Jones medals, as well as minor works featuring or representing him including a bronze plaque portrait of him in relief. Overall, this collection represents an extremely rare opportunity to acquire an undisturbed archive of material dating back to the late 18th and early 19th Centuries that relates to early American and post French revolution history within medallic design. OF THE HIGHEST RARITY. SOLD AS A COLLECTION. CLOSE INSPECTION HIGHLY RECOMMENDED

  • USAUSA
  • 2014-04-02
Prix ​​d'adjudication
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1863 $20 Cameo PF-65 NGC

1863 $20 Cameo PF-65 NGC James B. Longacre, Designer Obverse: Head of Liberty facing left, wearing a bejeweled coronet on which LIBERTY is emblazoned; around, thirteen stars; below, 1863. Reverse: Heraldic eagle, head facing left, with spread wings and shield emblazoned on its chest holding olive branch and three arrows in its talons; above, an oval of thirteen stars amidst rays of Glory; around, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA; below, TWENTY D. Condition: NGC Proof 65 Cameo (Certificate number: 1963253-013 – Photo Proof 10-07 "...tied with just two others as the finest Cameo pieces certified by NGC."; previous Photo Proof 07-06 [number 1633877-039]) "...tied with just two others as the finest certified by NGC."). Excellent, rich orange-peel surfaces, with crisply defined cameo contrast against nearly "black" deeply-mirrored fields with minimal hairlines. Insignificant planchet specks between the last star and head of Liberty, a 'smudge' of inclusions above the eagle's head, and a minuscule 'accent' above the T of TWENTY, confirm the amazing pedigree of this gem. References: This Coin Published: Breen (Proofs) p. 122; Akers (1982) p. 65; Garrett & Guth (Encyclopedia) p. 495; Bowers (Guide Book of Double Eagles) p. 108, this piece illustrated. Other references: Breen (Encyclopedia) 7215. (PCGS 89075) Condition Census: One of the finest known, NGC cites one example of equivalent grade (with a star), and one finer; PCGS has graded none this fine (Proof-64 Cameo, finest). (07-13) Rarity: Extremely rare, only thirty proofs were produced. Walter Breen (Proofs) was able to pinpoint ten specific examples, a figure that he slightly expanded (12-15) in his Encyclopedia. Breen quoted from coin dealer S. Hudson Chapman (though cautioned as to the veracity),who had been told by John F. McCoy (a prominent collector in the 1860s) that "he knew only 30 pieces were struck and of these some were remelted at the mint." Akers estimated a survival of 11 to 12 pieces, an estimate with which Garrett and Guth essentially agree (including those in the Smithsonian and American Numismatic Society Collections); they also note that in addition to the impaired examples, the population estimates are skewed by multiple re-submissions. Regardless, the present lot, formerly in the collections of Harry Bass and Gaston DiBello, has been cited as one of the very finest known, exceeding in grade even the lovely (Cameo Proof 64 NGC CAC) Henry Miller specimen (ex Johns Hopkins University, Garrett [1976, lot 404] and Ely collections [though not so-noted in the catalogue]), whose catalogue description noted presently offered coin as a noteworthy example. Provenance: Harry W. Bass Collection, Part II, Bowers and Merena, October 2-4, 1999, lot 1759, Proof-64 PCGS, "Dazzling ... A Fantastic Rarity ... None Finer Graded" ($66,700); Gaston DiBello Collection, Stack's, May 14-16, 1970, lot 1224. Note: The double eagle was created as a result of the huge discoveries of gold in California in 1848 and the ensuing Gold Rush. It was an event that put the United States on the map as a world power of immense wealth and with an unlimited future. However, just over a decade later the Civil War rocked the optimism of the nation to its core. It seems difficult to imagine that the United States government, mid-way through one of the most traumatic and tragic episodes in American history, continued to make Proof coins for collectors. Even though they were made in extremely limited quantities, most remained unsold and were later melted. In addition to the wartime drag on the economy, beginning in 1862 the Mint required all purchasers of Proof gold coins to buy complete sets only, making their acquisition that much more expensive. And, to make the transaction ever more difficult, the Mint required that the gold Proofs had to be paid for in gold (or a gold draft) as the then circulating paper money was valued at a discount.

  • USAUSA
  • 2013-09-24
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New Discovery Stockton California National Bank Note Collection

New Discovery Stockton California National Bank Note Collection We are pleased to announce the offering of the First National Bank of Stockton California collection of National Bank Notes including a new discovery - Series 1873 $10 Gold Bank Note (Friedberg 1146), serial number 1, a Condition Census example. Also present is a rare Series 1882 $10 "Value Back" National Bank Note, also from The First National Bank of Stockton, (Friedberg 577). To finish out the inventory, three Series 1929 Small Size Nationals, $10 (Friedberg S-2055), $20 (Friedberg S-2106), and $50 (Friedberg S-2157) are present, each bearing the unique premier serial number A000001A. All are being sold as a group, not as single lots. Fr. 1146 $10 Series 1873 National Gold Bank Note, First National Gold Bank, Stockton California. National Gold Bank Notes of California are one of the most romantic of all currency issues. Their existence relates to the California Gold Rush of 1848 and they remain today as tangible mementos of the Winning of the West. These notes are easily associated with gold. First, the paper on which they are printed is a yellow-gold color (instead of white), an effort to imitate gold and secondly, the reverses show a group of assorted American gold coins ranging from one to twenty dollars. Interestingly enough, these coins appear to be well circulated, not Mint State examples chosen for the photograph. As the population of California continued to grow, trade and commerce increased to such an extent that the California banks were soon handling enormous quantities of gold coins in their daily transactions. In those days in California, gold was the universal medium of exchange. The handling and counting of so many coins was time consuming and a barrier to the efficient operation of the banks. In order to facilitate these numerous gold transactions, Congress passed the Act of July 12, 1870 which authorized nine Gold Banks in California and one in Boston to issue and circulate currency redeemable in gold coin. This was highly unusual since the Treasury Department had not yet resumed specie payments, which did not come until 1879. The denominations issued were $5, $10, $20, $50, $100, and $500, but not all banks issued all denominations. These banks were Gold Banks in addition to being National Banks and their operation came under the general provisions of the National Banking Act of 1863. They were required to deposit the legal amount of United States Bonds with the Treasurer of the United States. The obligation of redeeming these notes in gold coin rested with each bank and not the Federal government. The notes were readily accepted in California at par with gold, and most went through a long life of active and useful circulation. Indeed, so active was the circulation that very few notes have survived above Very Fine condition (most are Good to Fine with apparent damage). The First National Gold Bank of Stockton California was organized in 1872 under U.S. laws as a gold bank, but in 1879 was re-organized under the general banking laws of the United States, thus ending the Gold Bank status for its charter. This 1873 $10 Gold Note is signed by H.H. Hewlett, President of the bank at the time, and a prominent citizen of Stockton (San Joaquin County). Hewlett apparently clipped this note from the top of the first sheet received at his bank and subsequently gave it to his daughter. The top reverse margin of the $10 Gold Bank Note exhibits the following hand written inscription: "1873 - Lizzie Hewlett to be kept as a keepsake being the first 10 dollar note issued and given her by her Father." The obverse features vignettes of Benjamin Franklin drawing electricity from the sky with a kite and a key, on the right, Liberty soars on an eagle, clutching lightning in her hand. The reverse features the California State emblem to the left and an eagle with wings partially spread standing on a shield at the right. The center vignette is a beautiful display of United States gold coins in various denominations within a large oval, a unique design for these gold notes. Since these notes were printed in sheets of four subjects, (three $10s and a single $20 at the bottom), the extended margin at the top that includes the additional Federal serial number validates this was the first note on the sheet, and the first sheet issued by the bank indicated by serial number 1 at the left bottom. The obverse margin shows some minor penciling including the word "Gooding" and a small hole. Also at the upper right of the margin, the numbers 2503 are reversed. This is not the charter number since it is 2412. Over the years, the note has been folded and handled, presumably by the heirs of the estate, not placed in general circulation. We estimate the grade at Very Fine to Extremely Fine, much finer than normally seen on these rare Gold Coin Notes. Other than the previously described penciling in the top margin, a small, circular pencil mark is visible (from both sides) in the upper left margin to the right of "Gooding." A tiny tear is also present to the left of the Treasury serial number in the upper margin. Fr. 577 $10 Series 1882 "Value Back" National Bank Note, First National Bank, Stockton California, Charter #(P)2412. The Act of July 12, 1882 provided for a series of new note designs with denominations of $5 through $100. All existing national banks had their corporate lives extended 20 years. Newly organized national banks and those which were extended began receiving the new Series 1882 notes from the Treasury. Congressional actions in the following years resulted in three distinct types of Series 1882 notes: Series1882 "Brown Backs," Series 1882 "Date Backs," and Series 1882 "Value Backs." This note is a "Value Back." The Aldrich-Vreeland Act expired on June 30, 1915. After that date, national banks were no longer permitted to use "other securities" to secure their notes -- only Unites States Bonds could be deposited. Banks that had been issuing Series 1882 "Date Backs" began to issue Series 1882 "Value Backs." On 1882 "Value Backs" the denomination is spelled out across the central portion of the back replacing the "1882-1908" of the previously issued "Date Backs." The face designs are basically the same of the previous issues. The issue of 1882 "Value Backs" ended in 1922. Generally speaking, "Value Back" Nationals become more scarce as you head West, with many of the exceedingly rare issues from states such as Oklahoma, New Mexico, Arizona, Colorado, and California. According to the Kelly Census, only 12 large size notes (including all denominations) are still outstanding. This Series 1882 $10, Charter number 2412, from the First National Bank of Stockton shows light wear, but still exhibits brightly colored inks and white paper. The obverse design is similar to that of the preceding note but without the references to gold coins. On the reverse at the left, the head of William P. Fessenden, the Secretary of the Treasury in 1864, and on the right, a seated figure representing mechanics. The value TEN DOLLARS is at the center. We grade this note Extremely Fine with a few creases. There are no pinholes or tears. As an identifier, when F.A. Bramblitt (Head Cashier) signed the note, a small curving ink mark appeared on the back through the paper. This is mentioned only as a pedigree identifier, not a distraction. A rarely seen "Value Back National" from this coveted California bank. Fr. S-2055 Series 1929 $10 First National Bank of Stockton California, Charter 2412. Type One. Serial Number A000001A. The change from large size notes to small size notes took place in July 1929, and affected all types of Federal currency. It came about for two reasons: small size notes were cheaper to produce, and the Treasury wanted to adopt a uniform currency design for all forms of paper money. Small size Nationals were issued from July 1929 to May 1935 after which National Bank Notes were no longer issued. The discontinuance was brought about by the Treasury recall of certain United States bonds, thus making them unavailable as security for further issues of "Nationals." Each of the three small size National Bank Notes in this group represent the first notes issued by the First National Bank of Stockton, Charter #2412, in July 1929. Each of the three denominations offered in this collection, like all other small sized Nationals, was printed on a vertical sheet of 12 subjects which was subsequently cut into two sheets containing six (vertical) notes. When the Bureau of Engraving and Printing received an order from a specific bank, the notes were then overprinted with the bank name, officer's signatures, and charter number, all in black ink. Finally, in a third step, the serial numbers and Treasury seal were overprinted in brown ink. This note was saved from the first day it was received in Stockton California by descendants of the Hewlett family. As is typical for long-time storage by non-collectors, it now shows signs of light handling and creases. A small, inconspicuous red stain is in lower portion of the 1 of 10 at the upper right, and a pencil mark is in the upper right margin. Fr. S-2106 Series 1929 $20 First National Bank of Stockton California, Charter 2412. Type One. Serial Number A000001A. According to the Kelly reference, only 16 small sized National Bank Notes comprise the Census for the First National Bank of Stockton. We can find few auction records for this rare bank (including large and small sized notes), and all we have seen are lower grade examples. We grade this note XF/AU with a small pencil mark "H" in the upper right margin. Minor creasing shows. This, possibly, was an H indicating the Hewlett family. Fr. S-2157 Series 1929 $50 First National Bank of Stockton California, Charter 2412. Type One. Serial Number A000001A. The third and final small sized National Bank Note from this collection. It is a high grade example with bright paper and inks, showing only the slightest handling and creasing. We grade this example AU with tiny pencil marks in the upper left margin with resemble "OCH," possibly the initials of a Hewlett relative. The backs of the $10 and $20 notes are a slightly deeper green color, the $50 is a shade lighter. The above-listed Stockton Bank Note Collection represents a unique opportunity for the collector of rare Nationals to acquire five highly desirable examples that have never been offered before. All notes are being sold as a group only and will not be offered as separate lots.

  • USAUSA
  • 2014-09-01
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1964 MASERATI 5000 GT COUPE ALLEMANO

1964 MASERATI 5000 GT COUPE ALLEMANO N° de série : AM 103 # 058 Moteur : 8 cylindres en V à 90° en aluminium, numéro # 058 Période de production : 1959/1964 En 1954, le championnat du monde des marques se courait avec des voitures de sport bi-place et avait un retentissement au moins égal à celui des pilotes. Les barquettes de sport de ces années cinquante étaient ce que l'on faisait de plus beau dans le domaine de l'automobile. Mercedes, Jaguar, Aston Martin, Ferrari et Maserati, pour ne parler que des plus grands, se disputaient le titre. En 1954 donc, Maserati confia à Giulio Alfieri la maîtrise d'œuvre d'une voiture lui permettant de viser le titre des constructeurs. Un châssis fut mis en chantier et l'ingénieur Guido Taddeucci étudia un moteur V8 double arbre, bloc et culasse en alliage léger de 4.5 L de cylindrée. Les arbres à cames étaient entraînés par une cascade de pignons, quatre carburateurs double corps Weber 45 IDM dans le centre du V assuraient l'alimentation cependant que l'allumage comportait deux magnétos et seize bougies. La puissance espérée était de 400 CV. Le projet prit du retard en 1955, l'accident de Levegh sur Mercedes au Mans n'incitant pas à l'euphorie. Le moteur était cependant prêt en juin 1956 et fut monté dans le châssis de la 350 S de Moss aux Mille Miles 1956. Stirling Moss et Denis Jenkinson étaient sortis de la route peu avant Rome alors qu'ils étaient cinquièmes, leur numéro de course étant 554. Ce châssis en gros tubes d'acier de section ovale surmonté d'une superstructure de tubes d'acier ronds de petit diamètre dérivait directement du 300 S avec son pont arrière De Dion. La suspension avant était à roues indépendantes avec des triangles superposés, des amortisseurs télescopiques et des ressorts hélicoïdaux, alors qu'à l'arrière le pont De Dion était soutenu par des ressorts à lames semi-elliptiques. Le 7 août, la voiture participa au Grand Prix de Suède et montra ses faiblesses et ses qualités. Très rapide, la 450 S était fragile du côté transmission dont le spécialiste Colotti avait eu la maîtrise d'œuvre. Après le Grand Prix de Suède, on installa sur la voiture des freins de grand diamètre (tambours de 400 mm à l'avant et 300 mm à l'arrière) et une nouvelle carrosserie fut réalisée à la main chez Fantuzzi. Ainsi, pour 1957, la 450 S suscita chez Maserati de légitimes espoirs pour le championnat. Mercedes s'était retiré depuis deux ans, l'adversaire restait Ferrari avec ses sublimes 315 S et 335 S qui furent les plus belles Ferrari ouvertes de tous les temps. La saison démarra à Buenos Aires. La 450 S pilotée par Fangio et Moss s'envola, mais cassa sa transmission au cinquante-huitième tour. Aux 12 heures de Sebring, Behra et Fangio sur la 450 S, # 4503, gagnèrent et Maserati prit la tête du championnat. Au Mille Miles 1957, Moss-Jenkinson, les recordmen de l'épreuve, étaient favoris sur la 450 S, # 4505. Behra avait percuté un camion avec # 4503 pendant les essais. Les voitures, comme d'ailleurs les Ferrari 335 S, roulaient à 300 km/h sur les longues lignes droites au bord de l'Adriatique et dans les derniers kilomètres entre Bologne et Brescia. Moss cassa sa pédale de freins après 12 km… Scarlatti finit 3ème sur une Maserati 300 S et Ferrari gagna dans la tristesse avec Taruffi sur 315 S, et Von Trips, à trois minutes, finit second. De Portago et son passager Nelson, sur Ferrari 335 S, eurent un accident mortel à 40 km de l'arrivée. Ce fut la fin des Mille Miles. Les 450 S seront encore battues au Nürburgring le 26 mai, au Mans où Fangio tourna pourtant à plus de 200 km/h sur un tour. Behra et Moss gagnèrent en Suède et la dernière chance de Maserati de remporter le championnat s'envola à Caracas, la dernière épreuve de l'année 1957, où l'écurie Maserati perdit toutes ses voitures sur accidents. Ferrari enleva le championnat du monde des marques avec 30 points devant Maserati 25 points. Adolfo Orsi, malgré le titre des conducteurs qu'obtint Fangio sur Maserati 250 F, renonça à la compétition et le championnat sport fut désormais limité à 3 litres de cylindrée en Europe, les 450 S terminant leur carrière aux Etats-Unis. A la fin de la saison 57, il restait à l'usine des moteurs de 450 S non utilisés alors que Maserati venait de se lancer dans la fabrication en série de la 3500 GT. L'ingénieur Alfieri eut l'idée de marier les deux, c'est-à-dire de monter dans un châssis renforcé de 3500 GT le fabuleux V8 compétition de la 450 S et de commander à Touring une carrosserie " haute couture ". On dit aussi que Rezza Pahlavi, Shah d'Iran, grand amateur d'automobiles exceptionnelles, et ne voulant pas se contenter d'une 3500 GT, avait passé commande d'une voiture spéciale avec le formidable V8. Toujours est-il que le Shah obtint la première 5000 GT construite, # AM 103 002. La deuxième, # AM 103 003, fut celle du Salon de Turin 1959, vendue à M. Basil Read. La troisième, # AM 103 004, eut comme premier propriétaire M. Rolf Helm. Seules ces trois voitures eurent des moteurs directement issus du 450 S de compétition. L'ingénieur Alfieri se contenta de donner au moteur de course un peu plus de cylindrée en augmentant l'alésage de 93.8 mm à 98.5 mm tout en gardant la même course de 81 mm ; la cylindrée passant donc à 4937.8 cm3. Les voitures suivantes auront des cotes de 94 mm x 89 mm, et une cylindrée légèrement différente de 4941.1 cm3. Les trois premières voitures ont conservé pour leur moteur le système d'échappement très " compétition ", des doubles arbres à cames en tête entraînés par une cascade de pignons et non par une chaîne triple comme sur les 5000 GT ultérieures. La voiture présentée est une des dernières Maserati 5000 GT construites, elle est donc équipée de la boite à Cinq rapports et de l'injection mécanique Lucas. Elle est équipée d'un superbe volant Nardi trois branches et jante bois, d'une radio d'époque et de glaces électriques. # 058 est un coupé Allemano de couleur bleu " Blu Sera ", cuir noir Connoly (référence 154/4) d'origine. D'après l'excellente étude de Luigi Orsini et Franco Zagari seules 31 Maserati 5000 GT auraient été construites (sans compter #AM 103 002). # 058 fut livrée neuve début 1964 via l'importateur Maserati en Espagne " Auto Paris " à son premier propriétaire Monsieur José Bascones Ayreto de Barcelone qui la vendit en Décembre 1989 à Jean Guikas qui nous la confia pour la vendre, ici même, en Décembre 1990, avant de la céder à son propriétaire actuel non sans l'avoir restaurée. Le moteur fut refait chez Giulani, l'injection révisée, système de freinage neuf, carrosserie décapée et repeinte comme à l'origine en " Blu Sera " (référence Fiat : 439) chez Canisero à Marseille. Depuis, la voiture, un des fleurons du musée de Lohéac, a peu tourné mais elle a été soigneusement entretenue et remise en route tous les mois. Maserati n'a pu nous confirmer pour quelle raison #058 avait été équipé d'une pipe d'admission spéciale. Nous avons trouvé cette rare Maserati en très bon état de présentation et de fonctionnement, et la vigueur de son moteur nous a impressionné. Comme à l'époque s'il faut avoir une Maserati, c'est bien cette exclusive 5000 GT. Copyright des photos illustrant le catalogue : Thomas594canalblog.com The 1954 World Sportscar Championship was contested by twin-seater sportscars, and had at least as much impact as the Drivers' Championship. In the 1950s sports cars were the nec plus ultra in the automobile field as Mercedes, Jaguar, Aston Martin, Ferrari and Maserati - to mention just the leading names - vied for the title. In 1954 Maserati asked Giulio Alfieri to produce a car that could challenge for the Sportscar title. Work began on the chassis, with engineer Guido Taddeucci planning a twin-camshaft, 4.5-litre V8 engine with light-alloy block and cylinder-head. The camshafts had cascade pinion gearing, and were fed by four Weber 45 IDM double-body carburettors in the centre of the V; the ignition system involved two magnetos and sixteen spark-plugs. Anticipated power was 400bhp. The project was delayed in 1955, after the appalling accident at Le Mans involving Pierre Levegh and his Mercedes. But the engine was ready by June 1956, and mounted on the chassis of the 350 S driven by Stirling Moss in that year's Mille Miglia. Moss and Denis Jenkinson (race number 554) went off the road just before reaching Rome, while placed 5th. This chassis, made of large ovoid steel tubes topped by a superstructure of circular, small-diameter steel tubes, derived directly from that of the 300 S with its De Dion rear-axle. There was independent front suspension with superimposed triangles, telescopic shock-absorbers and coiled springs, while the De Dion rear-axle was supported by semi-elliptical leaf springs. The car showed its mettle - and shortcomings - at the 1956 Swedish Grand Prix on August 7. The 450 S was very rapid but its transmission, for which the specialist Colotti was responsible, proved temperamental. After Sweden the car was fitted with large-diameter drum brakes (400mm to the front, 300mm at the rear) and new, hand-mounted bodywork by Fantuzzi. Maserati had justifiable hopes for the 450 S in the 1957 championship. With Mercedes having withdrawn two years earlier, Ferrari remained the main threat with their sublime 315 S and 335 S - the most handsome open-top Ferraris ever made. The season began in Buenos Aires. After surging into the lead, the 450 S driven by Fangio and Moss broke its transmission on lap 58. But Fangio and Behra won the 12 Hours of Sebring in 450 S #4503, sending Maserati to the top of the championship. Moss and Jenkinson, the event record holders, were favourites for the 1957 Mille Miglia, this time in 450 S #4505 (Behra's #4503 collided with a lorry during practice). Like the 335 S Ferraris, the Maseratis topped 185mph down the lengthy straights alongside the Adriatic, and over the final stretch from Bologna to Brescia. Moss suffered brake failure less than 10 miles out; Scarlatti finished 3rd in a Maserati 300 S; Piero Taruffi won in a Ferrari 315 S, three minutes ahead of Wolfgang von Trips. Ferrari's victory was tainted with tragedy after the fatal crash involving Alfonso de Portago and co-driver Edmund Nelson in their Ferrari 335 S, some 25 miles from the finish. The Mille Miglia was never staged again. The 450 S Maseratis also suffered defeat at the Nürburgring on May 26, then at Le Mans, despite Fangio lapping at 125mph. Although Behra and Moss won in Sweden, Maserati's last chance to win the 1957 championship went up in smoke when all their cars had accidents during the final event of the season in Caracas. Ferrari took the World Sportscar Championship with 30 points, ahead of Maserati on 25. Even though Fangio had won the World Drivers' title in a Maserati 250 F, Adolfo Orsi hauled Maserati out of competitive racing. The Sportscar Championship was henceforth limited to 3-litre engines in Europe, and the 450 S cars ended their careers in the United States. The unused 450 S engines remained in the factory after the 1957 season. As Maserati had just launched serial production of the 3500 GT, Giulio Alfieri hit on the idea of marrying the two by mounting the fabulous V8 racing engine from the 450 S on to a reinforced 3500 GT chassis, clad in 'haute couture' bodywork commissioned from Touring. It is also claimed that - not content with his 'mere' 3500 GT - Rezza Pahlavi, the Shah of Iran and a connoisseur of exceptional cars, had ordered a special car with the formidable V8. Whether this is true or not, the Shah obtained the first 5000 GT to be built (#AM 103 002). The second, shown at the Turin Motor Show in 1959, was acquired by Basil Read (#AM 103 003). Rolf Helm acquired the third (#AM 103 004). These three cars were the only ones fitted with 450 S racing engines, which Alfieri gave a slightly larger bore of 98.5mm, up from 93.8mm, while keeping the same stroke of 81mm; cylinder capacity rose to 4937.8cc. The next cars had 94 x 89mm bore and stroke, and a slightly larger 4941.1cc displacement. The engines of the first three cars kept their 'racing' exhaust system and twin overhead camshafts with cascade pinion gearing, rather than the triple-chain used on subsequent 5000 GTs. The car presented here (#058), a Blu Sera Allemano coupé with its original Connolly black leather (ref. 154/4), was one of the last Maserati 5000 GTs to be built, and therefore has five-speed transmission and Lucas mechanical fuel injection. It has a superb Nardi three-spoke wooden steering-wheel; period radio; and electric windows. According to the excellent study by Luigi Orsini & Fanco Zagari, only 31 Maserati 5000 GTs were produced (without #103 002). Our car was delivered new in Barcelona at the start of 1964 by Auto Paris, Maserati's Spanish importers, to its first owner, José Bascones Ayreto; he sold it to Jean Guikas in December 1989. Guikas had it restored then consigned for sale with us here in Paris in December 1990. The engine was restored by Giulani, the injection revised, a new braking system installed, and the bodywork stripped and resprayed in its original Blu Sera livery (Fiat ref. 439) by Canisero of Marseille. Though little driven since 1990, the car - one of the star attractions at the Manoir de l'Automobile in Lohéac, Brittany - has been carefully maintained, and started up every month. Maserati are unable to say why #058 has been fitted with a different air intake pipe. We have found this very rare Maserati to be in a very good state of presentation and working-order. Now as before - if you need a Maserati, the exclusive 5000 GT is the one to have! Pictures copyright : Thomas594canalblog.com Estimation 260 000 - 320 000 € Sold for 255,282 €

  • FRAFrance
  • 2010-07-09
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A cased and factory engraved Colt 3rd Model Dragoon percussion revolver The Whitney Dragoon

A cased and factory engraved Colt 3rd Model Dragoon percussion revolver The Whitney Dragoon Serial no. 12405 (with a dot) for 1852, .44 caliber. 7 1/2 inch barrel marked Address Saml Colt New-York City within a dentate border. Barrel lug, loading lever lug and frame with fine 'donut' scroll engraving; left side of frame with hand engraved Colt's/Patent; hammer with scroll engraving and wolf's head. Blued, casehardened and silver-plated finish. Engraved screwheads. Cylinder with roll-engraved Dragoon and Indian scene and Model U.S.M.R. and Colt's Patent panels framing the serial number. Triggerguard engraved with leafage border, the bow scroll-engraved. Gripstrap with scroll engraved panels. Deluxe varnished walnut grips. Complete with original rose velour-lined mahogany case, the lid with brass corners. Partitioned interior contains sloping charger Army-style flask, two cavity brass mold with Colt's Patent-marked sprue cutter, the right side marked WAT, L-shaped combination tool, two packages of American Powder Company skin cartridges and an empty tin of Eley Brothers caps. Condition: Excellent. Barrel retains 98% dark blue finish showing some browning and light edge wear. Cylinder retains perhaps 50% blue showing sharp scene and markings and scattered minor scratches. Lug and rammer with generous traces of faded casehardening. Triggerguard/gripstraps retain 100% unpolished silver-plated finish. Grips with 100% varnish and showing scattered light marks. Case lid showing numerous light marks. Lining faded and showing areas of staining and wear. Accessories excellent. See Illustration

  • USAUSA
  • 2015-11-10
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1988 PORSCHE 959 EX BERNARD TAPIE

1988 PORSCHE 959 EX BERNARD TAPIE Châssis n° WPOZZZ95ZH89 00064 Vendue neuve en France, 2ème main, 6 100 km d'origine Exercice de style audacieux, destiné à la compétition comme à la route après développement adéquat, la 959 marqua les esprits lors de sa présentation sous la forme d'une future " groupe B " au Salon de Francfort 1983. Évolution extrême de la 911 du point de vue technologique, elle fut longue à mettre au point, car le centre d'études Porsche de Weissach n'hésita pas à mettre ses choix techniques à l'épreuve du désert au vu et au su de tous, notamment la transmission intégrale avec gestion électronique de la répartition du couple, le moteur à double turbo avec système de réduction du temps de réponse, la correction d'assiette automatique en fonction de la vitesse, le freinage à haute pression avec anti-blocage, pour ne citer que quelques éléments fondamentaux en cours de développement à l'époque. C'est en effet sur les pistes du rallye Paris-Dakar que la 959 roda ses systèmes mécaniques et électroniques avec des fortunes diverses : succès en 1984, désastre en 1985 et triomphe total en 1986. Cette très complexe voiture laboratoire fut donc commercialisée en 1987 après une rigoureuse et savante mise au point typique du comportement habituel du constructeur. Elle respectait les règlements sportifs applicables aux voitures du Groupe B, soit une production minimale de 200 exemplaires (une prouesse pour une machine aussi complexe) plus 20 voitures " évolution ". Les acheteurs qui s'étaient précipités dès 1984 pour verser l'acompte de 50 000 DM ne furent pas déçus, ni par le retard des livraisons (près de deux ans, mais Porsche sut toujours communiquer avec ses clients), ni par les prestations de la 959 dite de série : 315 km/h et 3,7 secondes de 0 à 100 km/h. Indéniablement de la famille 911, la 959 avait bénéficié d'une étude aérodynamique très soignée et le Cx avait été descendu de 0,39 (sur les modèles européens) à 0,31. Mais les recherches avaient porté principalement sur la réduction de la portance à haute vitesse et en accélération, une donnée fondamentale pour la maîtrise d'une voiture à moteur de 450 ch et 500 Nm de couple en porte-à-faux arrière, tradition oblige. Grâce à un ensemble de solutions nouvelles, appliquées aux suspensions et à l'aérodynamique du véhicule, la 959 affichait à 300 km/h une portance voisine de zéro. L'autre champ de recherche concerna la nécessaire répartition optimale du couple entre les trains avant et arrière en fonction de l'adhérence par l'intermédiaire d'embrayages multi disques à bain d'huile, dont la poussée était réglée par divers capteurs, un calculateur et un système hydraulique à haute pression. Cette répartition pouvait être automatique ou contrôlée manuellement. Porsche adopta aussi le système Denloc qui retient le pneu sur la jante en cas de crevaison ou de dégonflement car la voiture n'avait pas de roue de secours. On expérimenta aussi un système de contrôle permanent de la pression de gonflage. Côté moteur, si le classique six-cylindres à plat était naturellement conservé, il bénéficiait de solutions nouvelles, expérimentées aussi en endurance comme le refroidissement mixte (air pour les cylindres, liquide pour les culasses) qui fut ensuite généralisé. La géniale 959 mérite donc toute l'attention des amateurs de voitures emblématiques et de techniques de pointe pour avoir été à la fois un aboutissement et la source des fantastiques progrès appliqués aux Porsche au cours des années suivantes, progrès qui ont permis à la 911 de poursuivre une carrière sportive et commerciale au sommet en éteignant peu à peu des critiques parfois justifiées sans renier un style et une architecture qui ont assuré sa gloire ad vitam aeternam. Bernard Tapie achète neuve cette supercar à Paris le 29 avril 1988, chez Pierre Landereau, concessionnaire à l'époque, et la garde jusqu'en 1998. Elle est alors rachetée par Pierre Landereau qui l'inscrit dans une vente de Me Poulain au début de cette même année. La 959 est adjugée au propriétaire actuel, qui la confie pour une révision totale à Porsche-Cergy Pontoise et à Sonauto pour l'entretien courant. Elle compte aujourd'hui 6 100 kilomètres depuis sa sortie d'usine. Elle est de couleur gris argent, intérieur gris avec dégradé sur les sièges, typique des années 1980. Inutile de préciser qu'elle se trouve dans un état proche du neuf. Elle se présente donc dans une condition optimale, prête à être utilisée en ville, comme sur autoroute, tant ce modèle est polyvalent, à la fois facile à conduire et envoûtant à piloter avec son double turbo au souffle musical qui vous colle littéralement au siège à la première sollicitation de l'accélérateur. Carte grise française sold new in France, second-hand, 3,800 miles With its stylistic audacity the 959 - ultimately destined for both racing and road-driving - caught the eye at the 1983 Frankfurt Motor Show, where it was presented as a future 'Group B.' It was the most advanced evolution of the 911 from a technological point of view, and had taken a long time to perfect; the Porsche study centre in Weissach had no qualms about testing it in public, choosing desert conditions to assess its technical capabilities - notably the integral transmission with electronically managed torque distribution; twin-turbocharged engine with system for reducing response time; automatic load levelling according to speed; and high-pressure braking with ABS… to mention just some of the aspects under development at the time. The 959's mechanical and electronic systems were tried out on the Paris-Dakar, with varying results: success in 1984, disaster in 1985, total triumph in 1986. This highly complex laboratory car went on sale in 1987 after a rigorous, scientific development period, typical of Porsche's approach. It conformed to competition regulations for Group B cars, i.e. a minimum production of 200 (quite a challenge for such a complex machine) plus 20 'evolution' cars. Buyers who had rushed to pay their DM50,000 deposit back in 1984 were not disappointed - either by the delay (nearly two years, but Porsche have always known how to communicate with their clients), or by the performances of the 'serial' 959: a top speed of 197mph and 0-60mph inside 3.7 seconds. The 959 was undeniably an offspring of the 911, and had benefited from detailed aerodynamic studies, leading to a drop in Cx from 0.39 (on its European models) to 0.31. But research had mainly involved reducing the load-bearing capacity at high speed and during acceleration - a fundamental aspect for mastering a car with a 450bhp engine within its rear-overhang, and torque of 500 Nm. Thanks to a range of new solutions applicable to the car's suspension and aerodynamics, the 959 had a load-bearing capacity close to zero at 190mph. The other field of research necessarily concerned the optimal distribution of torque between the front and back axle-units depending on traction, using multiple-discs in oil bath clutches, with thrust controlled by a variety of captors, a calculator and a high-pressure hydraulic system. This distribution could be controlled automatically or manually. As the car had no spare wheel, Porsche also adopted the Denloc system, preventing the tyre from leaving the rim when deflated. Porsche also experimented with a permanent tyre-pressure control system. The classic six-cylinder flat-engine was naturally retained, albeit with such novel developments (also tested in endurance events) as mixed cooling (air for the cylinders, liquid for the cylinder-heads), which was subsequently widely adopted. The inspired 959 fully deserves the attention of connoisseurs of iconic cars and cutting-edge technology. It is a culmination, and source, of Porsche's fantastic progress over the years, enabling the 911 to enjoy an outstanding career in terms of both sales and sporting results, gradually dispelling (sometimes justified) criticism without refuting a style and architecture that have ensured its lasting glory. Bernard Tapie bought this supercar from dealer Pierre Landereau in Paris on 29 April 1988, and kept it until 1998, when it was bought back by Pierre Landereau and sold at auction by Hervé Poulain. Its current owner had the car fully serviced by Porsche in Cergy-Pontoise, with maintenance carried out by Sonauto. The car has covered 3,810 miles since leaving the factory. It is silver grey in colour, with a grey-shaded interior typical of the 1980s. Needless to say, it remains in near-new condition, ready for driving in the city and on the motorway. This versatile car is both easy and pleasing to drive, and its musical twin-turbo literally scotches you to your seat the moment your foot touches the accelerator. French registration "carte grise" Estimation 180 000 - 200 000 € Sold for 230,651 €

  • FRAFrance
  • 2010-07-09
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A factory engraved and silver-banded Colt 'Texas' Paterson No. 5 Holster Model percussion revolver

A factory engraved and silver-banded Colt 'Texas' Paterson No. 5 Holster Model percussion revolver Serial no. 98- (third number partially obliterated but it appears to be a 4, .36 caliber. Rare 6 inch barrel inlaid with six silver bands, fitted with silver fore-sight and marked Patent Arms Mfg. Co. Paterson N.J.-Colt's Pt.; muzzle engraved with stiff leaf band, the lug engraved with vine and leaf scrollwork. Cylinder numbered 984, roll-engraved with stagecoach holdup scene and inlaid with two silver bands. Frame engraved with scrollwork and with a repeating band of leafage under the cylinder; recoil shield inlaid with two silver bands. Backstrap with scrollwork panels and set with vacant silver escutcheon. Original elephant ivory grips framed in silver and carved with shell panels. Together with a large portfolio of provenance which includes copies or photopies of most of the publications this revolver has been illustrated in as well as a black and white postcard/advertisement from Weston's Mexican Art Shop dated Sept. 7, 1940. Condition: Fine. Barrel with much of the dark blue finish remaining on the underside, the balance with areas of thin blue finish and grey/brown patina. Cylinder with traces of blue on the rear portion, the balance with grey metal showing some light pitting and clear scene. Frame and gripstrap with smooth grey metal showing sharp engraving and areas of blue finish remaining on the rear of the recoil shield and on the apron of the gripstrap. Grips with some chipping to toes and to right side at lower frame juncture. See Illustration

  • USAUSA
  • 2014-11-11
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1845 $5 Ultra Cameo PF-66 NGC

1845 $5 Ultra Cameo PF-66 NGC Christian Gobrecht, designer and engraver Obverse: Head of Liberty facing left, her hair in an elaborate chignon, wearing a coronet on which LIBERTY is emblazoned; around, thirteen stars; below, 1845. Reverse: Displayed eagle, head facing left, with shield emblazoned on its chest holding olive branch and three arrows in its talons; around, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA; below, FIVE D. Condition: NGC Proof 66 Ultra Cameo (Certificate number: 1963267-002 – Photo Proof 10-07). A deeply struck example, so fresh that raised die polish lines (as made) can still be seen under magnification. With rich orange-peel surfaces, deep mirroring and spectacular contrast. A few scattered mint-caused planchet flecks in the reverse field, and a toning spot in the reverse dentils between the F and I help serve to identify this superb example. References: This Coin Published: Breen (Encyclopedia) 6555, 4; Garrett & Guth (Encyclopedia) p. 289. Other references: Breen (Proofs) p. 81; Akers (1979) p. 126. (PCGS 98435) Condition Census: The finest known. NGC lists another far inferior example and PCGS lists two examples (Proof 65 deep cameo, the finest). Based on the known number of surviving specimens in private hands (2), the four listings in both reports combined clearly represent re-submissions. (07-13) Rarity: Of the highest rarity. Breen (Proofs) cited three examples but erroneously listed the example in Pittman's ("NY State Specialist") set twice; in his Encyclopedia, Breen repeated the error, and added the example from the set found in England and sold at Bowers and Ruddy in 1979 (the present coin); Akers (1979) cited "three or four" but in his 1998 catalogue of the Pittman collection, he was only able to confirm the existence of three examples; Garrett and Guth suggest four to five, but there is no confirmation of more than three. The roster includes: the National Coin Collection; the present coin, formerly in the Ed Trompeter Collection (and unknown prior to 1979); and the (lesser quality) John J. Pittman example which was part of a three-piece gold proof set. Akers noted only one appearance of an 1845 proof half eagle in his comprehensive analysis of auction catalogues. That coin appeared as part of the Memorable Collection in 1948 and reappeared as part of a set in the Pittman collection sale in 1998. With the exception of the four previous auction appearances of the presently offered coin (since its discovery in 1979), no other 1845 proof half eagle has appeared at auction in nearly a century. Provenance: Bowers and Merena, Baltimore Auction, July 8, 2004, lot 3070, PR 66 Ultra Cameo NGC ($149,500); Ed Trompeter [Dennis Mendelson Collection Auction], Superior, February 2-3, 1991, lot 2596; Auction '84 (Paramount), July 25-26, 1984, lot 906, Gem Proof 65 ($35,750); Paul D. Williams Collection Sale, Bowers and Ruddy, September, 27-29, 1979, lot 1816 (as part of an original three-piece gold proof set that "reposed in a bank vault in England for more than a century"). Note: The half eagle was very much one of the true working denominations issued by the United States government. No other gold denomination had such a long production run. Beginning in 1795 and continuing until 1929, it was effectively produced without interruption until 1916, and there were only a very few years that saw none produced (two years in the nineteenth century). This continuity, liberally laced with some major rarities, has made it one of the most popular and challenging denominations to collect. The earliest Proof examples of Gobrecht's half eagle design were struck in extremely small amounts. The specific number struck between their introduction in 1839 and 1858 (when the Mint began to strike proofs in greater quantities for sale to the public) is unknown, but the number of survivors from this eighteen year period is minuscule. Garrett and Guth estimated a survival of about thirty pieces of all dates. Based on the combined PCGS and NGC population reports, no other proof half eagle of any date struck during this period is of superior quality to the Tacasyl coin, and that includes the Smithsonian's specimens. As discussed elsewhere, proof sets produced during this period were intended for presentation and while the specific reasons are essentially unknown, in 1845 such celebratory occasions might include the admission of Florida to the Union in March; James Polk's inauguration the same month; the opening of the Naval Academy in Annapolis in October; or Texas's admission as the twenty-eighth state in December. (For the 1845 proof quarter eagle and eagle in this sale, see lots 1003 and 1017.)

  • USAUSA
  • 2013-09-24
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WATSON, James D. “The Involvement of RNA in the Synthesis of Proteins.” Original Holograph Manuscript for Watson’s Nobel Lecture delivered on December

WATSON, James D. “The Involvement of RNA in the Synthesis of Proteins.” Original Holograph Manuscript for Watson’s Nobel Lecture delivered on December 11, 1962. 46 pp., 4to in blue ink on rectos only. On 30 October 1962, Crick wrote to Watson explaining that the celebratory party in Cambridge had gone well. In the same letter (see p. 36), Crick discusses the Nobel Lectures, proposing that Wilkins deals with the structure, Watson discusses RNA and Crick covers the genetic code: “This is mainly to discuss the question of the prize lectures, as we have to divide the subject between us. I feel that Maurice should deal with the actual structure. Personally I am against anything in the way of a historical account of the work. Actually the citation includes ‘its significance for information transfer’. Do you think that you should talk about messenger RNA, and that I should discuss the acridine mutants and the light they shed on the code? I feel it would be foolish to include mechanism of DNA replication as Kornberg covered that. However, I expect you have your own ideas… Odile and Michael and the two little girls are all coming. The program looks very strenuous, but I’m told it’s all quite fun. Yours ever, Francis.” “My forthcoming Nobel address soon preoccupied me at Harvard. Maurice was to give his talk on his King’s College lab work confirming the double helix; Francis would focus on the genetic code; and I would talk about the involvement of RNA in protein synthesis. Happily, my Harvard science of the past five years was equal to a Nobel lecture. By then I had bought the necessary white-tie outfit at the Cambridge branch of J. Press, whose first shop in New Haven had long been purveyor par excellence of preppy clothing to Yale’s undergraduates. Soon after coming to Harvard, I had begun getting my suits at their Mt. Auburn Street store, finding their clothes to be among the few available that ft my still-skinny frame. Perhaps sensing my high spirits, the salesman easily persuaded me also to purchase for the august occasion a black cloth coat with a fur collar.” —James D. Watson, The Annotated and Illustrated Double Helix, edited by Alexander Gann and Jan Witkowski, Cold Spring Harbor, 2012, p. 248. This lot comprises James Watson’s archive for his Nobel Lecture delivered in Stockholm on December 11, 1962, and includes: a manuscript outline for the Lecture, his 46-page holograph manuscript, a two-page holograph draft of the “Legends to Figures” used to caption the illustrations in the paper (along with a typed version with annotations), four corrected typed or carbon drafts of the Lecture, a mimeographed copy (blue wrappers), and a copy of the published offprint of the Paper. With an unsigned typed carbon of a letter sent from JDW to Nils K. Stahle, Director of the Nobel Foundation, submitting a revised version of the Lecture. 13 February 1963. One page, 4to. As Watson’s papers are in the archives of Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory ANY SIGNIFICANT SCIENTIFIC MANUSCRIPT BY THE CO-DISCOVERER OF THE STRUCTURE OF DNA IS EXCEEDINGLY SCARCE IN THE MARKET—THERE IS NO RECORD OF ANY SCIENTIFIC MANUSCRIPT BY JAMES WATSON EVER OFFERED AT AUCTION, NOR IS THERE LIKELY TO BE IN THE FUTURE.

  • USAUSA
  • 2014-12-04
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1879 $4 Stella Flowing Hair Cameo PF-67 NGC

1879 $4 Stella Flowing Hair Cameo PF-67 NGC Charles E. Barber, designer Obverse: Head of Liberty facing left, wearing diadem inscribed LIBERTY, her hair flowing in long locks; around, ★6★G★.3★S★.7★C★7★G★R★A★M★S★; below, 1879. Reverse: Large five-pointed star inscribed in incuse: ONE / STELLA / — / 400 / CENTS, in five lines; around outer rim: UNITED STATES OF AMERICA — FOUR DOL.; around, within outer legend: E – PLURIBUS – UNUM — DEO – EST – GLORIA. Condition: NGC Proof 67 Cameo (Certificate number: 1963260-001 – Photo Proof 10-07; previous Photo Proof 04-05 [number: 115855-001]). A pale golden hue, with a faint milky cloudiness over superbly frosted devices which contrast starkly against the mirrored fields. Two tiny impressions on Liberty's neck and small marks at the top of the star serve as identifiers of this exceptional example. References: Judd 1635; Pollock 1832; Breen (Encyclopedia) 6407/6408; Breen (Proofs) p.164; Akers (1976) pp. 80-81; Akers (Patterns) p. 51, 103-104; Garrett and Guth (Encyclopedia) p. 170; Garrett and Guth, 100 Greatest U.S. Coins. (PCGS 88057) Condition Census: One of the finest known. NGC records ten coins as Proof 67 Cameo including three bearing the star designation (as well as two Ultra Cameo), and a single coin graded Proof 68. (When the earlier Photo Proof for this specimen was prepared in April 2005 [see above], NGC noted only six examples of equal grade to the presently offered coin, and nothing finer was cited). PCGS records four examples as Proof 67 Cameo, and one Deep Cameo. (07-13) Rarity: Very rare. Although 15 originals and 425 official restrikes were reportedly produced, a substantial number were used as jewelry or pocket pieces. Determining the difference between originals (which are supposed to be un-striated) and restrikes has confounded numismatists for years. As noted from the above census the number of Superb Gem quality Flowing Hair Stellas is remarkably small with only a dozen or so of the quality of this example. According to the PCGS data base of Auction Prices, this example when sold at auction in January 2005 realized, by a substantial margin, a record amount for the variety and was, at that time, included among the 250 all-time top auction prices for U.S. coins as recorded in the 2007 edition of A Guide Book of United States Coins [The Red Book], and it was still on the list in the 2009 edition. Provenance: Gold Rush Collection, Heritage, January 12, 2005, lot 30042, Proof 67 Cameo NGC, "a simply glorious specimen... magnificent." ($310,500) Note: Although the Stella is undoubtedly America's best known physical manifestation of an international currency, the idea of coinages which were of equivalent value and convertible in other countries was not new. According to a recent article, in 1855 Professor John H. Alexander published a pamphlet on an international coinage for the United States and Great Britain. The concept was to have the sovereign and half eagle of equal gold content and value. The idea reached the halls of Congress, which subsidized an exploratory trip to Great Britain for the professor, but following Alexander's report the program failed to win support. In Europe, the Latin Union was formed in 1865 and seven countries agreed to adopt the French currency system. The members of the Union would produce coins of a national character, but their value and underlying gold content would be based on the French franc. In Paris, two years later at an International Monetary Conference it was agreed (in principal) that all conferees would adopt a similar system, but in subsequent debates the system, largely on nationalistic grounds, was defeated. France's defeat in the Franco-Prussian War ended enthusiasm for the idea until 1878, when a second conference was held, again in Paris, at the urging of the United States. This time it was an international bimetallic standard that was proposed and it was as a result of this second conference that the Stellas were developed, largely at the urging of John Kasson, the United States Minister to Austria. With Congressional approval and the support of the Secretary of State, the Mint was ordered to develop a coin which could not only circulate around the world, be recognized as an international coin, but also indicate its value in a similarly multi-national way. The Mint's solution to all of its charges was common sense: the value of the coin was expressed not only in dollars (Four), but in the metallic composition of the coin itself; 6 grams gold; .3 grams silver; .7 grams copper. To achieve this alloy, the Philadelphia Mint's assay shop simply mixed the correct proportions. Finally, to create an odd sized planchet, half eagle blanks were adjusted (probably by hand, as the striations vary from one example to another) to the correct weight. When completed, the newly struck patterns were forwarded on to the Coinage Committee in Congress for approval. Word of their unusual design and beauty quickly made the Washington, D.C. rounds and additional examples of the 1879 Flowing Hair variety were struck to satisfy Congressional demand. Ultimately though, like earlier efforts to create international coinage, legislators scuttled the plan, but not before creating one of the United States' most sought-after collector coins.

  • USAUSA
  • 2013-09-24
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An important and historic figural hilt presentation sword given to Major General Ambrose E. Burnside by the United States Sanitary Commission

An important and historic figural hilt presentation sword given to Major General Ambrose E. Burnside by the United States Sanitary Commission New York Metropolitan Fair, April 22, 1864 Straight 33 1/2 inch fullered blade, the 21 inch gilt lower section with etched and engraved panels in-the-white; one side with scrollwork and panoplies of arms and banners flanking an extensive battle scene; the other with scrollwork and panoplies, U.S. and Federal eagle with E Pluribus Unum riband. Gilt spine etched with meander and marked Iron Proof. Ricasso marked Clauberg with his mark on one side and Schuyler, Hartley/& Graham/New York on the reverse. Gilt bronze hilt comprising: large, downcurving shell finely molded with a wharf scene featuring a brick lighthouse, sailing ships and a steam ship, all above an E Pluribus Unum riband and laurel wreath and enclosed at the sides by sheafs and above with an anchor and two dolphins in full relief, reverse of shell engraved F. Delacour & Backes/a Paris; quillon block molded with foliage, the front with vacant escutcheon surmounted by an embattled tower, the back with escutcheon engraved with the General's monogram AEB; knucklebow with the central figure of a merbaby, the lower section entwined by his bifurcated tail, the upper section with rope; pommel molded with scrolls, the front with Federal shield, the whole surmounted by an embattled tower; figural hilt, an allegorical group of three maidens in neo-classical dress, one holding a caduceus, the second a sheaf of wheat and the third with a dolphin to one side and a tiller or oar to the other; at their feet a dolphin. Silvered scabbard, the pierced, gilt brass mounts molded with scrollwork and panoplies of arms a la antique and engraved with presentation panel Presented to/Major Genl A.E. Burnside/by his friends through the/Metropoliton (sic) Fair/in aid of the/United States Sanitary Commission/New York, April 22nd 1864/'By Courage and Faith'." Condition: Excellent. Blade showing some scattered minor spotting and light wear to gilding at ricasso. Hilt and scabbard mounts excellent and retaining much of the gilt finish, the quillon missing. See Illustration

  • USAUSA
  • 2012-06-12
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1845 $2.5 PF-67â605 Cameo NGC

1845 $2.5 PF-67★ Cameo NGC Christian Gobrecht, designer and engraver Obverse: Head of Liberty facing left, her hair in an elaborate chignon with long curls trailing down her neck, wearing a coronet on which LIBERTY is emblazoned; around, thirteen stars; below, 1845. Reverse: Displayed eagle, head facing left, with shield emblazoned on its chest holding olive branch and three arrows in its talons; around, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA; below, 2½ D. Condition: NGC Proof 67★ Cameo (Certificate number: 1963267-001 - Photo Proof 10-07; previous Photo Proof 07-05 [number: 1727697-001] ). A spectacular, full strike, with all details fully delineated; a tiny lint mark at the tenth star, and an insignificant (mint-caused) planchet 'dimple' between the twelfth and thirteenth stars are identifiers. A rich medium red-gold; soft deeply reflective surfaces and a few raised die polish lines accentuate the freshness of this exceptional coin. References: This Coin Published: Breen (Encyclopedia) 6177 (2 & 3); Breen (Proofs) p. 81 (2 & 3); Garrett & Guth (Encyclopedia) p. 117 (cited as part of the Pittman set); this coin used to illustrate the date on the NGC Coin Explorer site. Other references: Akers (1975) p. 67. (PCGS 87871) Condition Census: Probably the finest known. According to NGC this is the only example graded Proof 67 with the Cameo ★ designation. Another example graded NGC Proof 67 Ultra Cameo was sold in August 2012 as "finest known." However, the currently offered Tacasyl coin was described in the July 2005 NGC Photo Proof that accompanies the lot as, "This astounding gem is the finer of just two pieces certified by NGC." The 2012 Heritage catalogue description of the recently sold example (lot 5305) notes that although "Currently graded PR67 Ultra Cameo NGC" in its previous "past two auction appearances" in 2004 and 2006 it was graded "PR 66 Ultra Cameo NGC." PCGS records no specimens at this grade (Proof 65 Deep Cameo, the finest). (07-13) Rarity: Exceptionally rare. Breen cited three examples (including this specimen) with a fourth rumored; Akers (1975) cited "two or three," but in his 1998 catalogue of the Pittman collection, he confirmed the existence of three and guessed at the existence of a fourth; Garrett and Guth suggest as many as five many exist, but there is no confirmation of more than three. The roster includes: the National Coin Collection; the example formerly in the Ed Trompeter Collection; and this coin, formerly the John J. Pittman example which was part of a three-piece gold proof set. Despite the recent (August, 2012) suggestion in the catalogue offering the former Trompeter example of up to four to five survivors, the empirical evidence suggests that apart from the Smithsonian example, there are only two confirmed examples. For the Half Eagle and Eagle from this set see lots 1013, 1017. Provenance: Carl A. Minning, Jr. Collection Sale, Bowers and Merena, August 31, 1999, lot 2149, PR 65 NGC; John Jay Pittman Collection, Part Two, David Akers Numismatics, Inc., May 20-21, 1998, lot 1711 (part); "A Memorable Collection" [Jacob Shapiro/J.F. Bell], Numismatic Galleries [Abe Kosoff and Abner Kreisberg], March 1-2, 1948, lot 347 ($160); Colonel Edward Howland Robinson Green, Stack's (via private placement), circa December 31, 1943/January 10, 1944; possibly (per Breen [Proofs]) ex Burdette G. Johnson (circa 1931), Waldo G. Newcomer (circa 1911), William H. Woodin, Lorin G. Parmelee. Note: This design, by Christian Gobrecht was first issued for the quarter eagle in 1840 and would remain essentially unchanged for nearly seventy years. There was some tinkering with the reverse lettering and minor design details begun in 1859, but the small diameter prevented the addition of the motto IN GOD WE TRUST to the coin in 1866 which would have hopelessly cluttered the reverse design. Gobrecht's coronet head design may be considered the start of 'modern' United States gold coinage. The major features were completely hubbed (largely in an effort to prevent counterfeiting) and only the dates and mintmarks were punched by hand. This streamlined the production process and minimized the number of variants which the earlier issues display. Proof coins of this early date, particularly in gold, have been called "Master coins" and were not produced for sale to the general public as in later years. Although specific documents relating to the production of the special issues are lost (or, at least have yet to be located in the National Archives) it is almost certain that they were produced exclusively for some official presentation or commemorative purpose.

  • USAUSA
  • 2013-09-24
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A cased engraved and silver banded Colt 'Baby' Paterson Model No. 1 percussion revolver

A cased engraved and silver banded Colt 'Baby' Paterson Model No. 1 percussion revolver Serial no. 98, .28 caliber. 1 3/4 inch blued and scroll-engraved barrel inlaid with four silver bands. Blued and round-shouldered cylinder roll-engraved with centaur scene. Blued and scroll-engraved recoil shields inlaid with two silver bands. Casehardened and scroll-engraved frame, the underside flare engraved with a dog framed by scrollwork below a partial sun-in-splendor. Blued and scroll-engraved gripstrap with vacant silver escutcheon. Mother-of-pearl grips. Together with associated period Paterson case with beveled lid and purple velour lining. Accessories include fine charger flask numbered 39, extra cylinder numbered 1233, blued bullet mold, blued combination tool, cleaning rod and reproduction capper. Condition: Excellent as configured. Barrel shortened and showing traces of barrel address through old refinish. (See Note) Cylinder retains 90% plus period refinish with sharp scene and one area of pitting. Bolsters and gripstrap retain 95% original blue showing scattered marks and light spotting. Frame with grey metal showing sharp engraving and some slight traces of faded casehardening. Grips with some minor chipping and possibly replaced. Case exterior with light marks. Accessories fine to excellent. See Illustration

  • USAUSA
  • 2014-11-11
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A MAGNIFICENT PAIR OF 20-BORE SILVER-MOUNTED FLINTLOCK PISTOLS

A MAGNIFICENT PAIR OF 20-BORE SILVER-MOUNTED FLINTLOCK PISTOLS BY HENRY HADLEY, LONDON, CIRCA 1765 With two-stage barrels in the Spanish manner, each retaining their original deeply blued finish and with gold spider fore-sight and gilt girdle, the breeches each inlaid with numerous decorative gold marks with three parallel gold lines at the rear and large gold lining around each touch-hole, the top flat with Hadley's own two gold-lined stamps in the Spanish fashion, grooved tangs finely engraved with flowers, foliage, birds, musical instruments and a grotesque mask, all on a matted ground, flat locks each signed on the lower moulded border and finely engraved with an elaborate panoply of arms, flowers and foliage, also on a matted ground, large engraved safety-catches, gold-lined pans and steels, highly figured walnut full stocks finely carved with rococo ornament in relief at the barrel tangs, and inlaid with rococo designs in silver wire, dots, and engraved silver plaques, full silver mounts of the highest quality cast and chased in high relief with martial trophies involving figures of Victory and Britannia, the escutcheons engraved with the arms of Clerk of Penicuik (Scotland), set triggers, finely engraved turned ramrod-pipes, and original silver-mounted ramrods, the head of one forming a powder-measure, the external screws (other than the jaw screws) each with squared recess in the head, both pistols preserved in exceptional original condition throughout, London proof marks and Foreigner's mark 17in. (43.2cm.) (2)

  • GBRGrande Bretagne
  • 1996-03-27
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1962 PORSCHE 356 CARRERA 2/GS 2000

1962 PORSCHE 356 CARRERA 2/GS 2000 Châssis n° 121434 (01) Moteur 97095 Quatre ans après les humbles débuts de la marque en Autriche, la direction de Porsche franchit une étape importante en prenant la décision de créer un nouveau moteur susceptible de faire oublier le groupe à culbuteurs de la modeste Volkswagen. Il était temps en effet d'exploiter les qualités de la 356, brillante au Mans, à la Mille Miglia, et dans nombre d'épreuves routières, dont la mécanique avouait ses limites. Un homme fut l'artisan de cette métamorphose voulue par Ferry Porsche : Ernst Fuhrmann, jeune ingénieur motoriste qui avait travaillé sur le moteur de la Cisitalia de Grand Prix de 1947. Fuhrmann (33 ans en 1952) allait signer un chef-d'œuvre de mécanique, le quatre-cylindres à 4 ACT type 547, essayé au banc en 1953. De ce groupe étudié pour la course, Fuhrmann dériva une version route qui équipa un type de production au nom devenu légendaire : la Carrera. Le premier moteur désigné 1500 GS donna aussitôt 100 ch et imposa la 356 dans le Rallye Liège-Rome-Liège 1954. La Carrera 1500 GS qui devait être produite à 100 exemplaires pour l'homologation en Grand Tourisme de série éveilla l'intérêt des sportifs amateurs de conduite sportive. Finalement, 700 voitures sortirent jusqu'en 1960 en deux versions : la Carrera De Luxe, la routière, et la Carrera GT avec 110 ch pour la compétition. Une deuxième série de Carrera apparut au Salon de Francfort 1961, dotée cette fois d'un moteur " quatre arbres " porté à deux litres, le type 587 ou GS 2000, donnant de série 130 ch à 6 200 tr/min. Malgré une progression du poids, la Carrera 2 se montra plus rapide : 200 km/h au moins et moins de 9 secondes de 0 à 100 km/h. Au total, Porsche produisit 310 modèles 356 B Carrera 2 et 126 modèles 356 C. Le type marque l'apogée de la 356 alors que sa remplaçante, la 911, venait d'être dévoilée. La voiture présentée, une 356 B Carrera 2/GS 2000, livrée neuve en Suisse le 4 septembre 1962 peinte en rouge rubis, connut trois propriétaires suisses. Son compteur affichait 49000 km fin 1966. Conservée dans la famille du troisième propriétaire jusqu'en 2004, elle fut acquise par le négociant Christophe Grohe qui la céda à un marchand californien, le garage Heritage Classics où le propriétaire actuel l'acheta en novembre 2004. La voiture arriva en Belgique en mars 2005 pour bénéficier d'une restauration totale : démontage complet avec élimination des matériaux insonorisants et isolants fortement dégradés, changement du plancher et de la partie avant, renforcement et allègement de la plate-forme pour pose d'un arceau de sécurité aux normes FIA actuelles, pose d'un isolant allégé. Les freins à disque Porsche d'origine remis à neuf s'étant révélés inefficaces, la voiture fut équipée de freins de 911 de 1965. Rouge à l'origine et repeinte en gris métallisé par un précédent propriétaire, cette Carrera est maintenant bleu nuit, une teinte optionnelle d'époque. Le moteur refait et préparé chez Derkum en Allemagne développe actuellement 165 ch DIN. Il est d'origine comme la transmission. La voiture équipée d'un autre moteur préparé a participé à la Carrera Panamericana au Mexique en 2007 (abandon après la 2e spéciale). Le moteur d'origine remis à neuf a été remonté. Elle est accompagnée de ses équipements d'origine déposés : sièges, chauffage à essence (option d'époque) et quatre freins à disque Porsche 356 remis à neuf ainsi que de documents provenant des anciens propriétaires, de son manuel d'utilisateur avec annexe relatif à la Carrera 2, d'un nuancier, etc. Prête pour les plus prestigieuses épreuves historiques, cette 356 Carrera 2 ne peut qu'enthousiasmer les amateurs de pilotage. Titre de circulation belge Passeport technique FIA/Classe GTS 11/1962-1965 Four years after Porsche's modest Austrian beginnings, its management took an important step in deciding to create a new engine able to steal the limelight from the humble Volkswagen. It was time to exploit the qualities of the 356, which had performed brilliantly at Le Mans, in the Mille Miglia, and in various other road races, but which was starting to show its mechanical limitations. One man responded to Ferry Porsche's call for a metamorphosis: Ernst Fuhrmann, a young motoring engineer who had worked on the engine of the Cisitalia Grand Prix of 1947. Fuhrmann, aged 33 in 1952, came up with a mechanical tour de force: the four-cylindered 547 engine. It was designed for racing, but Fuhrmann also used it as the basis for a roadcar version - a production type with the now-legendary name of Carrera. The first GS 1500 engine, immediately yielding 100bhp, helped the 356 to victory in the 1954 Liège-Rome-Liège. The Carrera GS 1500, which needed a production of 100 units for homologation in the Gran Turismo series, soon caught the imagination of car lovers. Some 700 were produced by 1960, in two versions: the Carrera De Luxe, a road car, and the Carrera GT 110bhp racing car. A second Carrera series was presented at the Frankfurt Motor Show in 1961, this time with a 'four-camshaft' engine increased in size to 2 litres: the Type 587 engine, or 2000 GS, yielding 130bhp at 6200rpm. Despite its extra weight, the Carrera 2 was faster: it could top 125mph, and accelerate from 0-60mph in under 9 seconds. In all, Porsche produced 310 Carrera 2 356 B models and 126 Carrera 2 356 C models. The Type 587 marked the apogee of the 356 at a time when its replacement, the 911, had only just been unveiled. Our car, a ruby red 356 B Carrera 2/ 2000 GS, was delivered new in Switzerland on 4 September 1962, and has had three Swiss owners. It had clocked up 30,600 miles by the end of 1966, and was kept in the family of its third owner until 2004, when it was acquired by the dealer Christophe Grohe, who sold it to the Heritage Classics garage in California, where the current owner bought it in November 2004. The car arrived in Belgium in March 2005 for a complete overhaul: it was taken apart and all the badly damaged sound-proofing and isolating material removed; the floor and front were changed; the chassis strengthened and lightened, and a roll-bar installed in line with current FIA norms; and lighter insulating fitted. As the original Porsche disc brakes had proved inefficient, despite being restored as new, brakes from a 911 made in 1965 were fitted instead. Our Carrera was originally red, resprayed metallic grey by a previous owner, and is now midnight blue (an optional shade at the time it was made). The engine, repaired and tuned at Derkum in Germany, currently develops 165bhp DIN; and, like the transmission, it is original. Fitted with a different engine, the car took part in the Carrera Panamericana in Mexico in 2007 (it pulled out after the 2nd stage). The original engine, restored as new, was subsequently re-mounted. It comes with its original patented fittings and accessories such as seats, four Porsche 356 disc brakes restored as new, documents from former owners, user's manual (with appendix concerning the Carrera 2), colour chart, etc. This 356 Carrera 2 is ready and rarin' to take part in vintage events, to the delight of racing enthusiasts. Belgian registration FIA technical passport: Class GTS 11/ 1962-65 Estimation 160 000 - 200 000 € Sold for 188,106 €

  • FRAFrance
  • 2010-07-09
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Médailles, armes & armures

Si vous êtes intéressé par les médailles et les décorations militaires, cette catégorie de vente aux enchères est faite pour vous. Vous y trouverez des armes historiques et modernes tels que des fusils, des couteaux et des pistolets, ainsi que des armures anciennes, des épées, des armes d'apparat ou des fusils à silex.