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Tiffany Studios Cobweb Table Lamp

Tiffany Studios Cobweb Table Lamp. Also known today in the Tiffany market parlance as a 'Spiderweb', this model was introduced around 1900, at the latest in 1901. Designed for combustion fuels, the first examples contained canisters within their baluster bases. To disguise the heavy visual effect that this entailed, a floral pattern rendered in mosaic tiles was added. When the design was modified some years later for electrification, as in this example, the wick and glass chimney were replaced by a 3-light cluster unit. Priced in 1906 at $500, from its inception the Cobweb was an extremely costly work of art that, ipso facto. targeted the firm's wealthiest patrician clients. It has remained amongst the most aesthetically desirable (and costly) models in Tiffany's lamp repertoire, both for the successful integration of it's shade and base, and for the virtuoso level of its handcraftsmanship. Of the seven known examples of this model this lamp is universally acknowledged to be the best in coloration, glass selection and condition. Shade: unsigned. Base: impressed TIFFANY STUDIOS NEW YORK Height: 30 1/4 inches. Diameter of shade: 19 inches. 1906 Price List: Model #146, Mosaic floral base, Cobweb shade, $500. This lamp is pictured on pgs. 311 of "Louis C. Tiffany, The Garden Museum Collection"; as well as pg. 111 (Fig 47) of "Masterworks of Louis Comfort Tiffany", Duncan, 1989. Exhibition History: Masterworks of Louis Comfort Tiffany, the Renwick Gallery. Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C.. September 29, 1989- March 4, 1990: and the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York. April 12 - September 9, 1990: Masterworks of Louis Comfort Tiffany, Japanese travelling exhibition (Tokyo, Kobe, Nagoya, and Toyama). January - August 1991.Provenance: Jeffrey Thier; Jack and Harriet Stievelman; The Garden Museum Collection, Matsue, Japan Estimate Upon Request.

  • USAUSA
  • 2012-11-17
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An Important “Trumpet Creeper” Table Lamp

With a "Tree" base Underside of shade mounting post impressed 28277 and 11mounting pin on shade impressed 11top of base column impressed 11base plate impressed TIFFANY STUDIOS/NEW YORK/28277 and 11underside of perimeter base cushion impressed 11 Louis C. Tiffany was enamored with creeping vines and they played a major role in the landscaping of his two Long Island mansions, The Briars and Laurelton Hall.  It was only natural, therefore, that one of the earliest leaded glass lamps created by Tiffany Studios was the Trumpet Creeper.  First made around 1903, the shape of the Trumpet Creeper shade mimics that of the Wisteria and Grape table lamps which were introduced about the same time.  All three models also have a top comprised of cast open bronzework.  Unlike the other two, however, the Trumpet Creeper features additional thick leading, replicating vines, that descends almost to the irregular lower border. The vine (Campsis radicans) is practically tropical in its lushness and, in the example offered here, Tiffany Studios portrayed the plant in all of its radiant grandeur.  In examining the shade, it is sometimes easy to overlook the superior aesthetics of the women responsible for selecting the actual glass.  The glasshouse produced flat glass in an almost infinite number of colors, color combinations and textures, a necessity for their leaded glass window business.  Each glass selector was required to have not only an instinctual grasp of advanced color theory, it was also essential that she had the patience to find the perfect sheet or section of glass that was stored among the hundreds of racks and bins located at the factory. Louis C. Tiffany, faced by a strike of his workmen in December 1892, gambled on his belief that women, after receiving the proper artistic training that only he could provide, possess a more refined appreciation of the subtle differences between tone and tone and at the same time greater taste in their combination. The shade presented here gloriously validates Tiffanys prescience.  The large open trumpet-shaped blossoms, in various stages of growth, are dominant and are depicted in rich shades of opalescent red, dark apricot and peach.  The buds and closed blossoms are of lighter matching tones as well as in orange and amber-streaked yellow.  Some of the glass comprising the flowers has a rippled texture that adds to the three-dimensionality of the buds and blossoms.  The verdant leafage, pendant from the descending vines, is almost as striking in its wondrous variety of white- and yellow-tinged greens.  All this on a truly magnificent background of opalescent and transparent glass that gradates from rich ultramarine and purple at the upper portion to violet and finally to amethyst-streaked clear glass near the lower border. This shade, from a technical standpoint, was probably easier to make than the Wisteria because of the larger pieces of glass employed.  The glass selection for this Trumpet Creeper, however, took considerably longer as perfectly coordinating the broader range of colors demanded a far greater effort.  The present example is magnificent in its superb painterly interpretation of one of Tiffanys favorite plants portrayed as dusk approaches.  It is undeniably the finest example of the model known to exist.  Most certainly designed and created by a senior member of the firm's Womens Glass Cutting Department, this Trumpet Creeper exemplifies the highest artistic achievements of Tiffany's lamp production. Paul Doros [ESSAY BETWEEN TRUMPET CREEPER + WISTERIA] The Fringe of Living Glory: Tiffany's Flowering Vines After creating the design for the Wisteria lamp (lot 326), Clara Driscoll went on to design related shades with other floral species but employing the same deep canopy shape as the Wisteria. These new designs included the Trumpet Creeper (lot 327) and Grape, both vines like the Wisteria, and Apple Blossom. It is revealing that on Tiffany Studios comprehensive 1906 Price List, the Trumpet Creeper, Grape, and Apple Blossom shades were listed with the notation Wistaria Block. In other words, they were formed on the same wooden forms that had been introduced for the Wisteria, thus reasserting the primacy of that model. Since the discovery of Driscolls correspondence with her family, it has become fashionable to credit her alone with many of the lamp designs from Tiffany Studios, not taking into account the contribution of Tiffany himself. It was, after all, his personal credo that decorative designs should be based on natural forms. As he matured he increasingly disdained the traditional Western emphasis on Greco-Roman art and instead turned to Nature. Nature is always right, he proclaimed, Nature is always beautiful. Thus when Driscoll had the idea of fashioning a lamp shade that mimicked the hanging panicles of wisteria, and a lamp base that echoed its gnarled vine, she did so within an environment that welcomed such tributes to nature. When Tiffany was describing his home and gardens at Laurelton Halls, he expressed his admiration for the vines that grew on the buildings: The creepers frame the openings, giving a charm and graceful unity to everything. They are great travellers, verilytramps. They go underground, across door-heads, over cornices, stopping up gutters, filling odd corners, doing no end of mischief What harmonizers! What decorative artists! Can architectural embellishment, pediment or cornice surpass the fringe of living glory presented by the creepers Always in style, always exempt from even the dictation of Dame Fashion! Always mellowing, softening, harmonizing whithersoever they go Although these words did not appear in print until 1906, Tiffanys admiration for vines and their ability to soften architectural forms was registered much earlier, as in the 1880s in a set of transom windows that adorned a bay window in his Manhattan mansion. These transoms, imitating flowering wisteria vines, were probably known to Clara Driscoll who on occasion visited his home. In fact, it could even be that she and her staff executed them. The more important point, however, is that such windows and lamp designs with their fringe of living glory represent an idea that was common to Tiffany and his staff. The Wisteria and Trumpet Creeper lamps presented here (lots 23 and 24) remind us that Tiffany was both an inspired artist and horticulturist, and that Clara Driscoll, his capable lieutenant, understood how to translate his vision into reality. Martin Eidelberg

  • USAUSA
  • 2018-12-12
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"Sauterelle" Bar

From an edition of two Impressed FRANCOIS-XAVIER/LALANNE/70 with artist's monogram Over the course of his multi-decade career, Francois-Xavier Lalanne inspired and delighted viewers with his sculptural interpretations of the natural world. In his extensive and diverse body of work, much of which he co-created with his wife, Claude, Lalanne experimented with imagery, aesthetics, material, and functionality to ignite curiosity and endear his whimsical sculptures. Flora and fauna become cleverly stylized. Animals cast in metal are depicted with soft, expressive features. The scale of his subjects is unexpectedly expanded or reduced. Unlikely plant, animal, and human forms coalesce into charming creatures drawn from fantasy. Never quite what they seem, Lalannes creations are brought to life through the artists incorporation of an imaginative element of surprise. In some of his most exciting work, Lalanne exercised his incredible technical ingenuity to surprise us with transformation and utility. Lalanne rejected that art and decoration are mutually exclusiveboth he and Claude preferred their works to be enjoyed in the intimacy of the home or to exist freely in a public garden, not beyond the viewers reach in a museum or gallery. Governed by this philosophy, the thoughtfully conceived functionality of Lalannes sculptures both bewilders and domesticates what might otherwise be a fantastic or supernatural form. With a simple movement, a bird spreads its wings and transforms into a table. A wooly sheep provides comfortable seating. A gorilla pulls open its chest to expose a safe.  Nature is transformed into sculpture and sculpture physically transforms into utility. The present lot, Lalannes exquisite Sauterelle, is at one moment a wild, oversized sculpture of a grasshopper, and the next instant its body opens to function as a bar. Executed in 1970, Sauterelle made its public debut in the same year at an exhibition dedicated to the work of Les Lalannes at Galerie Alexandre Iolas in Paris. It is one of only two examples made with luxurious Sèvres porcelain; the other was presented as a gift by President Georges Pompidou to Queen Elizabeth II and the Duke of Edinburgh in 1972, where it remains in their collection today. The bar furniture piece is one that Lalanne explored in multiple animal formshippopotamus, carp, a polymorphic cat. He created sculptures with similar mechanisms to transform into desks, wash basins, even a fireplace within the belly of a baboon. Though his work is wonderfully witty and original, it is not without the influence of history. It is apparent the ways in which Lalanne was inspired by the Surrealist movement and the innovation of convertible 18th century French furniture.  The often massive scale of his sculpture, including that of Sauterelle, references Lalannes personal experience working as a guard in the Egyptian and Assyrian galleries at the Louvre. There, alone in the galleries during closed hours, Lalanne had the ancient monumental stone sculptures to himself to revel in their quiet yet overwhelming power and dignity. With its hinged porcelain plates closed, the larger-than-life Sauterelle has striking sculptural presence. The sharp angles of its welded steel legs bring energy and dynamism to the work, almost making us believe it might suddenly spring into the air. When opened, the revelation of its utility tames the imposing yet charismatic beast by inviting viewers to approach and interact. Its wings rise up and outward to offer a surface to rest your drink. It is this clever synthesis of art and function, fantasy and familiarity, that makes Sauterelle a quintessential work within Lalannes oeuvre. It is exemplary of what art critic John Russell described as a complex art: one which mates Ancient Egypt with Alice in Wonderland, zoology with cabinet-making, metaphysics with personal adornment. It is also an art of psychic equilibrium. Its basic temper is inquisitive, undiscouraged, resourceful. It is there to work for us, yet it is not at all servile. It has its own life, and it leads it, and we are the richer for its being around.

  • USAUSA
  • 2018-05-24
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"Wisteria" Table Lamp

The “Wisteria” lamp model is one of the most iconic lamp designs produced by Tiffany Studios.  Its complex pattern is comprised of nearly 2,000 pieces of glass that had to be individually selected and cut.  Consequently, each "Wisteria" lamp possesses its own distinct color variations.  This particular example has an exquisite range of deep cobalt blue glass, and the lower panicles are selectively accented in rich jewel-toned aqua.  The overall effect achieved by the glass selection is lyrical and full of movement, capturing the lushness of the wisteria vine in bloom.  The shade and base are both impressed with the firm’s production number, 10116, reinforcing that both components originated together from the time of manufacture.  In 1906, the price for a "Wisteria" lamp was $400.00, making it one of the more expensive lamps in Tiffany’s line.  As revered as this luxury item was in the period, the "Wisteria" lamp is now widely recognized as an icon of American design and one of Tiffany Studios’ most accomplished masterworks in leaded glass.  The fully saturated and artistic glass selection of the present example distinguishes it as one of the finest examples ever to appear on the auction market. Shade with small early tag impressed TIFFANY STUDIOS/NEW YORKunderside of bronze armature on shade impressed 10116top of base standard impressed 10116base plate impressed TIFFANY STUDIOS/NEW YORK/10116outer perimeter edge of underbase impressed 10116 and 1   

  • USAUSA
  • 2013-12-18
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An Important "Snowball" Floor Lamp

With a "Scroll" Senior floor base and "Pig Tail" finial Shade inscribed twice with Walter P. Chrysler, Jr., accession number GAT 82.53base impressed Tiffany Studios/NEW YORK/375 Nature's unlimited palette presented Tiffany's glassmakers and glass selectors with an abundance of opportunities to experiment with color and the transmission of light through glass as they crafted each floral shade.  Springtime flowers, such as peonies, tulips, daffodils, and wisteria, each blooming in a riot of vibrant color, were Tiffany's preferred subject surely because they called for the most richly saturated glass selections.  However, Tiffany's depiction of the snowball viburnuma predominantly white flowerin the present example of the shade model is perhaps one of his most artistic and complex experiments in colored glass. Though the model is often referred to interchangeably as "Hydrangea" and "Snowball," Tiffany was clear in the identification of this shade as a Snowball, the popular name for viburnum, in both the Price List and a watercolor study for the shade in the collection of the Metropolitan Museum of Art (accession no. 67.654.468).  Compared to the hydrangea, which blooms in a variety of white, pink, purple, and blue tones, the viburnum's white flower might seem like a simpler subject.  However, even when depicting the color white, Tiffany demonstrates his mastery of color.  In this particular example, the snowballs are executed in shades of soft green, blue and periwinkle.  So many shades of white occurring in naturedappled by the sun, reflecting the sky and surrounding leaves and gardenare depicted in an impressionistic style recalling the effect of a painting done en plein air.  The vigorously mottled glass selected for the snowball blossoms even captures the texture of the clustered viburnum petals, which are offset against a background of cerulean blue and variegated green tones. The exquisite, carefully studied palette of the present shade distinguishes it as a masterwork by the firm, and the lamp is further enriched by its illustrious provenance coming from the collection of Walter P. Chrysler, Jr.  Chrysler was the heir to his family's automobile fortune and he devoted himself to the preservation and promotion of art.  His collection was vast and diversea lifelong endeavor to acquire pieces that were innovative, novel, and that spoke to the spirit of the age in which they were created.  Works by Tiffany Studios were among the countless treasures in Chrysler's collection, many of which reside today in the Chrysler Museum of Art in Norfolk, Virginia, constituting one of the premiere public assemblages of Tiffany Studios in the United States.

  • USAUSA
  • 2018-12-12
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An Important "Wisteria" Table Lamp

With a "Tree" base Shade with small early tag impressed TIFFANY STUDIOS/NEW YORKunderside of shade mounting post impressed 10116top of base column impressed 10116base plate impressed TIFFANY STUDIOS/NEW YORK/10116 and 1underside of perimeter base cushion impressed 10116 and 1 Designed in 1901 by Clara Driscoll, the Wisteria lamp quickly became one of the most successful models produced by Tiffany Studios.  Within five years of its introduction, the price for a Wisteria lamp was listed at $400.00, making it one of the most expensive lamps in Tiffanys line.  As revered as this luxury item was in the period, the Wisteria lamp is now widely recognized as an icon of American design and one of Tiffany Studios greatest accomplishments in leaded glass.  Its complex pattern is comprised of nearly 2,000 individually cut and selected glass tiles.  As a result, each Wisteria lamp possesses its own distinct character and color palette, despite being a standardized model.  This particular example presents an exquisite range of deep cobalt blue glass, and the lower panicles are selectively accented in rich jewel-toned aqua.  The overall effect achieved by the glass selection is lyrical and full of movement, capturing the lushness of the wisteria vine in bloom. Both the shade and base of the present example are impressed 10116, underscoring that these elements originated together from the time of their production at Tiffany Studios over 100 years ago.  The fully saturated and artistic glass selection of the present example distinguishes it as one of the finest examples ever to appear on the auction market.

  • USAUSA
  • 2018-12-12
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A Rare "Trumpet Creeper" Table Lamp

With a large "Tree" base Shade impressed TIFFANY STUDIOS/NEW YORK/346-1underside of bronze armature on shade impressed 7879 (partially effaced)base impressed TIFFANY STUDIOS/NEW YORK/348 Tiffany Studios paired the large "Tree" base with all of their irregular border shades, including the "Trumpet Creeper," "Wisteria," "Grape" and "Apple Blossom" models.  A late 1890s photograph from the study collection of Agnes Northrop depicting trees in Gibraltar with exposed root systems may point to the original source of inspiration for this base design. A Garden of Creepers Trumpet creeper, wisteria, grape, laburnum, clematis—Tiffany loved flowering vines both as a designer and as a gardener.  He admired them not only for the blossoms’ beautiful colors and interesting shapes but also for the way they freely grew across boundaries, “giving a charm and graceful unity to everything.”  Transom windows depicting wisteria enriched rooms in Tiffany’s Madison Avenue mansion and Laurelton Hall. Similar vines crawl across the tops of the many domestic windows that Tiffany Studios executed for clients’ homes across the country such as the magnificent window from the Beltzhoover mansion in Irving-on-the-Hudson where flowering wisteria and clematis vines frame the view (fig. 1). It was a natural progression for Clara Driscoll, the chief designer for his floral lamps, to adapt the idea of a leaded glass wisteria window into a lamp and represent sculpturally the sense of a twisted, creeping vine and pendant leaves and blossoms.  She did this around 1902, and then she went on to create similar lamps with trumpet creeper, grape, and other vines.  The essential form of the shade remained the same, as did the base with its twisted vine stems.  All that need to be adjusted was the pattern of leaves, flowers and branches. The small metal tag with a model number soldered onto the leading inside this shade indicates that this was probably one of the first examples of the Trumpet Creeper shade to be produced.  The tag has both the model number “346” and the suffix “—1.” These so-called “dash numbers” were introduced early on when the lamp business first began to flourish and were nothing more than an accounting system to regulate the stock.  Each pattern was assigned a model number, and then, as the shades were produced, each example was marked with a suffix in numerical sequence.  Thus this shade was the very first one made once the system was introduced.  (Ultimately, though, this system was abandoned and just the model number was attached.) But even without the dash number and without knowing that the lamp had been given as a wedding present in 1906, one might surmise that this was an early example because of the great care taken in the selection of the glass.  Although the flowers of the trumpet creeper are essentially uniform in color, here they are an extraordinarily rich mixture of yellows, oranges and reds, just as the leaves are not merely green but have flashes of yellow and orange.  As in an Impressionist painting, the effect is a rich orchestration of broken color.  Tiffany and his staff were inspired by Nature but ultimately improved and transcended it. -Martin Eidelberg, Co-Author of  The Lamps of Louis Comfort Tiffany, and Author of Tiffany Favrile Glass and the Quest of Beauty and Tiffany Favrile Pottery and the Quest of Beauty

  • USAUSA
  • 2012-12-15
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Invendu

A highly important german silver sabbath and festival hanging lamp (judenstern)

Of three tier tower form, partly pierced with scrolls and geometric motifs: the top tier with partly tiled windowed dome with openwork coronet pierced with strapwork and double-headed eagles displayed below trefoils, the dome surrounded by a gallery occupied by eight figures with emblems as follows: Rosh Hashana - shofar and book, Purim - scroll and rattle, Passover - matzah and matzah scorer, Hanukah - menorah and ewer, Yom Kippur - knife and slain chicken, Shavuot - Tablets of the Law, Sukkot - lulav and etrog, Sabbath - havdalah candleholder and spice box; applied below with windows screened by strapwork and mask panels alternating  with spiraled pilasters topped by deer alternating with stylized mermaids;  the middle tier applied with alternate round and square windows, the first with wheel-like screens, the second with grids, spaced by spiraled  pilasters  matching those in the top section, all below a cast openwork rim of  fleurs-de-lys and scrolls; the lower tier applied with lion masks alternating with cannon-form fountain heads, spaced by mermaid-headed pilasters, all framed by two horizontal openwork borders of fleurs-de-lys and scrolls; the tower mounted by central rod and three slip-locks on an oil reservoir with star-shaped  projection of ten paneled spouts, each engraved underneath with two bands of diminishing scrolling foliage; the center of the base with large lion mask, from which is suspended the half-baluster drip-bowl chased with three hounds pursuing a stag, doe and rabbit within ragged foliage on matted ground, melon-form terminal; the tower with five detachable candle branches formed of cast openwork scrollwork fronted by a grotesque head, each suspending a bell and supporting a plain drip-pan and sconce, marked on all sections and four-drip-pans with maker’s mark of Johann Adam Boller and Frankfurt city mark, circa 1710; the lamp suspended from a silver two-piece saw-edged ratchet with four cast eagle-head terminals, the top applied with two cast double headed eagles displayed, marked on each piece with maker’s mark of Jacob Loschhorn and city mark of Frankfurt, circa 1770. Together with ten silver drip-channels, chased except for one with flames, nine with maker’s mark I L F in trefoil, also stamped 12, East German or Polish, late 18th century. This lamp is one of the most complete of a small group of highly-decorated silver “Judenstern” Sabbath lamps.  Probably the richest productions of the golden age of Frankfurt Jewry, they speak to the wealth and sophistication of that community in the early 18th century. the frankfurt ghetto While other southern German cities were expelling their Jewish populations in the late 16th century, Frankfurt allowed its ghetto to remain; it soon became the largest Jewish community in Germany.  Despite the Fettmilch riots in the early 17th century, the community prospered.  Laws governing the Frankfurt ghetto were supposed to restrict its population to 500 families, with a maximum of 12 marriages per year.  However, the reality of the extensive Jewish population made the ghetto one of the most densely populated places in Europe.  Families of Court Jews and recent immigrants from farm communities were all crowded together into the short stretch of the Judengasse.  From 1718, the Holy Roman Emperor in Vienna granted official recognition to representatives of the ghetto, although restrictive laws remained in place through the end of the 18th century. Sumptuary laws give another insight into the richness of the Frankfurt community, and the role of a family’s silver pieces.  In 1715 – after the terrible 1711 fire which almost totally destroyed the ghetto – the Jewish Council restricted what silver objects could be displayed at the Spinholtz, the reception held at the bride’s house on Friday afternoon before the Saturday evening ceremony.  The three permitted forms were a leuchter, a lamp, and a becher, presumably the Sabbath light, the Hanukah lamp, and the Kiddush beaker (Weber, op. cit., p. 174).  Thus, these forms were not just for private devotion, but had a public display role, proclaiming the wealth and magnificence of the families involved. the tower-form “judenstern” sabbath lamps Guido Schoenberger finds the origin of these lamps in Roman hanging lamps with central reservoir and a rosette shape for the wicks to protrude. The Jewish form develops through the Middle Ages into a star form of Messianic significance.  He notes that silver versions were already being made in Frankfurt in the 16th century, entered into the Hallmarking Books of the Frankfurt Goldsmiths’ Guild in 1540 and 1557, under the name of “ein silberner Judenstern” (op.cit., p.196-197). He relates the cannon-form fountain spouts to the fountains found in the centers of European cities such as the “Schone Brunnen” of Nuremberg, a silversmithing center with wide influence. Schoenberger ties the idea of a fountain to Psalm 36:10: “For with Thee is the fountain of life, in Thy light do we see light.” The Sabbath is greeted as a “fountain of blessing” in “Lekha dodi”, a hymn of welcome that was incorporated into synagogue services in Frankfurt in the late 17th century. However the idea of a fortified tower with figures is an appropriate image for the strength of the Jewish Faith.  Spice boxes were usually modeled in tower form, based on town hall, church or castle towers which would have landmark status at the time and thus be an image coming readily to mind.  However, the degree of elaboration seen on the Steinhardt lamp is greater than examples known to survive in actual masonry.  This suggests that these tower-form lamps are a conceit made partly from real examples and partly probably from temporary architecture such as used for processions or masques.  Fantastic towers also appeared in table decorations, both edible in stuffs such as marzipan, or worked in silver and gilt metal.  Especially popular in Germany  in the 16th and  17th century, nefs or ships - sometimes with projecting cannon - could be manned with numerous small figures of sailors and soldiers (see John Hayward, Virtuoso Goldsmiths, 1540-1620, 1976, item 548, p.391, for a Strasbourg example).  The fantastic architecture used on the sterns of real galleons may have been another inspiration, with their superimposed bands of windows framed in fantastic carving, topped by a balustrade, and the sides bristling with cannon. surviving lamps Seven lamps are known from late 17th and early 18th century Frankfurt; the style had a coda in Nuremberg in the later 18th century.  All of the Frankfurt examples are the products of a close group of associated goldsmiths. Three of the lamps have a partly-open body populated with figures, giving more of the feeling of a gazebo or pavilion than a fortified tower; these are particularly close to fantastic stage or festival architecture of the baroque.  Traditionally, these have been dated earlier than the closed tower examples: j.v. schüller, frankfurt, “the rothschild lamp," jewish museum, new york, jm 37-52[i] This lamp has just one row of lion masks and cannon, separated by fantastic masks, below a bell-hung pavilion of slender columns with emblematic figures standing between.  The truncated column top is pierced with crescents and rosettes. j.v. schüller, frankfurt. jewish museum, new york, f2707[ii] A partially reconstructed lamp, the central stem has a band of alternating lion masks and cannon, topped by one of protruding rosettes in two patterns, than a third tier of alternating square and circular grilled windows below the openwork pavilion.  Here, the figures front the columns supporting a crown-form openwork dome. j.a. boller, frankfurt, “the lehman lamp,” temple emanu-el, new york[iii] By the same maker as the Steinhardt lamp, this lamp has an upper tier of candle arms as well as the star of oil lamps.  The chasing on these radiating lights, centered by a lion mask, matches the offered piece, and Salomonic columns on the balustrades and inverted tulip dome recall the Steinhardt lamp, but the body is composed of pierced foliage, without any of the cannon, grilled windows, or lion masks of other lamps in the group. The second group of lamps derives from the first, but with a more architectural “turret” top and without the openwork pavilion. j.v. schüller, frankfurt, skirball museum, los angeles.[iv] This lamp has three tiers, tripped with the fleur-de-lys border, but without emblematic figures of candle arms.  The lowest tier of lion heads is spaced with roundels which were probably originally cannon ends; the second tier is circular and square grilled windows, while the third tier now has plain roundels. j.a. boller, frankfurt, “the steinhardt lamp,” the offered lot j.a. boller, frankfurt. jewish museum, new york, f4400.[v] A little-published lamp also in the Jewish Museum, this piece is probably closest to the Steinhardt lamp, with similar star, drip pan, three tiers, and candle arms.  The figures are mounted, not at the top of the three architectural tiers, but on an additional gallery mounted partway up the tall spire. george wilhelm schedel, frankfurt, dated 1738/39, consistoire, paris, on loan to the israel museum (l-b86.0017;117/220.)[vi] A three-tiered lamp with a drip pan by J.C. Scüller, this piece is so close to the previous two Boller lamps as to suggest it was either made under Boller’s supervision or closely following his design and using his molds.  The balcony does not have a full complement of emblematic figures. It is worth mentioning another group of lamps, as they seem to be the following generation of the Frankfurt model.  The silhouette, with its little turrets, is much more architectural, and very close to surviving structures in Germany. Johann Jacob Runecke, Fürth (outside Nuremberg), circa 1780, “The Sassoon Lamp,” New York Private Collection.[vii] Martin Carl Haniagen. Dublon, Nuremberg. Historische Museum, Hannover.[viii] Maker unknown, probably Nuremberg. formerly Paris, Coll. A Fischel [i] Vivian B. Mann and Richard I Cohen, eds. From Court Jews to the Rothschilds: Art, Patronage and Power, 1600-1800, Munich: Prestel, 1996, no. 127, p. 184 [ii] Purchased from Parke-Bernet Galleries, New York, January 4, 1951, Gothic Renaissance Art: Furniture, Sculpture, Bronzes [iii] Cissy Grossman, A Temple Treasury: The Judaica Collection of Congregation Emanu-El of the City of New York, New York, 1989, no 87, pp.104-106 [iv] New Beginnings, The Skirball Museum Collections and Inaugural Exhibition, pl. 15, p. 36 [v] Formerly private collection Frankfurt, reproduced Guido Schoenberger, “A Silver Sabbath Lamp from Frankfort-on-the-Main” in Essays in Honor of Georg Swarzenski, 1951, p.197, illus. fig.3, p.195 [vi] With an earlier drip bowl by J. V. Schüler. Illustrated Victor A. Klagsbald, Jewish Treasures from Paris, from the Collections of the Cluny Museum and the Consistoire. Jerusalem: The Israel Museum, 1982, no. 67 [vii] Sold Sotheby’s Tel Aviv, April 24, lot 19 [viii]  Nurnberger Goldschmiedekunst, 1541-1868, no 97, illus. p. 734 the boller-schüller circle The lamps come from a Frankfurt workshop started by Johann Valentin Schüller (master 1680), and continued by his brother Johann Michael Schüller (master 1684), and the latter’s brother-in-law Johann Adam Boller (master 1706).  The first two were the children of Michael Schüller, also a silversmith in Aschaffenburg. Johann Valentin Schüller was born in 1650 in Aschaffenburg, and became apprentice to Jacob Rap in 1666, master in 1680, married in 1680, Anna Margaretha  Guldemundt, daughter of a shoemaker. He died in 1726.  His younger brother, Johann Michael Schüller, was born in 1658, became master in 1684 and in the same year married Anna Catharina, daughter of the musician Johann Adolff Boller.  He married secondly in 1706 Anna Gertraud Gras and died in 1718. Johann Adam Boller, son of the musician Johann Adolff, became master in 1706 and married in 1707 Catharina Hardt, daughter of Johann Jacob Hardt. He died in 1732 Georg  Wilhelm Schedel, baptized  in 1698 son of Johann Schedel zu Oberkotzau im  Voigtland, became master in 1722 and married in the same year  Anna Catharina Reutlinger, daughter of silversmith Elias Reutlinger.  On her death in 1726 he married Helena Steffan, daughter of the chapel musician Henrich Moritz Steffan, and died in 1762. Rötger (Rudiger) Herfurth was born in 1722 son of Johann Joachim Herfurth, silver dealer and  his first  wife Anna Margaretha  Bein, became master in 1748 and married first in 1749 Maria  Elisabeth Hoffmann and secondly in 1761 Rebecca Jenichen  and died in 1776. Johann Jacob Löschhorn (Leschhorn) was baptised in 1740 son of silversmith Jacob; master in 1769 and died in 1787. Biographical information taken from Wolfgang Scheffler, Goldschmiede Hessens, 1976. In Crowning Glory, Silver Torah Ornaments of the Jewish Museum, New York, p. 83 Rafi Grafman examines the relationship between these makers and indicates that the Schüllers, Boller and Schedel ran the same workshop from about 1680 till the middle of the 18th century. The branches which support the sconces on the present lamp are cast from the same molds as the Torah Shield by Schüller, lot 94 in this sale.  The same castings may be seen in the Shield formerly in the Furman Collection, by Johann Valentin Schüller, (Bezalel Narkiss, Treasures of Jewish Art from the Jacabo and Asea Furman Collection of Judaica, pp. 56-57).

  • USAUSA
  • 2013-04-29
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Tiffany Studios Zinnia Table Lamp

Tiffany Studios Zinnia Table Lamp. "The lamp's history is well-documented, indicating that it is a unique work which was neither sold nor duplicated. It remained in the Studio's inventory when the firm closed following Tiffany's death in 1933. At that time it was sold by the appointed public receiver, Herman Cohen, to Mrs. Charles Burton, of Baltimore, who bequeathed it on her death in 1975 to her brother, Wallace Groves, of Floroves, Florida. Another acquisition at the time by a member of Mrs. Burton's family was the Mosaic fountain now installed in the Charles Engelhard Court in the American wing at The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York. No records have survived to identify with certainty the lamp's correct name. The shade's floral pattern provides the only clue- that of flowering zinnias." Shade: unsigned. Base: Mosaic tiles in bronze, impressed TIFFANY STUDIOS NEW YORK. Height 28 1/2 inches (72.5 cm.). Diameter of shade 24 inches (61 cm.). This lamp is pictured on pg. 303 of "Louis C. Tiffany, The Garden Museum Collection"; pg. 20 of "Tiffany Lamps and Metalwork", by Alastair Duncan; and is pictured on pg. 13, as well as the cover photograph, of "The Art of Louis Comfort Tiffany", by Vivienne Couldrey.Provenance: Tiffany Studios bankruptcy sale, Washington D.C., March 14-19, 1938; Mrs. Charles Burton, Baltimore, Maryland; Lillian Nassau, Ltd., New York; Burt Sugarman; Christies, New York, March 30, 1985, lot 21; Tiff.look collection, Osaka, Japan; Sothebys, New York, June 11, 1992, lot 287; The Garden Museum Collection, Matsue, Japan.

  • USAUSA
  • 2012-11-17
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A Rare "Poinsettia" Floor Lamp

With a "Scroll" Senior floor base and "Pig Tail" finial Shade impressed TIFFANY STUDIOS NEW YORKbase impressed TIFFANY STUDIOS/NEW YORK/28623 Poinsettias, a plant native to Mexico, were introduced to the United States in 1828 by Joel R. Poinsett (1779-1851), an amateur botanist who was Americas first Minister to Mexico and later became Secretary of War under Martin van Buren.  Because of their late blooming season, generally between October and January, and with their brilliant red bracts against vivid green leafage, the plant soon became associated with Christmas and became exceptionally popular in the United States. Tiffany, an expert botanist and brilliant marketer, took advantage of the Poinsettias appeal by using it for several models of lamp shades.  Surprisingly, examples of the design did not appear until around December 1908, when Tiffany Studios introduced the version as a large chandelier in a New York Times advertisement.  Not surprising is that the holiday connection was prominently promoted: The Poinsettia, executed like all the Tiffany Studios shades under the personal direction of Mr. Louis C. Tiffany, possesses a distinctive Christmas atmosphere.  Gives the rich reds and greens of the Poinsettia with remarkable fidelity. Three years later, the company advertised the table lamp version as a practical Christmas gift of permanent value and most acceptable as remembrances. The company made the shade in six different sizes, with diameters ranging from 14 to 26 inches.  The largest example with flowers covering its entirety, is supremely artistic as the example offered here clearly demonstrates.  The bracts of the poinsettias, depicted in various stages of growth, are in opalescent shades of ruby, crimson, scarlet and purple-streaked carmine.  The foliage, with finely leaded veining, is in various shades of green marbled with yellow and amber. Of particular note are the small central cyathias of the poinsettias, which are the actual flowering part of the plant.  Usually a plain yellow in nature, in this shade they are interpreted very differently, through the employment of sapphire-colored glass together with the highly unusual application of iridescent Favrile Cypriote glass.  The background is also exceptional, with its combination of opalescent, translucent and transparent yellow glass, much of it of the foliage, or confetti, variety with thin fractured shards of red, amber, green and white glass embedded on the interior surface.  The overall effect achieved by this rich and diverse glass selection transcends the model, imparting the shade with tremendous visual depth, tactility and movement.  All things considered, this stunning lamp is perhaps the finest example of the model to come onto the market in recent history. Paul Doros

  • USAUSA
  • 2018-12-12
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An Important "Peony" Table Lamp

With a rare "Mosaic and Turtle-Back" tile base Shade impressed TIFFANY STUDIOS NEW YORK 1505-37underside of removable socket cluster unit impressed 2 twicetop interior rim of base impressed 2base plate impressed TIFFANY STUDIOS/NEW YORK/2674 The present “Peony” shade was purchased from Sotheby’s New York in 2005 paired with an exceptional “Jeweled” base, now being offered by itself in lot 229.  One auction season earlier, the Geyer Family had purchased at Christie’s New York one of Tiffany’s most iconic and spectacular bases, the “Mosaic and Turtle-Back" tile model, which originated at the Tavern Club, a private gentleman’s club in Cleveland, Ohio, where it was paired with a “Geometric” shade and displayed on the library table of the main lounge.  The lamp was given to the club by a member in lieu of payment of dues in 1905, and remained the property of the club until its sale in 2004.  However, not only was the shade battered from years of lighthearted abuse by the members, but the lamp’s presentation was a radical juxtaposition of price and quality.  The base model, recorded in the 1906 Price List as model number 355 and priced at $300, was considerably more expensive than the majority of available shades.  Ordinarily paired with the firm's most premium large-scaled lamp shades, such as the “Hanging Head Dragonfly” (such a lamp is in the collection of The Art Institute of Chicago), or the extremely rare “Landscape” (a famous example was sold at Sotheby’s New York, The Mecom Collection, April 22, 1995, lot 66), the Geyer Family set out to create the quintessential unit and united this sumptuous "Peony" shade with the Tavern Club base. Peony--the Flower of Prosperity, Honor and Romance This magnificent Peony shade must have been executed in the Women’s Glass Cutting Division headed by Clara Driscoll, since she and her “Tiffany Girls” had the prerogative to make all leaded glass shades with floral subjects.  In all probability Driscoll herself designed it, since that was her responsibility and privilege.  Although she did not refer to this model in her many years of correspondence with her family, she designed it before October 1906 since the model (number 1505) is cited in Tiffany Studios’ 1906 Price List. With its lush, overblown blossoms, the Peony shade is one of the firm’s largest and richest designs, offering a wonderful opportunity for the selector to enrich the composition with a wide range of red glass ranging here from pink to red to deep crimson and purple.  This example is particularly rich, not only in color but also in its varied types of mottled and rippled glass, and this may well be due to the fact that it was made early on in production, when greater care was given to each object.  The so-called dash-number tag inside the shade suggests that it was the thirty-seventh example of this design, a measure of its great popularity.  Its popularity was due not only to its colorful floral beauty but also to certain practical concerns:  its generously sized dome, almost two feet wide, allowed great quantities of light to radiate out.  Unlike many of the Tiffany Studios lamps that were more decorative than functional, this model provides ample light for reading.  It is not surprising, then, that in 1910, when there was a general retrenchment in Tiffany Studios’ operations and many designs were discontinued, the Peony shade stayed in production and continued to be offered into the 1920s. Originally, this lamp base supported a Tiffany Studios Geometric shade.  The present arrangement, devised by the Geyers, is a splendid and appropriate use of the base.  The base is large and assertive, and requires a wide, strongly colored shade.  Like a rainbow, the base’s mosaic changes from a deep green at the bottom to deep blue, and the turtleback tiles at the top shift in tone from green to violet, an arrangement that accords with the palette of the Peony shade.  Indeed, this lamp base was designed with the idea that it should harmonize with different models of shades; it was not designed for just one.  Harmony of colors and materials was a key concern for Tiffany in all the works that bore his name, and this lamp evidences that practicality.  Art and commerce could be successfully joined. -Martin Eidelberg, Co-Author of The Lamps of Louis Comfort Tiffany, and Author of Tiffany Favrile Glass and the Quest of Beauty and Tiffany Favrile Pottery and the Quest of Beauty

  • USAUSA
  • 2012-12-15
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An Important "Elaborate Peony" Table Lamp

With a "Roman" base Shade impressed TIFFANY STUDIOS NEW YORK 1903base impressed TIFFANY STUDIOS/NEW YORK/529 This Elaborate Peony Table Lamp hails from a distinguished Brazilian family whose heritage lies in preserving a legacy of taste and refinement. A sage saying has been passed down through the generations: After a great defeat, always be able to play a piano; after all, you will never know when it will be necessary to rebuild your life. Indeed, every member of the family was required to learn the piano at a renowned conservatory, thereby learning the grace and sophistication of their forebearers and inheriting an asset that would stay with them irrespective of their material possessions. At the beginning of the 20th century, the patriarch of the family extended this tradition to the tangible, bequeathing upon his four children the essential heirlooms of a family. Each child thereby received a piano from Steinway & Sons, a painting by Pablo Picasso, and a lamp from Tiffany Studios. With the exception of the pianos, the whereabouts of these gifts was thought to have been lost to time. The present sale, however, sees the reemergence of one of these childrens Tiffany lamps, enabling the realization of the next chapter of this familys lore through a new lens. The peony blossom, with its extraordinary lushness and variation in color palette, was the ideal subject for Tiffanys leaded glass shades. The firm produced several variations of the floral motif, highlighting Tiffanys admiration for this springtime flower. The many delicate layers of petals depicted in the Elaborate Peonythe most complex and naturalistic of the firms peony shade variantsfeatures both full, mature blossoms and young, not-yet-bloomed buds, which punctuate the overall composition. Depicting both the fully-bloomed and yet-to-bloom flower imbues the composition with a wonderful Impressionistic quality, as if to capture a single, fleeting moment in nature. The present Elaborate Peony example is a tour de force, exemplifying Tiffanys unparalleled ability as a colorist. Tiffanys craftsmen often surpassed the colors found in nature when executing peony shades, using a range of predominantly pink glass, but the present shade stands apart. Here, luscious hues of magenta, fuschia, deep red, and soft pink combine with lavender, indigo, and violet to bring the peony blossoms to life. They are set against a background of cobalt and azure blue, creating an exceptionally rich display of favrile glass.

  • USAUSA
  • 2018-05-24
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An Important “Dragonfly” Floor Lamp

With a rare "Ball" base and finial Shade impressed TIFFANY STUDIOS NEW YORK 1507-7base impressed TIFFANY STUDIOS/NEW YORK Dragonflies proved to be one of the most popular subjects for Tiffany Studios lamp shades. Clara Driscoll created the first example in 1899a model that depicted the insects flying against a complex background with marsh plants and red flowers. Soon thereafter the design was radically altered: the floral background was eliminated and the insects were presented in a repetitive, conventionalized design, one that is markedly simpler. This became the basis for all the dragonfly shades that followed. Other elements, especially small and large cabochon jewels, were introduced. Adding to this rich repertoire, on some models the dragonfly heads were extended below the shades border and the wings established an undulant lower edge. All of these changes were carried over from table lamps to large floor lamps, and there were many color arrangements as well. These many variants existed side-by-side, offering a wide variety of possibilities. This wealth of models suggests the economic well-being of the company, its ability to satisfy a large, varied public, and the commercial popularity of the dragonfly motif in the period. A striking feature of this particular floor lamp is the opalescent glass balls that encircle the base and embellish the upper finial. The idea of producing such iridescent spheres must have occurred after 1900, but once invented, they were employed in myriad ways: on the bases of candlesticks, jardinières, and mirror frames, set on plain leaded shades, encircling lamp bases as seen here, or set under lamps with Root bases (lot 9). In the companys official Price List, these spheres are noted by the abbreviation G.B., indicating glass balls. Yet despite this prosaic description, they are more like ropes of precious pearls, enhancing the objects with light and luster. The overall effect of this bold and colorful lamp transcends the history of its individual parts. Because there was a shared aesthetic throughout the firms many divisions, an aesthetic governed by Tiffanys personal vision, there is a wonderful harmony between all the elements. It is as though they were planned to be together from the start. The red and orange cabochon jewels in the shade, the red hemispheres of the dragonflies eyes, the lustrous glass balls distributed evenly around the base and the jeweled finialtogether they are like gemstones adorning a precious object. They glow with gentle incandescence when the lamp is not lit and they are charged with a brilliant, fiery light when the lamp is illuminated. Martin Eidelberg

  • USAUSA
  • 2018-12-11
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* Veuillez noter que le prix ne correspond pas à la valeur d'aujourd'hui, mais uniquement à la devise au moment de l'achat.

Lustrerie

Dans cette catégorie vous trouverez des candélabres, lampes, chandeliers et des lanternes. Les chandeliers classique, la lustrerie design et les lampes du milieu du 20e siècle suscite beaucoup d’intérêts dans les ventes aux enchères.